The applications of tomorrow

The applications of tomorrow

Summary: JP Rangaswami, the CIO at Dresdner Kleinwort Wasserstein who has caught the blogging bug, continues to post further on his four pillars of  enterprise application architecture (publishing, search, fulfilment and conversation). From yesterday's post: Is it time to think about an Intention Market [channeling Doc Searls] for information?

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TOPICS: Apps
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rangaswami.jpgJP Rangaswami, the CIO at Dresdner Kleinwort Wasserstein who has caught the blogging bug, continues to post further on his four pillars of  enterprise application architecture (publishing, search, fulfilment and conversation). From yesterday's post:

Is it time to think about an Intention Market [channeling Doc Searls] for information? Is that what syndication and alerts become? I declare my intention to acquire some form of information by subscribing to feeds and enriching the flow with profiling information and feedback loops; I discover them through some form of aggregator service, and then choose to transact with the information that best meets my interest.

The applications of tomorrow actually compete to give me the information I want the way I want it. They overlap in terms of content, but so what? We have applications today overlap, and we hire an army of people to keep it that way. It’s called reconciliation. They overlap in terms of functionality, but so what? They do that today, but we call it silo and regional thinking. And end-of-day reports is like telling tomorrow’s staff that the news can be seen at nine o’clock and at no other time.

The applications of tomorrow will have to deliver the content to a myriad of devices using a myriad of connection styles and types. 802.11 alphabet soup. And guess what, the devices won’t be locked down on to the desktop at the office either. These devices will probably be personalised and “skinned” and stickered and whatever else. Do you really want to look at the applications of today through mobile device form factors? Okay, I confess, I have seen people read spreadsheets on blackberry. But there’s a different answer to that. It’s called counselling.

Can you imagine rolling back the years and being a graduate wet-behind-the-ears and starting your first job, and being told you can only use company-issue pens? That’s what we will sound like when we tell tomorrow’s staff they must use our devices and our devices only.

And the price they will pay is their time and their attention.

Many companies developing so-called Web 2.0 products and services for businesses don't really see the bigger picture. JP's articulation of his four pillars and the applications of tomorrow is what they should be thinking about...  

Topic: Apps

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