The Supremes Rule Against Grokster

The Supremes Rule Against Grokster

Summary: The Supreme Court, in a unanimous decision this morning, ruled that "One who distributes a device with the object of promoting its use to infringe copyright ... is liable for the resulting acts of infringement by third parties using the device, regardless of the device's lawful uses.

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TOPICS: Legal
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The Supreme Court, in a unanimous decision this morning, ruled that "One who distributes a device with the object of promoting its use to infringe copyright ... is liable for the resulting acts of infringement by third parties using the device, regardless of the device's lawful uses." The case has been sent back to the lower court that ruled in favor of MGM in the first place for trial.

Here's some other resources on the case:

As the EFF piece states, the P2P genie is already out of the bottle.  This decision won't put it back in. 

Update: Denise Howell, Ernie Miller, and others (including Ted Olson) are commenting on the case on an ongoing "roundtable" hosted by the WSJ.

Topic: Legal

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8 comments
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  • Won't put it back?

    Hmmm, possibly but then a few law suits that bury the hosting web sites will go a long way...
    No_Ax_to_Grind
    • The point remains about the genie

      Stomping out P2P has not been effective. After every attempt new incarnations fill the void. Keep in mind I don't condone piracy. I merely try to view reality as it is. You can hate pirates, or you can despise them and wish them all suffering. But until one is willing to deal with the causes of piracy and not the technologies it uses, it will never be brought under control.
      Zinoron
      • Cause? That's simple, crooks prefer free.

        But then that has always been the case.
        No_Ax_to_Grind
    • You meant the ones outside the USA that aren't subject to US law? (nt)

      ..
      Letophoro
      • Stay tuned, more shoes to fall. (nt)

        .
        No_Ax_to_Grind
    • You're thinking perhaps of

      ones like these:

      http://torrents.gentoo.org/
      http://www.linuxisotorrent.com/
      http://oberon.zlynx.org/
      http://www.archive.org/
      ...

      Although not including Streamcast or Grokster, because they don't use hosting sites to seed distribution.

      Still haven't read the ruling, have you Don?
      Yagotta B. Kidding
  • not suprising

    Grokster played on the napster name, and was too
    mainstream. The supreme court can't really
    condone thieving that includes advertising or has
    a home base. It is sad however that the ruling
    will do little in foreign countries where not
    only do they download, but reproduce for profit.
    Until they get on the real problem, which is the
    producers of counterfit cd's etc. all they will
    do is further cut down market recognition of
    artists, since just in case you haven't noticed
    "it's not cool to listen to the radio"
    pesky_z
  • I disagree with the ruling against P2P

    To think that stopping the use of Grokster or any of the many other P2P networks is going to stop people from sharing information that is silly. I believe this is only one more means of censorship or controling the information highway. It is ironic that they allow spam and pop-ups with porn but let people share other information the rule against the people.
    agoodale@...