Asetek liquid cools, overclocks 2.8GHz Apple Mac Pro because it can

Asetek liquid cools, overclocks 2.8GHz Apple Mac Pro because it can

Summary: When they're not creating liquid cooling solutions for OEM partners or for component makers like Corsair, the folks at Asetek like to water cool computers for the hell of it. A couple of months ago, the company released a video that showed how it liquid cooled an all-in-one PC, and now it's back with another project (and video): liquid cooling and overclocking a Mac Pro, ostensibly to reduce its noise level.

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TOPICS: Apple, CXO, Hardware
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When they're not creating liquid cooling solutions for OEM partners or for component makers like Corsair, the folks at Asetek like to water cool computers for the hell of it. A couple of months ago, the company released a video that showed how it liquid cooled an all-in-one PC, and now it's back with another project (and video): liquid cooling and overclocking a Mac Pro, ostensibly to reduce its noise level.

Asetek started with an older 2.8GHz Mac Pro, custom building the cooling solution that included two pumps and a 120mm radiator. The system was overclocked using ZDNet Clock, a utility developed by our compatriots at ZDNet.de. (More info here.) Temperature, noise level, and performance on the CineBench benchmark test were measured for this Mac Pro as well as a newer 3.2GHz version with stock air cooler.

The results? While temperatures for both were similar (47 degrees Celsius), the older Mac Pro nearly matched its newer sibling on the benchmark (7.45 vs. 7.46) and the difference in noise was substantial: the liquid cooled Mac Pro output 37.5 decibels, compared to 50 decibels from the later model.

Asetek claims it's not working on specific liquid cooling parts for Macs, and told me that it might be possible for DIY types to buy a couple of Corsair H50 liquid cooling systems (which were developed with Asetek) and use them with a Socket 1366-based Mac Pro, though it would require custom mounting. Ironically, Apple did offer liquid cooling on the Power Mac G5 several years ago, but hasn't built newer systems with anything other than air cooling.

Check out the video below to find out more about Asetek's latest experiment.

Topics: Apple, CXO, Hardware

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14 comments
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  • RE: Asetek liquid cools, overclocks 2.8GHz Apple Mac Pro because it can

    Liquid cooling systems are great .. As long as they don't leak. Apple found that out the hard way.
    kenosha77a
    • RE: Asetek liquid cools, overclocks 2.8GHz Apple Mac Pro because it can

      @kenosha7777


      So I hear. If you see a Mac G5 on eBay that says it's a dual 2.5Ghz... consider the cost of updating the cooling pump before bidding.

      Some people have replaced the pump to be safe, and updated to clear tubing and the new, non-corrosive coolant.

      Heck, add some LEDs and it would be pretty nice !
      Jkirk3279
  • Still laughing

    Macs and DIY types.

    Unless this comes installed, it's of no interest to the Mac fraternity who wouldn't look under the hood if you paid 'em ;-)
    tonymcs@...
    • RE: Asetek liquid cools, overclocks 2.8GHz Apple Mac Pro because it can

      @tonymcs@... Actually, I would suggest that the "need" to look under the hood is irrelevant to the Mac fraternity. After all, to use an analogy, a person who buys an expensive, high performance automobile may look under the hood "once" or "twice" for curiosity's sake but if the power train components "just work" as expected, the "need" to look further becomes irrelevant in relation to the driver's pleasure.

      Usually the need to tinker under the hood stems from a necessity to improve upon a common or utilitarian piece of hardware and upgrade it to a state well past its original design features .. usually at a cost in time and expense beyond a reasonable return of investment.

      This is not the same as building something "from scratch" where the idea is to produce a piece of hardware built to high technical specifications at a substantially reduced cost. Still, once that particular hardware project is completed, the need to "tinker under the hood" becomes unnecessary as well .. until the next "do-it-yourself" hardware project comes along.

      Of course, the above observations are generalizations and exceptions can always be found. But these generalizations are the norm rather than the exception.
      kenosha77a
      • RE: Asetek liquid cools, overclocks 2.8GHz Apple Mac Pro because it can

        @kenosha7777 This post sounds utterly rediculous. Did you re-read this before posting?
        mlbslugger
      • RE: Asetek liquid cools, overclocks 2.8GHz Apple Mac Pro because it can

        @mlbslugger
        The word is spelled "ridiculous". Did you reread YOUR post before posting?
        DeusXMachina
    • RE: Asetek liquid cools, overclocks 2.8GHz Apple Mac Pro because it can

      @tonymcs@...

      Based on what evidence to you make this RIDICULOUS assertion?!? Certainly not any actual facts or data.
      DeusXMachina
  • RE: Asetek liquid cools, overclocks 2.8GHz Apple Mac Pro because it can

    Thanks for the interesting article, I haven't heard anything about liquid cooling in a long time.
    Loverock Davidson
    • RE: Asetek liquid cools, overclocks 2.8GHz Apple Mac Pro because it can

      @Loverock Davidson

      Personally I'd rather build an external air cooler with some Peltier Junction chillers in it than mess with pumping liquids.

      You stack a couple of those 12v Peltier Junction chips and you can make your own dry ice.

      A pyramid of 1 over 4 over 16 is supposed to be able to liquify oxygen from the air, but I never tried it.
      Jkirk3279
  • RE: Asetek liquid cools, overclocks 2.8GHz Apple Mac Pro because it can

    @kenosha7777

    Granted, but the opinion presented also demonstrates the thought differences between Mac and PC enthusiasts. The PC is a predominantly more hardware driven, mac is seeming to being more app driven, especially with prevalent schools of thought .I feel that the "Cult of Mac" is a bit heavier on the consumerism side. Having to repair Macs in the past, replacement parts are cost prohibitive and it is often cheaper to purchase a new Mac than upgrade the old. Part of Apple's mindset of both the company and the users is rampant trendy consumerism. "Oh new model just announced, dump old get new." The idea of just upgrading a part is almost non-existent. The majority of Mac owners expect it to just work, and when it is of no more power, or doesn't "just work" well enough anymore, out with old in with new.

    PC on the other hand sways more toward the hot rod enthusiast trying to, yes a "necessity to improve upon a common or utilitarian piece of hardware and upgrade it to a state well past its original design features." Hence why users can milk an old PC for years and yet keep it competitive until a new hardware redesign comes along. "A cost in time and expense beyond a reasonable return of investment," is debatable. Dropping in a late gen process to an early gen motherboard for cheap has served many people on the PC end well.
    dagratebez@...
    • RE: Asetek liquid cools, overclocks 2.8GHz Apple Mac Pro because it can

      @dagratebez@... Nicely done..
      ItsTheBottomLine
    • Eh.

      @dagratebez@...

      "The idea of just upgrading a part is almost non-existent."

      And again, I say "Eh".

      I've replaced hard drives, optical drives, keyboards, battery charging boards, modems, etc, all on Mac laptops.

      I wish I could update the Intel chip that governs how much RAM can be addressed, but I doubt even Apple's Labs would want to risk that.
      Jkirk3279
    • RE: Asetek liquid cools, overclocks 2.8GHz Apple Mac Pro because it can

      @dagratebez@<br>Do you even care if you know what you are talking about?<br>"Having to repair Macs in the past, replacement parts are cost prohibitive and it is often cheaper to purchase a new Mac than upgrade the old."<br><br>BULL, macs are little different that PCs in terms of standardized components. Are you claiming they use some proprietary drive bus? Weird voltages on their cooling fans? Power supplies that provide 1500 Volts? Please name a component inside a mac that I can not replace for cheaper than buying a new machine.<br><br>"Part of Apple's mindset of both the company and the users is rampant trendy consumerism. "Oh new model just announced, dump old get new.""<br><br>Again, BULL. The mac is actually well known for holding resale value better than most systems, precisely because people do NOT get rid of them for newer models, but hold on to them forever. You are 180 degrees wrong.<br><br>"Hence why users can milk an old PC for years and yet keep it competitive until a new hardware redesign comes along. "<br><br>Bull. The majority of PC owners throw out their systems in the garbage. That is how I get all my Windows boxes.<br><br>And please explain why I can not slot in a newer processor onto my mac logic board.<br><br>Seriously, if you don't have a clue what you are talking about, keep your uninformed opinions to yourself.<br><br>@ thebottomline<br>As you are renowned in the forums for having no idea what you are talking about, it is not a surprise to see you chime in.
      DeusXMachina
      • RE: Asetek liquid cools, overclocks 2.8GHz Apple Mac Pro because it can

        @DeusXMachina

        And please explain why I can not slot in a newer processor onto my mac logic board.

        -remember that 99% of all apple laptops have logic boards that do not have slotted cpu's or gpu's whereas many/most PC laptops have one or both..

        don't get me wrong I'm a huge apple fan, but their use of the fully integrated logic boards is a bit of a pain. Realistically if your logic board/cpu/gpu goes, on most models, it's not really a cost-effective repair..
        brad.neufeld@...