The eternal question: Can Apple go enterprise?

The eternal question: Can Apple go enterprise?

Summary: Is there a grass-roots enterprise IT interest in Apple? NetworkWorld seems to think so and outlines a few key reasons why Apple could get traction in the enterprise.

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TOPICS: Apple
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Is there a grass-roots enterprise IT interest in Apple? NetworkWorld seems to think so and outlines a few key reasons why Apple could get traction in the enterprise. Among the reasons:

  • Apple is powered by Intel now.
  • Switching to OS X isn't any more difficult than moving to Vista.
  • And networking is easier on today's Macs compared to previous versions.

It all sounds perfectly logical. In fact, I've pondered how Apple could pierce the enterprise market before.

The catch? Apple just doesn't care about the enterprise unless it's narrowly defined as companies creating content--movies, publishing etc. NetworkWorld notes that Apple doesn't have a dedicated enterprise unit.

Why? Here's a theory. The enterprise market is crowded and a bit staid. Let's assume Apple gets into the enterprise market. Steve Jobs takes the stage at Macworld and says "here's our latest Xserve (above)!" The reaction would be silence.

There's just no interest. The iPhone is much sexier and makes Apple's lack of focus on the enterprise clear.

However, there are IT managers out there that would consider the Apple platform if only Jobs & Co. showed a smidge of interest. Maybe Apple should at least seed a grass-roots enterprise movement.

Topic: Apple

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6 comments
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  • vendor lock-in issue

    The biggest hurdle I see is that to choose Apple you lock yourself into a single vendor for both software *and* hardware. That's rarely a good idea.
    mosborne
    • Why put yourself on an island

      ---The biggest hurdle I see is that to choose Apple you lock yourself into a single vendor for both software *and* hardware.---

      If you're smart enough to incorporate Apple's products into your enterprise, you're also probably smart enough to set up a diverse system using a variety of products from a variety of vendors. I do understand the cost-savings of maintaining a monoculture, but they don't outweigh the long-term costs, one of which is, as you mention, lock-in.
      tic swayback
    • Well lets see...

      If you buy a Mainframe/AS400/AIX/SUN/HPUX you are locked into one vendor. But apparently these platforms are very popular.
      So I think your point is moot. Plus even when companies buy Windows they typically stay with one hardware manufacturer.
      mrlinux
  • Enterprise IT & Apple? Not very likely

    While I use a Mac myself, and have been involved in enterprise IT for over 25 years,
    it's not likely that there will be much movement to Apple. It might make some
    inroads, for the reasons you suggest, but Apple just seems to be defining itself as a
    consumer and niche (Graphics) company. The EIT market is too cutthroat, and I think
    that Apple has been doing just fine on shareholder value without getting into it.

    I do believe that the Vista upgrade cycle is a good time to consider it though.
    8string
  • They are planting the seeds

    Just check out this year's WWDC. For the first time Apple is promoting it for IT as
    much as for developers.
    YinToYourYang-22527499
  • The answer is found in a question

    Can OSX be virtualized? No? Then Apple can't go enterprise.

    Maybe intelligent people will take Jobs more seriously when he stops embedding a TPM DRM chip in all of his hardware.
    NonZealot