Web titans gear up to battle over milliseconds

Web titans gear up to battle over milliseconds

Summary: Worth reading: John Markoff and Saul Hansell of the New York Times published one of those big picture stories,  "Hiding in Plain Sight, Google Seeks More Power," about how the Internet's epicenter is shaping up. Most of us have been focusing on the software battles--portals, Web applications, instant messengers, social networks.

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TOPICS: Google
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Worth reading: John Markoff and Saul Hansell of the New York Times published one of those big picture stories,  "Hiding in Plain Sight, Google Seeks More Power," about how the Internet's epicenter is shaping up. Most of us have been focusing on the software battles--portals, Web applications, instant messengers, social networks. But the larger battle is about power plants. As the NYT duo writes:

And odd as it may seem, the barren desert land surrounding the Columbia along the Oregon-Washington border — at the intersection of cheap electricity and readily accessible data networking — is the backdrop for a multibillion-dollar face-off among Google, Microsoft and Yahoo that will determine dominance in the online world in the years ahead.

Each company--Google, Yahoo, Microsoft in particular--have their own Manhattan projects, spending billions to build out infrastructure to support billions of users. Google supposedly has close to 500,000 servers; Microsoft expects to have 800,000 in use by 2011, according to the NYT story. It's a battle of nanoseconds and milliseconds--who can deliver the best performance...as well as overall user experience and services.

Topic: Google

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  • The race is on, Google and Yahoo will win, they are not hobbled by the need

    to use an insecure, buggy, OS that does not scale well for the infrastructure. Google and Yahoo can build on the collective smarts of the best and brightest arround the world. The guys at Microsoft are on an island all by themeselves trying to do it all. Well, MS will steal what it can from open source projecs that have BSD like licenses.
    DonnieBoy
  • Microsoft is running scared

    I talk to both Google and Mcirosoft for the company that I work at. Microsoft is playing the "we want an even playing field" whine and insisting on bringing in their tech teams to show what Microsoft's offerings are in comparison to Google. Microsoft insists on knowing exactly who will be in the room for the meting so they know who to send, and are being far more aggressive in only wanting to present to Senior-level IT. (taking one from the EMC playbook I guess) they bypass the people in the org who make the decision and sell the ideas to Senior management.

    Google - I love the way they work - "what do you want to cover in the meeting?" When we tell them, they respond "great - here are the people who can be there"

    Who do you think is getting my business??
    grillin_man
  • What does winning mean?

    What effect will all this have on our estimates of when global warming will start having serious effects on life on earth as we know it?
    kitchen-cynic
    • What's that shiny object floating in the water in front of me?

      Ok - I'll bite.

      No effect.

      Can't prove global warning with real scientific evidence and show a statistically significant change in global temperatures.

      It's basic - we don't have enough historical data to show anything. The earth _may_ have cycles of increasing temperatures followed by decreasing temperatures and those cycles _could_ be longer than we have measured.

      I'm open to true scientific evidence, not blind obedience to a few environmntal-types who spout what supports their position and ignores information to the contrary.
      grillin_man
      • Since the consequences are so dire, seems to me we should prove we are NOT

        headed for disaster, rather than continuing blindly on our current path.

        But, even then, the models of what happens when we burn lots of fossil fuels and put lots of hydrocarbons in the atmosphere are pretty clear.
        DonnieBoy
    • Well, in general, the distribution of information via networks instead of

      printing on paper and shipping in trucks is much better for the environment. Also, the free flow of information should mean that more will be informed about the consequences of global warming. And, finally, the global networks will make it easier to collect and analyze information showing progress of global warming.

      But, for some, there is much to be gained by denying global warming so that they can continue to pollute. Propaganda is alive and well as referenced by the other post.
      DonnieBoy
      • I concur

        you hit the nail on the head... as well, there are many things which are useless drains of energy, while this wouldn't have a negative impact on the environment... the energy would be used anyways, so, this will probably help the environment as people can get information on helping the environment easier, and faster, and in a better format.
        shryko