Solution to Congress' technological ineptitude: A comic book

Solution to Congress' technological ineptitude: A comic book

Summary: Today, the LA Times (by way of the Boston Globe) has a very well-written story that puts technology lawmaking into nearly perfect perspective for those who have no idea how bad things really are.  In a story headlined In Information Age, Congress struggles to get up to speed, Jim Puzzanghera writes:...

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Today, the LA Times (by way of the Boston Globe) has a very well-written story that puts technology lawmaking into nearly perfect perspective for those who have no idea how bad things really are.  In a story headlined In Information Age, Congress struggles to get up to speed, Jim Puzzanghera writes:

...Congress isn't exactly a haven for the tech-savvy. The alert to rush to the House floor was delivered in low-tech fashion -- by dated pagers clipped to their belts and clanging bells that made the halls of Capitol Hill echo like a 1950s high school....One of the leading gatekeepers for technology legislation, Senate Commerce Committee chairman Ted Stevens, Republican of Alaska, has been lampooned on TV and tech blogs after recently describing the Internet as ``a series of tubes." The lack of high-tech understanding is so pervasive on Capitol Hill that Vint Cerf, a Google Inc. executive known as a father of the Internet, is considering creating a comic book to show lawmakers how the global network operates.

I searched YouTube to see if it had any such lampooning clips.  Sure enough, there's no shortage of material that takes Stevens to task over his lack of technological intellect (a lot of which is brilliantly done by Jon Stewart):

How much do you think an autographed copy of that comic book would go for on eBay?

Topic: Social Enterprise

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  • The secret is in the art

    I think Cerf has the right idea, but I am not sure he is the one who can make it work. After all I still remember the year that Schlumberger included a comic book as part of their Annual Report. They wanted to confront the fact that many (most?) of their shareholders had not the foggiest idea of what their business did (other than make money); so they bet on the idea that a comic book would deliver the story in a way that would get shareholder attention and understanding. I do not know if they ever tried to assess how well this strategy worked.

    What Schlumberger was willing to recognize was that a comic book is an <i>art form</i> (not surprising given the number of serious art collectors in the Schlumberger family). Now Cerf has done a lot of good expository text, and he has some good intuitions for rhetoric. However, these are not necessarily the foundations of good comic book art. My advice is that he either collaborate or outsource!
    kitchen-cynic