Who's buying into Web 2.0 technologies?

Who's buying into Web 2.0 technologies?

Summary: If you are selling Web 2.0 tools, Forrester recommends targeting companies with more than 1,000 employees.

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If you are selling Web 2.0 tools, Forrester recommends targeting companies with more than 1,000 employees. In a recent survey of companies of all sizes, Forrester found that larger enterprises are almost twice as likely to pilot or deploy Web 2.0 technologies in 2008 compared to the small and medium flavors.

"The Web 2.0 Buyer Profile: 2008" ($279) author Oliver Young concluded that "the soft business value of Web 2.0 is clearly a larger deterrent in SMBs than in the enterprise. Most SMBs have neither the brand cachet to sustain customer communities nor the distributed workforce to necessitate a Web 2.0 collaboration deployment."

However, more than 75 percent of the survey respondents have no plans to invest in wikis, blogs, RSS, tagging, podcasts or social networking tools.

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The report indicated that application integration and management and SOA and master data management are top priorities for IT investments. Only 10 percent of respondents viewed Web 2.0 as a critical priority, and only 6 percent considered software-as-a-service or open source expansion as critical priorities.

Implementing a collaboration strategy was considered a priority or critical priority by 59 percent of respondents. Given that collaboration increasingly involves Web 2.0 technologies, interest in deploying Web 2.0 may may be higher than the report indicates.

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Topics: Browser, Collaboration

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3 comments
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  • Duhh

    So here is the key sentence that shows what's wrong here:

    "The report indicated that application integration and management and SOA and master data management are top priorities for IT investments."

    Do small and medium sized companies even run these tools through IT or consider them IT investments vs. marketing investments?

    Chris Baggott
    www.compendiumblogware.com
    chris@...
    • IT investments

      The report was referring the large enterprise on that issue...
      DF
      dbfarber
  • I think this Forrester report is plain wrong...

    and condescending to SMBs to boot. You don't need "brand cachet" to collaborate with your customers in communities. And my small business (and those of my small clients) have *very* distributed workforces--necessitating even more than big companies "Web 2.0 collaboration deployment".

    I question the survey's methodology. Which companies were surveyed? Did Forrester survey only the IT deparment head, i.e., the last guy line managers would tell about their excellent inexpensive $99/month wiki? etc). Many, many (especially new) companies use wikis and online collaboration tools to run their businesses. Most of these services are inexpensive (or even free). The majority of businesses using collaborative software are SMEs (small and medium enterprises). They???re part of what 37signals calls the ???Fortune 5,000,000???. But my guess is that this Forrester report does not count Basecamp (for project management and collaboration) as a Web 2.0???since it does not neatly fit into one of their Web 2.0 boxes of ???wiki???, ???blog???, ???tagging or metatagging???, ???podcast??? or ???social networking tool???. And there are hundreds of thousands of start-ups and SMEs using other enterprise wikis and colloboration tools, like:Zoho, Google Apps, Clearspace, Traction Teampage, Atlassian Confluence, Onesite, Socialtext, Central Desktop, Brainkeeper, Neartime, Wetpaint, ProjectSpaces, Blogtronix, PlanHQ, Joint Contact, Zimbra, Project360, Mindtouch, Community server.org, Citadel, Airset, Systemone, ProjectForum, Taskbin, Firestoker and 37signals other tools (Highrise, Backpack, Campfire). And even Sharepoint will be installed in a fair number of medium size enterprises (and even some small ones). And I???d guess that that the great majority of SMEs use Skype for long-distance voice/video and messaging???for collaboration.

    I'm disappointed ZDNet reports on this Forrester report so uncritically.

    This is not the only expensive expert reports from Forrester that seems "off". (I just read a slew on CRM, several of which left me scratching my head.) Non-expert researchers peddle statistics and buzz concepts to executives in big companies who know even less about these topics than they do: in the land of the blind, the one-eyed man is king???

    The irony is that Web 2.0 threatens to disintermediate Forrester and others like them, especially if they publish ???findings??? of this quality???
    dan.carew@...