Scoble's 12 reasons for MS avoidance

Scoble's 12 reasons for MS avoidance

Summary: Responding to Ross Mayfield's post on Microsoft's challenges in pivoting into services world inhabited by Google and others (Microsoft's announcements on the subject coming later this morning), Microsoft alpha blogger Robert Scoble offers 12 reasons--such as start up costs, performance per dollar, no lock in, more scalable, more security, easier to customize--why Web 2.0 entrepreneurs say that they don't want to work with Microsoft software.

SHARE:
TOPICS: Microsoft
4

Responding to Ross Mayfield's post on Microsoft's challenges in pivoting into services world inhabited by Google and others (Microsoft's announcements on the subject coming later this morning), Microsoft alpha blogger Robert Scoble offers 12 reasons--such as start up costs, performance per dollar, no lock in, more scalable, more security, easier to customize--why Web 2.0 entrepreneurs say that they don't want to work with Microsoft software. It reads like an indictment of Microsoft's sins among the Web/open source/DIY (do it yourself) crowd.

Scoble doesn't debate the 12 points as you would expect, but goes on to say:

If you don’t get the right answers from Microsoft when it comes time to consider new Web technologies/methodologies/tools, er, if we don’t answer these points above, then I want you to run to the competition (and I’ll help you go there, just like I did when I helped run a camera store in the 1980s). And, when we bring services out, or bring new Web strategies out, I want you to trust us because we treated you right and gave you all the information.

We'll find out in an hour when Gates and Ozzie unveil something about services in San Francisco whether Microsoft has anything that those developers on the edge would consider worthy of consideration. Stay tuned...

Topic: Microsoft

Kick off your day with ZDNet's daily email newsletter. It's the freshest tech news and opinion, served hot. Get it.

Talkback

4 comments
Log in or register to join the discussion
  • It's the costly forced migrations by MS....

    that are the MOST painful & frustrating. It takes all management and planning out of your hands. And in some cases you can't even reasonably migrate (say from VB6 to VB.Net...it's just not reasonable...so you're stuck with a re-investment). Or say take C#...a better Java? a better C++...still, it's highly proprietary: lockin++.

    Not unlike IBM in the 70s...arrogant and stupid, customers be damned because we're making so much money NOW.
    mgardner
  • Does Dollar Bill believe his own mouth?

    I really wonder if Bill understands what's going on here. I think he REALLY believes that what he's doing is best for everyone and he REALLY doesn't understand what the fuss is about. He is the IT dictator that knows what's best for his people and requires NO input from any outside "factions". He REALLY isn't in this for the money anymore - he has more than enough. He is in this to mold the world into his own image (of IT). He is aided by millions of M$hills that follow his word lock, stock and barrel without ever questioning. This REALLY looks a lot like some German guy back in the 30s-40s . . .
    Roger Ramjet
    • There is an inherent conflict involved

      Making MORE money or giving customers what THEY want. Basically, Microsoft needs to come up with ways that make more money. So, it's not necessarily what is best for the customer.

      It's always the downfall of public companies.
      ordaj@...
  • Suicidal Billy?

    Is it just me or did MSFT shoot itself in the foot with a bungled presentation and then did Gates stand there and commit corporate suicide. I mean how do you hold two opposing strategies, one in each hand and not expect to get torn apart? Or have I missed something here?
    dahowlett@...