Post-October Windows PC purchases likely to include coupon for Vista

Post-October Windows PC purchases likely to include coupon for Vista

Summary: Given the delays to the release of Windows Vista and the grief that's causing to system resellers, it looks like some sort of upgrade coupon is in the works. This follows news that Microsoft will be going to additional lengths to assuage customers that are signed up for the company's Software Assurance plan.

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TOPICS: Windows
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Given the delays to the release of Windows Vista and the grief that's causing to system resellers, it looks like some sort of upgrade coupon is in the works. This follows news that Microsoft will be going to additional lengths to assuage customers that are signed up for the company's Software Assurance plan.  Whereas the first Vista-enabled PCs are now expected in January 2007, the coupon program is apparently designed to encourage buyers to purchase Vista-capable PCs in Q4 (for example, for the holidays) knowing they can freely upgrade to Vista (with the coupon) once Vista hits.  According to Mary Jo Foley:

Microsoft and its PC partners have made no bones about the fact that some kind of Vista "tech guarantee" is in the works. According to DigiTimes, the Vista coupons will hit in October.

Even though Microsoft still appears to be committed to the January 2007 date for the consumer release of Vista (the business release is scheduled for November 2006), having a coupon program in place could do much more than just stimulate Q4-sales of Vista-capable PCs (including the new crop of Intel Core Duo-based systems).  It also covers Microsoft and system buyers in the event that Vista's shipping date slips again. Earlier this week, Gartner predicted that Vista wouldn't be generally available until Q2 2007.

Topic: Windows

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  • 6 Years Ago

    6 years ago, Apple shipped a OS with protected memory and the
    stability that comes with it, restricted administrative access and
    the security that comes with it, and a vector imaging engine that
    leveraged the GPU, with it came an advanced UI. The system
    requirements then were 128 Megs of RAM (old RAM), a G3
    running at about 300 MHz, and the older slower hard drives
    germaine to the period.

    Vista's system requirements are twice Apple's current
    requirements for Tiger, and many times more onerous than
    OSX's original requirements. It is not yet commercially available.
    While Microsoft once again endorses Apple's technologies with
    mimickry, the endorsement brings into focus a exponentially
    larger investment of time and money gone into producing
    something that finally presumes to compete. With WGA, UAC, a
    new untried network stack, the jury is far from coming in. It will
    likely take many years to effectively guage Vista's worth. If the
    verdict is not good, it may have taken 10 years to find out that
    the wrong choice had been made. 10 years of compromised
    productivity. How is it that a once shrewd business sector has
    turned into such pliant Mao'ists.

    So what does Microsoft offer today? What will compensate for a
    6 year delay and broken promises. What you get is a slip of
    paper with a new promise. An IOU based on a previous
    commitment to push something decent out the door.

    You're happy to get it.

    Do you folks ever have a nagging feeling that something may be
    wrong.
    Harry Bardal
    • Also known as FreeBSD, but with some GUI modifications.

      No need to praise Apple. Praise the volunteers who made FreeBSD what it was when Apple started to drool and froth for it...

      (Now I do like their new MacBooks - shh, don't tell anybody - but they are moochers too. Just as Xerox...)
      HypnoToad
    • And your point is??

      [b]Vista's system requirements are twice Apple's current requirements for Tiger, and many times more onerous than OSX's original requirements. [/b]

      So? You're comparing a 6 yr old OS with one that hasn't even been released yet. And for what it's worth, hardware hasn't exactly been sitting still in the past 6 years either. CPUs are on an entirely new level of performance than the G3's and P3/P4s of 6 years ago.

      And by the way - in case you haven't checked - HARDWARE'S CHEAP! I built a fully Vista ready computer earlier this year for under $450. That's including a nice set of high end speakers.

      [b]So what does Microsoft offer today? What will compensate for a 6 year delay and broken promises. What you get is a slip of paper with a new promise. An IOU based on a previous commitment to push something decent out the door. [/b]

      WHAT 6 year delay? XP was released in October of 2001. This is August of 2006 - that's NOT even 5 years. As for "broken promises" - I think we can both agree that it would be BEST to release a fully functioning product that doesn't need 1800 patches in the first week to make it work [b]properly[/b].

      So yes, they'll give you a coupon so you can get yourself a copy of Vista when it's ready to go. Seems a reasonable means to stimulate sales during the holiday season...

      For what it's worth - the only "problem" is there are only 24 hours in a day, only 7 days to the week and programmers need some downtime - sleep, eat, shower, etc..., maybe catch some TV, get some sunshine before they all completely burn out on programming and become something like Morlocks*...

      Geeze.. Make up your mind! On one hand, you MS critics want Vista out YESTERDAY but on the other hand, you seem to be worried about all those potential bugs and exploits.

      Of course, I'm sure some out there would prefer it if MS released something that wasn't ready for prime time... Just so you could have something to rag about. But it's not gonna happen. It'll be released when it's ready to go.

      * from HG Wells' classic novel "The Time Machine"
      Wolfie2K3
  • Its worse than that!

    Software Assurance is a marketing scheme that promises one thing and delivers less than that. Its a new version of "Bait and Switch". One division of the company talks about all the new features of an upcoming operating system or software package while another division makes nebulous promises about a future software upgrade plan. Then neither divsion delivers what the other has promised or implied is coming. I think the name Vista is especially appropriate. You see for miles that there's nothing there, there's a lot of room for you to fantasize what you think you'll be getting with this new operating system. The relities are different though. For the moneymen at Microsoft, its a wideopen field of profit opprotunities. For the rest of us its a bucket of sand in a Saharan mirage.
    Xwindowsjunkie
    • Agreed - also, what new products came out under SA since its inception?

      That's right: None.

      ZILCH between 2002 and now.

      Probably because Microsoft said that SA would allow them an automatic upgrade to the new version at no extra charge.

      Who are the pirates, again?
      HypnoToad
  • Given the cost of Vista, that coupon had better be big.

    And Linux can do everything Vista does. Right now. And by and large better too. (The Vista beta was atrocious... and for all the purported fixes since then, I doubt the ones I found will have been given any concern.)

    It's all eyecandy; I recall all the articles over the last 4 years about all of Longhorn (now Vista)'s new features... then how many of them started to be dropped just to meet that deadline, which is STILL to be in 2007.

    Yet people still think Microsoft is a top notch company.

    Let them pay for what they want. Flushing it down the toilet would given them a more interesting experience; expecially if the toilets have those little blue discs in them...

    Or give it to me. I'll be happy to set up Linux on peoples' PCs. :)
    HypnoToad
    • Maybe HypnoToad, but...

      [i]"Or give it to me. I'll be happy to set up Linux on peoples' PCs."[/i]

      but will they be as happy when none of their software runs anymore, or their sound is messed up, or their winmodem doesn't work, or their wireless networking doesn't work with WPA/WPA2, or (the list of Linux shortfalls just keeps on going).

      Linux is what it is, nothing wrong with that, but it isn't the magic pill to cure all that is wrong within the computer industry.

      I'd gladly take a computer with XP SP2 now, and a coupon for a Vista free upgrade (in fact I did that with a PC I bought in 1998 - installed with Win95 with an upgrade coupon for Win98).
      Scrat
    • Vista costs exactly the same as XP

      unless you want the value-added software.
      Michael Kelly