WiMax deployments ramp globally, but U.S. lags

WiMax deployments ramp globally, but U.S. lags

Summary: WiMax appears to be a hit around the world---except for the U.S., according to deployment data released by the WiMax Forum Monday.

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TOPICS: Mobility, Wi-Fi
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WiMax appears to be a hit around the world---except for the U.S., according to deployment data released by the WiMax Forum Monday.

WiMax, also known as 4G, now is offered on networks covering 620 million people in 147 countries, said the WiMax forum. By the end of 2010, 800 million people will be covered with 1 billion by the end of 2011. The 2011 time frame is notable because that's when long-term evolution networks, a WiMax rival technology, will begin to ramp.

The data, however, indicates that WiMax is a global effort, but lags in North America. For instance, Clearwire is the main champion of WiMax in the U.S. and largely responsible for the deployments. Clearwire has some big backers like Intel, Google and others and partners like Comcast and Sprint, but can't carry the load by itself.

Here's a look at WiMax Forum's data (statement) by region:

  • Asia Pacific: 237 million people covered and 100 network deployments.
  • Central/Latin America: 113 million people covered and 109 deployments.
  • Africa/Middle East: 108 million people covered with 142 deployments.
  • Europe: 115 million people with 153 deployments.
  • North America: 47 million people with 51 deployments.

And a look via WiMax maps:

Clearwire expects that it will have 120 million people covered by the end of 2010 so there will be some catching up underway.

Topics: Mobility, Wi-Fi

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11 comments
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  • At least we have it (nt)

    nt
    CobraA1
  • Better to skip WiMax and go straight for LTE. (nt)

    nt
    Bruizer
  • RE: WiMax deployments ramp globally, but U.S. lags

    What does the word 'covered' means? 'In service' only or including 'in deployment / planned'?
    sjjung72
  • Reason why the US always gets it last because..

    Corporations like to milk their customers dry for everything they can instead of giving their customers the best experience to keep them as loyal customers.
    lenohere
    • thats funny cause they charge more for WiMax

      and you have to purchase new equipment to use it.

      So if they really wanted to milk customers, they would deploy the new technology and then immediately turn off the old stuff so as to force people into buying new equipment and into higher rate plans.
      otaddy
      • You're half right.

        The money is in the rate plans, not the new equipment. Moreover, they can't "immediately" turn off the old plan because they have so many unhappy souls locked into it for several years. Nor would they want to. The money is just cascading in from those locked-in users.

        I looked in to 3G. The contract offered, the usage offered, the amount charged, and the carrier's behavior were all so suspect that I ran the other way as fast as I could.

        The most pathetic kind of sucker is the guy who doesn't even understand it's being done to him.
        nikacat
  • As long as its just for cell phones, who cares?

    No one I can think of.
    No_Ax_to_Grind
    • Just for cell phones?

      Initially it was rolled out with data service only modems...you would then have to run Voip over that to get voice.

      But during the transition, hybrid devices are needed that can fall back (in Sprint's case) to their legacy CDMA and EvDO networks.
      otaddy
  • I'm 100 Percent Clear

    I've been a Clear customer for more than 2 years now, and I snapped up the deal for Pick 2 (home and mobile) when they ramped up to full Wimax in December (I've clocked my mobile as high as 11Mbps).

    I just bought an ASUS eee PineTrail (long battery life) Win7 netbook and carry it and the Clear dongle modem everywhere (trains, coffee places, malls).

    Works great -- I can even watch high res video from Netflix on the train!
    jabailo1
  • God rid of my landline

    When I moved last year I realized I could get WiMax, XOHM then, now CLEAR, and drop my landline.

    Everyone in my household uses a mobile phone as their primary communication device. The only reason we had a landline was for broadband acccess. The cost of WiMax is the same that I was paying on top of my landline. Drop the landline, save money.
    Vondo
  • RE: WiMax deployments ramp globally, but U.S. lags

    I live in one of the 29 states that has NO presence of Wi-
    Max/Clearwire at all. When I first heard about Wi-Max it was
    touted as the end-all/be-all way the carriers were finally
    going to be able to span the US with full coverage since the
    signal would travel easily much farther than cellphone
    signals, even in rural areas, yet from looking at the maps,
    they are only concerned with the major metropolitan areas as
    usual, and those of us more than 20 miles from one of the
    biggest cities are just out of luck.
    ggore