Podcast: Gartner attendees contemplate outsourcing, desktop Linux, Web apps and more

Podcast: Gartner attendees contemplate outsourcing, desktop Linux, Web apps and more

Summary: Ever since I started covering Gartner Symposium/ITxpo (years back), I've been going to the keynotes and the sessions, returning to the press room, and hammering out write-ups of what I heard. No doubt, I'll be doing that today if Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer drops any bombshells during his keynote "Mastermind" session.

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TOPICS: CXO
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Ever since I started covering Gartner Symposium/ITxpo (years back), I've been going to the keynotes and the sessions, returning to the press room, and hammering out write-ups of what I heard. No doubt, I'll be doing that today if Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer drops any bombshells during his keynote "Mastermind" session. But this year, I've been changing my approach, siezing the opportunity to speak with attendees to hear about what's on their minds and checking in on attitudes regarding popular trends in information technology. In this five minute podast with five separate Gartner attendees (probably my most complicated audio editing job to date), I asked each the same seven questions:

  • Budget: Up or down?
  • Outsourcing: More or less?
  • Scale up or scale out?
  • Vista: Ho-hum or can't wait?
  • Desktop Linux: Non-starter or contender?
  • Web-based productivity (eg: Word processing, spreadsheets): Fiction or reality?
  • What do you hope to accomplish while at the conference?

Of the first five questions, only one received the same answer from everybody. Can you guess which one? In fact, before listening to the podcast, see if you can guess what the split was for each question. It's only 5 minutes long so it goes very quickly.  

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Topic: CXO

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5 comments
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  • Pity

    I suspect that the transcript would have been interesting.

    Not all of us are surgically attached to entertainment media.
    Yagotta B. Kidding
    • Transcript?

      Not sure what you're referring to.

      db
      dberlind
      • Transcript, n.

        Transcript \Tran"script\ (tr[a^]n"skr[i^]pt), n. [L.
        transcriptum, neut. of transcriptus, p. p. of transcribere. See Transcribe.]
        1. That which has been transcribed; a writing or composition consisting of the same words as the original; a written copy.

        ------------

        Usually a readable copy of speech.
        Yagotta B. Kidding
  • Very basic interviews

    Basic Transcript, not verbatim, but not much missing either. ?Interviewed? five folks and recorded the one phrase answer.
    [i]Budget: Up or down? Down, up, up, up, up
    Outsourcing: More or less? More, more, more, more
    Scale up or scale out? Huh?Hopefully up, out, out, out, out
    Vista: Ho-hum or can't wait? For me ho-hum, Can?t wait, ho-hum, can?t wait, can?t wait
    Desktop Linux: Non-starter or contender? Small contender but not for me, non-starter, non-starter, non-starter, non-starter.
    Web-based productivity (eg: Word processing, spreadsheets): Fiction or reality? For the future it?s a reality, reality, reality, fiction, reality.
    What do you hope to accomplish while at the conference? New Stuff, ditto, etc.[/i]
    Needless to say, I was expecting much more.
    30otsix
  • Save money with outsourcing?

    I find it interesting that all say that they will outsource more, yet I have never heard of a case that really saved money. When you add a middleman who wants to make a profit, someone loses. Also, the outsource company is interested in saving money, not providing service (find a way to stop the clock to prevent service time issues). The company wants more service at less cost. In the end, the outsource employee ends up stuck between a rock and a hard place, having to document what they are doing and other things.

    With respect to Linux, part of the problem is that many managers are not technical and just go with the flow: if it is Blue, it has to be good (with respect to IBM). Also, they don't pay the cost out of their own pocket. If you looked at the cost of M$ products, services and support issues, I think that things would change. Perhaps a study on that would be good. Many issues with a Linux desktop can be fixed remotely, whereas is it much harder with Windoze.
    MistDaemon