What happens when Google Reader goes dark?

What happens when Google Reader goes dark?

Summary: Earlier today Google Reader was completely unavailable, and it's still acting flaky, which means finding out what is going on in the world I track requires visiting a lot of Web sites that I ordinarily consume in the RSS reader. Net result, my time is wasted surfing the Web for what I get in my feeds.

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TOPICS: Google, Browser
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Earlier today Google Reader was completely unavailable, and it's still acting flaky, which means finding out what is going on in the world I track requires visiting a lot of Web sites that I ordinarily consume in the RSS reader. Net result, my time is wasted surfing the Web for what I get in my feeds. It's like cutting grass with scissors instead of a lawn mower.

This situation brings up to issues. First, it surfaces dependencies on services that are not as reliable. Google is not the only culprit--Yahoo, salesforce.com, and others have performance issues and outages. It turns out the serving millions or billions of transactions per day is not without challenges.

Quality of service is not a part of the Web 2.0 credo.

Services should come with a disclaimer, e.g., Google does not guarantee that the service will be available. At least it is free, but I would be willing to pay for a quality of service that would guarantee a certain level of uptime--such as 99.999 uptime. For reference, three nines (99.9 percent uptime) is 8.76 hours of downtime per year, and five nines is downtime of less than 5.26 minutes per year.

Secondly, you need a back up of RSS feed targets. Keep an up-to-date OPML file on hand so you can crank up an RSS reader from a service that isn't down.

My most recent message from Google Reader:

goorrss2.jpg

Topics: Google, Browser

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9 comments
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  • Oh please..

    Get a grip. Its a "Google Labs" product, which means that by using it you are aware that you are testing it - its not a finished product. One could argue that Google has left the Beta label on things so long as to render the term meaningless, but this is even further removed than that.

    Use a finished product, or dont complain when a free Beta fails.
    starlily@...
    • Quote

      Labs.google.com, Google's technology playground.
      Google labs showcases a few of our favorite ideas that aren't quite ready for prime time. Your feedback can help us improve them. Please play with these prototypes and send your comments directly to the Googlers who developed them.
      starlily@...
  • labs

    You're right ...Reader is Labs....but its not clear what Labs, Beta etc means anymore....partly an excuse for products that are unreliable. Up until today, I have had no problems with Reader. The larger is issue is pay for better quality of service.
    dbfarber
    • Labs = Alpha

      Looks like "LABS" is Google's way of referring to products that are still in development but not yet feature-complete. Most places call that "alpha." I wouldn't expect an alpha product to work at all, and I wouldn't be upset when one craps out on me.
      genericman
  • Must be missing somethng

    I get all of my RSS feeds in FireFox. What's so special about Google's RSS Reader?
    jacarter3
    • Don't be such a cry baby.

      Theres nothing worse than listening to someone whine about some free service They're not getting. Theres no such thing as perfect uptime anyway. Its likely that if you subscribe to other feeds they'll be down at some point.
      DemonX
      • I promise not to cry any more

        Fell better?
        jacarter3
  • Try My Yahoo

    It's about the best thing on the web.
    vankuvr@...
  • I use outlook

    I get my feeds through outlook. If they don't come they don't come. Besides if your RSS are down for a minute wouldn't that leave some evtra time to get actual work done
    bergmystr