What's your going rate? IT work orders by state

What's your going rate? IT work orders by state

Summary: OnForce, an information technology labor marketplace, has rolled out a new feature called MarketView that answers a simple question: What are you worth? MarketView puts IT labor into a stock market presentation and classifies workers by region and category.

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TOPICS: Unified Comms
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OnForce, an information technology labor marketplace, has rolled out a new feature called MarketView that answers a simple question: What are you worth?

MarketView puts IT labor into a stock market presentation and classifies workers by region and category. 

For instance, the 90-day average work order for an IT support worker in Alabama was $137. In Arkansas, that average work order is $203. The national average is $145.

OnForce also broke out some key trends in technology services:

  • According to MarketView's Hourly Rate Index, Maine, West Virginia and Vermont are the most expensive states for on-site IT service. California, Ohio and New Jersey are among the least expensive states per hour.
  • Work orders are accepted in as little as 3 minutes in states such as South Carolina, Ohio and Florida, where technician coverage is dense. Median time to acceptance is lengthier in states with fewer providers, such as Wyoming, Alaska and Delaware.
  • The VoIP and Consumer Electronics categories are among the most expensive work order categories, nearly doubling the average price of the POS and Printer categories.

By category, operating specialists on OnForce had an average 90-day work order of $622 in New Jersey. Workers in Oregon had an average work order rate of $529 followed by Utah at $429. Colorado was among the last for OS support workers with a 90-day average order of $82. And there's no work via OnForce in Alaska, Montana, South Dakota, Delaware and Puerto Rico.

IT workers specializing in "network devices and service" did best in South Carolina with a 90-day average work order of $448. Texas came in at $380 followed by $320 in Wyoming. The national average was $192.

Workers focused on hardware services had an relatively low average 90 work order tally of $129. The rates across the country were tightly coupled with New Jersey having the highest average work order of $167.

In contrast, VOIP is the place to be. The highest average 90-day work order was in Maine at $879, followed by $608 in Idaho and $445 in Utah. The national average for VOIP work orders was $224.

Topic: Unified Comms

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5 comments
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  • "You get what you pay for".

    Maybe that's why Best Buy and all these Indian companies are proving how accurate that phrase is?

    Not to mention Circuit City summarily firing long-term, high-paid workers but offering them to rehire them for the same jobs at a much reduced fare? (I'd rather take the UI benefits. :( )
    HypnoToad72
    • However...

      ... (I'd rather take the UI benefits.) - you do realize that UI is less than 50% of your average pay and only lasts 6 months? (Believe me, I work for EDD in California)

      You are better off taking that stupid job and looking elsewhere while still employed. Studies show that more new employees are being hired from working applicants than non-working applicants.

      Take your chances depending on where you are, or, if you have a lot of cash backing you up, open a one-person Tech Shop. I am sure that many of the posters here could do a better tech support job than the average Geek Squad employee:

      Customer: "Hello, Geek Squad? My Windows computer is slow and sometimes won't boot unless I cycle it several times. What should I do?"

      Geek Squad: "Do you have your Windows Recovery CD handy? If yes, insert the CD and select the option to reinstall. That will be $100 please."
      Confused by religion
    • Hmmm,

      In the case of Circuit City I suspect I'd have to have a discussion with the local labor relations board and see about bringing an action for dismissal without cause...let's see how paying me a year's pay and giving me my job back at my old pay would suit them.
      maldain
  • IT work orders by state & OnForce

    I signed up my company to work with OnForce in the state of Texas. The work orders I was sent had an average flat fee of $50. You were paid $50 to pick up a part at Fed Ex and then go to the client site and install it. The largest amount I ever was paid was $800 a week to assist with an AT&T rollout for a two week period. Where did OnForce get these numbers? It certainly was not from their own offerings.
    dgerhardt@...
  • RE: What's your going rate? IT work orders by state

    I agree that you get what you pay for. For $40.00 or $50.00 to pick up parts , replace them at customers location and then make another trip to return parts is not a fair compensation. The techs that take these calls for the miserable amount of $40-50.00 are mostly kids living at home with mom and pop who need money to take their dates to the movies and buy pop corn, not serious seasoned professionals. Don't get stuck in a low demanding skill, get certifications and educate yourself to gain more respect in the field.
    solcar