The United States of broadband: All of the speed is on the east coast

The United States of broadband: All of the speed is on the east coast

Summary: Akamai's state of the Internet report for the first quarter illustrates the distribution of broadband speeds in the U.S.

SHARE:
15

Akamai's state of the Internet report for the first quarter illustrates the distribution of broadband speeds in the U.S. The real speed appears to be on the east coast.

Here's the distribution of broadband in the top 10 states:

Akamai reports:

In looking at the ten states with the highest levels of high broadband connectivity, we find that the distribution of connection speeds above 5 Mbps generally follows a similar pattern. Unsurprisingly, the majority of the high broadband connections measure between 5-10 Mbps, with the next largest grouping between 10-15 Mbps. After that the faster ‘buckets’ struggle to achieve even 3% of connections, as shown in Figure 18. This distribution of speeds is not surprising, as most residential broadband options offer connections in the 5-15 Mbps downstream range, with higher speed options available only in limited areas or at significantly higher prices. We expect that as the adoption and rollout of DOCSIS 3.0 technology by cable Internet providers, as well as other FTTH initiatives by telecom providers, become more widespread that the percentage of connections in the highest ‘bucket’ will grow over time, and that competitive market pressures will drive providers to price the highest speed tiers of service at a level that subscribers find affordable.

Jason Perlow: Optimum Ultra: So how fast is it?

Here's a look at the states with the highest percentage of speeds topping 25 Mbps.

And here are the slowest states in the union.

Globally, however, the U.S. trails in broadband ranking at No. 33 in Akamai's first quarter tally. The good news: That's up from No. 35 in the fourth quarter.

Topics: Broadband, Networking, Telcos

Kick off your day with ZDNet's daily email newsletter. It's the freshest tech news and opinion, served hot. Get it.

Talkback

15 comments
Log in or register to join the discussion
  • Which is not surprising

    as the United States is the third most populated country in the world, with the third largest land mass per country (behind Canada and Russia), I would imagine it takes time and money to lay the infrastructure capable of offering high speed to the vast majority of people.

    GuidingLight
    • Exactly.....

      I never seem to read any reports that state that very fact. We probably have the most widely dispersed population in the world as well. You notice the top 10 countries in the world are smaller than most states in the U.S. I can also say I don't know of too many people complaining about their internet speeds and I am sure the telco's go by customer demand alot more than their want to throw down huge amounts of money to satisfy something no one is really complaining about on a large scale.

      I look forward to fiber into my home so the Phone company can offer me cable as well, but it costs huge amounts of money to fiber the whole city, but for now I have actually cut out the turbo roadrunner as it was a waste of money for me. In only certain situations will you need bandwidth over 10Mbps anyway. Heck my company has only a 10Mbps and we have many users and host our websites and such here. We have the option to go as high as we want with the fiber, but would just be a waste of cash.
      OhTheHumanity
    • Agreed

      Agreed - in a nation as large as ours, and with so many people living in farmland or otherwise low population areas, It would take considerable effort and costs to get the Internet to everybody.

      Think about it - you have a large area with a few farmers scattered around. Stringing new wires or fiber to those areas would probably cost huge sums of money they really can't afford. Is it worth it? The ROI just isn't there.
      CobraA1
      • Wrong!!!

        I live in farm country and Verizon has Fiber running across my land and yet we can not get hi speed internet.
        mrlinux
    • Nope

      [i]I would imagine it takes time and money to lay the infrastructure capable of offering high speed to the vast majority of people.[/i]

      Nice excuse, but the reality check bounces.

      In many of those low-speed States, broadband infrastructure for much higher speeds is already in place. The reason people don't use it is because they can't justify paying car-payment rates for getting to their megabyte limit faster.
      Yagotta B. Kidding
  • RE: The United States of broadband: All of the speed is on the east coast

    On the chart #3 says "West Virginia" but the line goes to Virginia.
    Doug0915
  • Verizon service areas are mostly in the East Coast

    Since Verizon's FiOS is the onlyUS broadband service that doesn't blow, and Verizon is predominantly concentrated in the North-East, this finding is not too surprising. See this map for ILEC distribution:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:RBOC_map.png
    fazalmajid
    • Optimum doesn't blow...

      I have Optimum Online - and I think the service is quite good. They get great marks from JDPowers and other rating sites. Verizon is good - no doubt, but not the only player in the game.
      Fark
    • And that is a problem for Verizon customer not on the East coast

      Because Verizon is focused on the North-East those of us who are Verizon customers in the Midwest cannot get FiOS or any broadband solution from them. I live 12 miles outside a major city in Ohio and Verizon cannot/will not provide me with DSL or FiOS even though the box up the street is wired with fiber back to the switching station. Their coverage maps for 3G are just bogus too, which indicate I would get a high quality 3G connection, but barely can get cell connection no less a data connection.
      Andrew Houghton
      • at least Verizon is proactive - Qwest has no FIOS plans

        At least with Verizon there is hope to get it in the future - Qwest doesn't offer it AT ALL in their markets and will not anytime soon - to quote their CEO, "It's too expensive. We don't see the return." AT&T's U-Verse (formerly Lightspeed, I believe) is mostly targeting TV and is mostly fiber-to-the-node as opposed to fiber-to-the-premises (so not geared toward broadband in the conventional sense) and is still fledgling.

        I live in a Qwest city and am about one mile from a first ring suburb CLEC. My choices are, in order of speed offered: Comcast, up to 50Mbps (for $100/month, or $63 for 22Mbps not including fees and taxes), Wireless phone providers (varies by provider, up to about 20Mbps, but starts around $100), DSL on Qwest or Covad backbones, maxes around 12Mbps, but due to shoddy lines in my area, I can get about 3 (and yes, my ISP told me the lines were bad - the girl I talked to on the phone said distance-wise I should qualify, but there was too much line noise).
        Clewin
  • Who knows their states?

    In figure 19, West Virginia is listed in the number 3 spot. Virginia is colored orange and labeled 3. Somebody needs to go back to geography class.
    firejeep508
    • Akamai corrected graphic

      I pinged them after your nice catch. They sent me a new report and I swapped the graphic. Hopefully this one points to the right Va.
      Larry Dignan
  • RE: The United States of broadband: All of the speed is on the east coast

    I live in rural Illinois and we have the worst of all worlds, slow
    speeds and Comcast as the only provider.
    gertruded
  • at least Verizon is proactive

    Maybe it is, maybe it's not. It's definitely NOT where customer care and Quality come into play! They figure if it weren't for customers, their jobs would be a lot easier!
    twaynesdomain-22354355019875063839220739305988
  • RE: The United States of broadband: All of the speed is on the east coast

    bnhanx,good post!
    dfwekrdfe56-24353621201615702709665493157816