Sun changes stock ticker to JAVA

Sun changes stock ticker to JAVA

Summary: Sun Microsystems announced that it will change its Nasdaq stock ticker symbol from SUNW to JAVA. The purpose of the change is to leverage the widespread brand awareness of Java to promote other things that Sun does. "This isn't about changing the company name or focus," says CEO Jonathan Schwartz. "But we are no longer simply a workstation company, nor a company whose products can be limited by one category - and Java does a better job of capturing exactly that sentiment than any other four letter symbol."

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TOPICS: Oracle, Open Source
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Sun Microsystems has announced that it will change its Nasdaq stock ticker symbol from SUNW to JAVA. The stock ticker change will go into effect on Monday, August 27, 2007. From the press release:

Sun today generates license revenues from Java technology, but more significantly derives revenue from the software, storage, servers, services and microelectronics that power the datacenters behind global Java deployments - whether on handsets, personal computers, or in the network. Sun believes its business is advantaged by such exposure, and the change in ticker symbol more effectively connects it with the marketplace.

Jonathan Schwartz has more to say in his blog:

Granted, lots of folks on Wall Street know SUNW, given its status as among the most highly traded stocks in the world. But SUNW represents the past, and its not without a nostalgic nod that we've decided to look ahead.

To be very clear, this isn't about changing the company name or focus... But we are no longer simply a workstation company, nor a company whose products can be limited by one category - and Java does a better job of capturing exactly that sentiment than any other four letter symbol.

I know I talk about Java a lot here in this blog, but that's because after years of developing in C, Java feels like programmer heaven. I've used C#, Ruby, Perl, Python, ... you name it, but my first choice for any large or long-lived coding project is Java.

Topics: Oracle, Open Source

Ed Burnette

About Ed Burnette

Ed Burnette is a software industry veteran with more than 25 years of experience as a programmer, author, and speaker. He has written numerous technical articles and books, most recently "Hello, Android: Introducing Google's Mobile Development Platform" from the Pragmatic Programmers.

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7 comments
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  • Read comments on jonathans blog

    I see this as a big waste of money but then again Im not a marketing person.

    The comments on Jonathans Blog are similar. Many are ticked off that they spend money like this after laying off many people.

    Java's bearable thanks to Netbeans. Swing is just horrid and I'd be dead without the GUI editor. I guess I was spoiled with Visual Studio and C#.
    otaddy
  • ... but my first choice for any large or long-lived coding project is Java

    how sad of you
    markbn
    • Support the decision

      In today's enterprise IT environment we have three language choice: C, Java and C#.

      For managed code the choice is between Java Application Servers and C#/.NET
      framework.

      For those of use that don't simply support windows boxes the choice is clear - Java.
      Why restrict yourself to windows when it is not the best OS for many server
      applications?
      Richard Flude
      • That's why I had to move to Java

        The apps I write need to run on Win and Slowaris so Java is a natural. I hated leaving Visual Studio but I understand the motivation behind the decision.
        otaddy
      • RE: Support the decision

        =========
        Why restrict yourself to windows when it is not the best OS for many
        server applications?
        =========

        I did not say anything about Windows. This clearly reveals your
        biases: "Anything but Microsoft"


        =========
        In today's enterprise IT environment we have three language choice:
        C, Java and C#.
        =========

        You said " but my first choice for any large or long-lived coding
        project is Java.". Now you say it is *only* for "IT environments"? Most
        useful (commercial or not) SW is not coded in Java at all, at least not
        the main products: Office (MS's, Sun's, Apple's), Browsers, etc. C is
        popular but you forgot about C++ (firefox anyone?). Your comments
        seem misleading.

        =========
        For those of use that don't simply support windows boxes the choice
        is clear - Java.
        =========

        zzzzz, nope. It depends I guess. I do not know how mature is mono
        at this point, but they are progressing fast, for example, this Beagle
        search engine included in Suse. It shows C#/.Net is capable of doing
        nice things. So , no, Java is not your only/clear choice if you don't use
        Windows. It depends on the task and personnel's skills amont other
        myriad of factors.

        The only area where I see Java is really (I mean really) nice to use is
        for mobile code: even objects in Java can travel across the NW, not
        only web Applets of course. This is cool, indeed.
        markbn
        • Oops

          I confused you with Burnette

          But anyway, my comments still apply. He is talking about coding
          projects in general.
          markbn
          • Which projects

            Just to clarify, I don't code everything in Java. For example I've used Ruby and Python for some "one-off" projects, and I've used Perl and TCL more than I'd care to admit. But Java and C# have certain features that make them good choices for "large or long-lived coding projects" in my opinion (like packages and visibility). And since I usually need to write portable code Java is the winner for me.

            Of course my choice used to be C/C++ a few years ago, and a few years from now it might be something else. Never stop learning and exploring.
            Ed Burnette