Sun continues sailing its free and open course with DRM

Sun continues sailing its free and open course with DRM

Summary: Sun has lately been crowing lately about how it was the original open source company, and despite not jumping on or responding to the Linux open source movement until the last few years (OpenSolaris is a 2005 phenomenon), the company is now trying to claim its more open than thou status and touting community development.

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TOPICS: Oracle
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Sun has lately been crowing lately about how it was the original open source company, and despite not jumping on or responding to the Linux open source movement until the last few years (OpenSolaris is a 2005 phenomenon), the company is now trying to claim its more open than thou status and touting community development. In support of that initiative, and providing non-proprietary solutions for the planet, Sun is rolling out the Open Media Commons and Dream (DRM everywhere available) software under the CDDL license. Stephan Shankland has the story. I'll look to see what Sun's Open Source Office head Simon Phipps has to say about this latest initiative, and how Sun will convince Apple, Sony, Microsoft and others to join in...

Topic: Oracle

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  • Ever heard of Openlook?

    Sun offered its windowing system for free to anyone that would sign up. EVERYONE else went with Motif. I SUPPOSE you could call that "open" . . .
    Roger Ramjet
  • Dan, are you suggesting a "monoculture" would be good?

    I mean if everyone uses the same protection and one hacker breaks it... Blah, blah, blah...
    No_Ax_to_Grind
    • like passport

      :)
      JasonL31
  • Sun and open source.

    How pleased was Sun with Linux server software? ZDNet asserted in one article that the entire Unix losses to Linux were being suffered by Sun. That may be exaggerated, but there's no doubt that Sun has paid a heavy price, almost certainly far heavier than Microsoft, for the existence of open source.

    At the same time, the company can't afford to do all its development itself. Nor can they - or should they - prevent other companies from adapting a product like Java. So they have to keep a reputation as an open source supporter.

    Sooner or later the conflict has to be resolved.
    Do they give up some of the company's primary assets? Or do they lose ability to leverage free labor?

    Neither of those is a profitable choice for the company. This story is a recognition that Sun is a victim of open source, and there's a good question whether the company can survive being either generous or ungenerous.
    Anton Philidor