The future of movies

The future of movies

Summary: At a Churchill Club event on July 27, a group of movie industry executives discussed the emerging digital age of cinema. Issues surfaced included the changing relationships between studios, filmmakers, and the audience, as well as major trends and new business models driving the future of cinema.

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TOPICS: Browser, CXO
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churchilllogo.jpgAt a Churchill Club event on July 27, a group of movie industry executives discussed the emerging digital age of cinema. Issues surfaced included the changing relationships between studios, filmmakers, and the audience, as well as major trends and new business models driving the future of cinema. The panelists included:

  • Randal Kleiser, president, Randel Kleiser Productions and director of Grease, The Blue Lagoon, Honey I Blew Up the Kid, Lovewrecked
  • Bob Lambert, senior vice president, Worldwide Technology Strategy at The Walt Disney Company
  • Tim Partridge, senior vice president and general manager, Dolby Professional Division at Dolby Laboratories
  • Jerry Pierce, senior vice president of technology, Universal Pictures
  • Todd Wagner, CEO, 2929 Entertainment

The moderator was Scott Kirsner, editor of CinemaTech. You can download the hour and twenty minute podcast or listen via the embedded player.

Topics: Browser, CXO

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  • I don't think marketing will necessarily be an obstacle for small players

    There really needs to be a lot more competition in the entertainment industry. There are a number of indicators that this is the case: from the handful of prominent actors out there from a nation of almost 300 million people; to the industry?s insistence on trying to shove DRM down the throats of its customers ? over their vehement objections.

    I believe distribution shouldn?t be all that bad, as companies could set up computer networks where artists / production companies could upload their content, and these distribution companies could send out (artwork enhanced) RSS feeds about the content they hold, which could picked up by various companies that aggregate the feeds.

    Marketing may not be that much of a problem either. I believe just like in many other industries, where there are a range of players, from small, to medium, to large, who all make money, the entertainment industry should adjust its thinking and recognize that whether a small project makes a profit of $25,000 or a large one makes a profit of $250 M, both situations are fine ? just so long as they both make money. I therefore think that small players could successfully do marketing through online ads, where if a user clicks on an ad and downloads content, the site through which the consumer acquires the ad could get a cut of the profit. It may even be possible for small players to embed ads into their products, and let those ads cover the cost of their online ads.

    The above could actually allow small players to grow, and maybe branch out into other marketing models.

    I believe also artists should make it a standard practice properly sample their intended audiences from fairly early in their creative processes, to ensure that their efforts are properly directed.
    P. Douglas