U.S. CTO Chopra reportedly stepping down

U.S. CTO Chopra reportedly stepping down

Summary: UPDATE: The White House has released a statement confirming Chopra's departure.

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U.S. chief technology officer Aneesh Chopra is reportedly stepping down soon from his post after serving since 2009.

Although Chopra hasn't published a statement yet, FedScoop is reporting the news based on "sources close to the White House." It's not clear yet as to what Chopra will be doing next, although given that it's an election year, it could have something to do with that. (See update below.)

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The chief technology job commenced with the current administration to fall within the Office of Science and Technology Policy, although then Senator Obama detailed plans to introduce a U.S. CTO position as far back as 2007.

As described then, the CTO's duties include ensuring network safety nationwide as part of an interagency effort, improving online education and next-generation broadband networks, and oversee the development of a national, interoperable wireless network for local, state and federal first responders.

Before being hired as the federal CTO, Chopra served as the secretary of technology in Virginia from January 2006 to April 2009 and as managing director of the Advisory Board Company think tank before that.

Chopra's exit would follow that of Vivek Kundra, who left the U.S. chief information officer position for a gig at Harvard University last summer.

UPDATE: The White House has released a statement confirming Chopra's departure.

via The Washington Post

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Topics: Hewlett-Packard, Broadband, Health, Networking, Security, China, India, Wi-Fi

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  • Wireless is easy to hack, the curren open internet would be IP suicide

    (Intellectual Property)

    Anyone thinking of using off-the-shelf software and hardware with public infrastructure for anything top secret is a fool.

    Not to mention, wireless networks run far slower than wired ones... slower + easier to hack = bad decision making for "mission critical" work.
    HypnoToad72