Firefox inches towards 50%, Safari holds steady

Firefox inches towards 50%, Safari holds steady

Summary: These are the kind of stats that should make the Mozilla folks very happy. According to W3Schools data, Firefox climbed to 46.

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These are the kind of stats that should make the Mozilla folks very happy. According to W3Schools data, Firefox climbed to 46.4% in February, while the various versions of IE dropped by 1.2% to 43.6%. Granted, this is skewed towards developers, but most sources agree that IE is on a downward slope.

Market Share shows Moz up again in February by a slim .14% to 21.77%, while IE dropped again by .11% to 67.44%. I'm sure Microsoft is hoping to boost their stats with IE8, but the enthusiasm for another Explorer release seems to be lacking.

If it weren't for Safari being strategic for the iPhone, I'd say that Apple ought to just kill Safari and embrace Firefox. (Well, with Fennec, they ought to anyway...) According to W3Schools, Safari is holding steady at 3%, despite being available for Windows in addition to Mac OS X. Market Share shows Safari at a more respectable 8.02%, but dropping from January.

The best news of all is for users who don't do Windows: A shrinking market share for IE means that Web developers should be thinking about writing for Web standards, not for a specific browser.

Topics: Browser, Apple, Microsoft, Operating Systems

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95 comments
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  • Firefox is the one and only

    If only for the add-ons. Adblock Plus, NoScript, MediaPlayerConnectivity. NoSquint on my netbook.

    Nevertheless, I occasionally use Epiphany and even Opera (I hate Opera's GUI though). Mainly for viewing websites that refuse to work properly in Firefox.
    pjotr123
  • Write for Firefox and forget IE

    Non-technical people buy apps that require IE, and purchase a lot of garbageware in which it ONLY works with IE.

    The days of the 'Wormdows' empire is not sustainable foundation cracks have developed into major breaches and you will see this continue on.

    Open Source technologies is advancing 100 times faster than a closed source monolithic bug ridden code that only Hackers & Virus writers understand...

    ;)
    Christian_<><
    • Not Necessarily

      Firefox is doing well, but I'm not sure that OpenSource in general is happily advancing to world domination. In case you hadn't noticed, Sun has been in the news lately, and not in a good way. The world's largest (and one of it's most innovative) OpenSource company is slowly dying the death of no revenue plan. If IBM or another company purchases them, I'm not sure that is a good thing.

      Their existing IP will be swallowed, and a new corporation will find itself the copywrite holder to a tremendous amount of GPL code. While I assume that intentions would be (mostly) beneficient, that new company can wreak a lot of havoc.
      ________________________________

      <a href="http://www.oak-tree.us/blog">Oak-Tree.us/Blog</a>
      Rob Oakes
      • In case you haven't noticed.

        Open Source is independent of any company. The code lives on no matter what happens to the company. In other words, as more code joins Open Source it can only grow. Sort of like the "Hotel California". You can check in anytime you like but you can never leave.
        kozmcrae
        • Re: In case you haven't noticed

          Yes, that is true SUN will survive and live on as the Linux distro's continue to grow in usage.

          The market is hot for open_source technologies, since it is really in it infancy and Microsoft is at its pinnacle.


          Really when you stop and think about it, look at the growth of Red Hat, I have to say from my view point a 'hobby' became a career once I went the open source route and I got my RHCE.

          Firefox was once ridiculed like the Linux distro's are now being treated as 3rd class operating systems.

          The key fact is innovation and the fact the community (as I do) work to make it better. People want to contribute, and it is not communist by any means, I make a good salary due in part of the community effort and assistance in helping others solve problems. If a problem is found it is not hidden, it is evaluated and either a fix or workaround is created.


          Closed source software is a dead end, it is too costly to center a business around and not innovative, plus you cannot create your own destiny.

          ;)
          Christian_<><
          • In case you hadn't noticed....

            Linux marketshare is still <1% of total. <br><br>
            We've heard many before you declare it the time of open source and that Microsoft is dead, as though that would be a good thing. <br><br>
            Zealots like you do nothing more than be purposely devisive and ignorant about something you don't understand.<br><br>
            Btw, who pays your salary? Do tell. And if it's as a service person working on linux sites, isn't departing of knowledge supposed to be free? Isn't that why Linux based OSes are free, a twisted logic that claims knowledge has no price tag? <br>
            Yet those same hypocrites will charge exhorbanant amounts to help the small number of sites and people using Linux. That is totally contradictory. <br>
            The truth of it is, more than their belief that open source is best....as it's clearly not, unless you are going to tell me the recent articles, some half of the magazine from respected publications are all wrong when they say Linux is still far off from mainstream adoption. The fact is there is no real integration or software up the software stack that works seamlessly with any version of Linux and people don't want the risk of something that is not backed by anyone in reality. <br>
            Sure Redhat will charge you more over 5 years than it costs for windows servers over 5 years for service, in fact you have to buy it, but they can't be held responsible for the code. They don't own it. <br>
            The code is owned by people all around the world, and the copyright holders are spread so far and wide it would be impossible to hold someone responsible for crappy software.
            With Server 2K8 and win7 and the whole host of technologies coming out of Redmond, it's clear the open source community still has many decades left to catch up. <br>
            I defy you to name one thing that has been "innovated" inside of the open source community as well. Fill me in on that, along with who pays your salary.
            <br>
            ;)
            xuniL_z
          • re: Linux marketshare is still <1% of total.

            <blockquote>re: Linux marketshare is still <1% of total.</blockquote>

            Market share, yes. Most computers are sold with a choice of any operating system you want, so long as it's Windows. A lot of Linux installs are counted as Windows sales because the machines shipped with Windows and are being reformatted, replacing Windows with Linux. When Linux is purchased or downloaded most Linux distributions can be installed to 1, 2, 10, or 1000 machines. When it's downloaded, 0 sales are counted. So, the market share is based on what? Units sold preinstalled? Does it count actual deployments? How are you arriving at that low 1% figure?
            kimvette
          • Re: In case you hadn't noticed....

            "Btw, who pays your salary? Do tell. And if it's as a service person working on linux sites, isn't departing of knowledge supposed to be free? Isn't that why Linux based OSes are free, a twisted logic that claims knowledge has no price tag?

            Yet those same hypocrites will charge exhorbanant amounts to help the small number of sites and people using Linux. That is totally contradictory."

            Knowledge is free. My time and skills are not.

            I seldom find myself working on linux boxes of late, but when I do, it's at the same fee I charge for windows boxes.

            I charge not for the knowledge I hold - I freely discuss the issues with the clients - but for the service I provide and the time I spend. I am more than willing to show an end user how to fix their own problems, assuming they're not more likely to destroy everything in the process due to a lack of skill/understanding.

            In fact I encourage this. It frees me to tackle more difficult issues or better yet work on new installations/implementations!

            This is what makes me a good tech - and a desirable one for my clients. Keeping secret the tools of the trade is more likely to get you replaced in this industry. Everyone has access to Google. Everyone has access to the world and the bulk of the tools you use. If you wont share, someone else will.
            goldenpanther
      • Hello Rob Oakes,

        IBM is Open Source / FOSS etc, friendly .
        It is a great supporter because it helps in its fight with MS.

        They made a big mistake back in 1981, with the deal that gave MS the biggest gift in history.
        They allowed MS to get rich on the back of IBM's reputation for quality.

        For years PC magazine had on its cover "The Independent Guide to IBM standard personal computing".

        It changed in Oct. 1990 to " The independent guide to personal computing", when it had become obvious that personal computing was no longer controlled be IBM.
        Bill Gates had a field day after IBM's blunder, as software was where the pot of gold was found.

        IBM must want very much to even the score.

        elderlybloke
    • Write for W3C and remember everybody.

      Write for W3C and remember everybody. The purpose of writing web pages is to make your information and services available to all people. The purpose is not to alienate them for their browser choices.

      Been running Windows for most of my computing, and haven't had an active worm or virus in years. Vista and Windows 7 have really hit the security nail in the head - they're far better than previous versions of Windows were.
      CobraA1
    • You know, any point you made...

      ...is severely diminished by your attempted use of idiotic "name-slams" like "Wormdows".

      Lose that, and you might be taken a bit more seriously.
      Hallowed are the Ori
  • Things will only get worse for IE. It's reputation precedes it.

    M$ used IE for so long as a weapon in their war on computing that it backfired and now all they can do is try to limit the damage.

    The tide has turned and it is washing away everything M$.
    InAction Man
    • Careful now you will get M$ followers angry

      Some 'point & clickers' get extremely angry when you disrupt their empire of 'Wormdows' 'Virus-Exchange' and Office-ripoff...

      When you wipe out 'Wormdows' with a virus free Linux distro they go to the unemployment line.

      A company can buy new hardware for what they waste on M$ (untold outages from viruses/worms/trojans/malware) that NO one can tell me how much Conficker costed people I am sure MILLIONS of dollars.

      Linux distro's are powering servers, they are infiltrating the desktop market, slow but steady.

      Just like Firefox it was once laughed at, now it is 50% just like desktop Linux laugh right now, your Wormdows skills are a dime a dozen.
      Christian_<><
      • Linux is what?

        Did I hear you correctly in saying that Linux is infiltrating the desktop? OMG! I guess Cuba is also taking over the U.S. slowly and steadily, huh?? :-)
        Tiggster
        • SHHH! It's a 'secret' invasion!

          I love the conspiracy theory nuts like the first two in this thread. Self delusion never ceases to amaze me.

          I have an assortment of browsers, and I use all of them. Why? Because inevitably, one of the craps out in regards to one task or another.
          Spiritusindomit@...
        • Keep your head in the sand all day if you want.

          Say hi to Bullmer while you're down there.
          Amelioration
        • Hello Tiggster,

          Many a true word is spoken in gest.
          elderlybloke
      • Not

        [i]Linux distro's are powering servers, they are infiltrating the desktop market, slow but steady. [/i]

        http://news.zdnet.com/2100-9595_22-279551.html

        According to the article, they are slowly and steadily losing the netbook market.
        MGP2
        • Desktop != netbook (NT)

          .
          kozmcrae
          • Don't split hairs....

            We're talking desktop OS, as opposed to servers.
            MGP2