Intel ramping up production of new Sandy Bridge CPUs

Intel ramping up production of new Sandy Bridge CPUs

Summary: Still haven't upgraded your Core Duo or even your Pentium 4 system yet? If you want to jump straight to Intel's latest and greatest for your next PC, you may want to skip the current generation of "Nehalem" Core processors, because the chip giant says it's ramping up the schedule to get its new Sandy Bridge platform to market by the end of the year.

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Still haven't upgraded your Core Duo or even your Pentium 4 system yet? If you want to jump straight to Intel's latest and greatest for your next PC, you may want to skip the current generation of "Nehalem" Core processors, because the chip giant says it's ramping up the schedule to get its new Sandy Bridge platform to market by the end of the year.

Sandy Bridge CPUs are slated for a late 2010 release, but CEO Paul Otellini said on Intel's quarterly earnings call this week that customer interest from system manufacturers was so high that the company has to pour additional resources into meeting that demand. Given that Intel's mobile device strategy beyond laptops is far from a slam dunk, it's not entirely surprising that Otellini enthused, "I am more excited about Sandy Bridge than I have been about any product that the company has launched in a number of years."

Why the hype? Sandy Bridge will shrink the memory controller and the integrated GPU down to 32nm, the size at which the latest CPUs are manufactured. The result should be not only improved performance, but less power usage and a lower thermal output. According to leaked information, Sandy Bridge processors should all offer clock speeds of at least 3.1GHz, whether they fall under Intel's continuing Core i3, i5, or i7 series. While the new Core i7 and i3 parts will support Hyper-Threading, the new i5s will not. The Core i7 2600 quad-core will also sport 8MB of L3 cache, though that will be shared between the CPU and GPU.

Will all of this result in plenty of Sandy Bridge-based desktops and laptops reaching consumers by the holiday season? That would be a fine gift for Intel fanboys -- and a lump of coal in AMD's stocking.

Topics: Intel, Hardware, Processors

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22 comments
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  • I just want to see

    new iMacs.
    Credit card is ready.
    davebarnes
    • RE: Intel rushing new Sandy Bridge CPUs to market in 2010

      @davebarnes
      "Credit card ready" Is that because the amount of cash needed to buy one would never fit into normal sized pockets?
      Apple use generation old Intel processors and are underpowered with no option to increase system speed without blowing a third world countries budget, Why bother? If you want the latest, go to another manufacturer.
      I Hate Malware
  • RE: Intel rushing new Sandy Bridge CPUs to market in 2010

    My main desktop is a single core 2GHz machine and my main laptop is a 1GHz machine. I haven't seen any reason to upgrade in the past five years.

    Instead of simply saying he is excited, this person should be explaining why he is excited... How will it help me in my business? Why should I buy a new PC when there are hundreds and thousands of great, speedy PCs that people simply give away? I should mention that I run Mandriva Linux as my OS on all of my PCs.
    jrockefeller1@...
    • RE: Intel rushing new Sandy Bridge CPUs to market in 2010

      @jrockefeller1@...

      "I should mention that I run Mandriva Linux as my OS on all of my PCs."

      Nah, I really don't care.
      CobraA1
    • RE: Intel rushing new Sandy Bridge CPUs to market in 2010

      ... nor do I.
      mcgonegal
    • I'm with Jrock...show me the reason to upgrade

      My Pentium4 2 ghz running Win2K performs well....WHY do I need to upgrade? Is there some new app that I can't live without?
      From my experience, most "upgraders" want a faster computer...but aren't smart enough to clear their cache and remove a dozen toolbars from their browser.
      Bill_SixPack
      • RE: Intel rushing new Sandy Bridge CPUs to market in 2010

        @Bill_SixPack - YO! 6pack...check with MS soon there good buddy, WIN2k support is disappearing quickly. You may find you aren't as set as you may think you are!
        franklymydear
      • RE: Intel rushing new Sandy Bridge CPUs to market in 2010

        Think Maya renderings and video editing. Single cores are way too slow for these desktop uses. I'm waiting for the price cut on the i7-950.
        mryanaz
    • RE: Intel rushing new Sandy Bridge CPUs to market in 2010

      @jrockefeller1@... You shouldn't since you don't do anything with your PC that requires it. I will probably upgrade because Catia is a resource hog and benefits from a speedy processor with a fast memory controller regardless of OS. Later on down the road you might find that there will be software you need, even Linux software, that will require a faster processor but, until then stick with what you have.

      @Bill_SixPack... As for you I suppose if all you ever do is putter about online or use old software then your machine is fine but, you won't have the memory capacity or 64 bit capability of a machine like mine, which is not top of the line more like a generation behind. Upgrading is far more important if you're a Window's user in my opinion. Windows software has the annoying habit of ceasing to be supported once the next iteration of Windows comes out. You're what? 2 almost 3 Window's OS's behind? Most software I see manufactured today has at least an XP requirement. I suppose then if you like your slow machine, and yes compared to a multi-core properly configured system yours is slow, like using old software, and don't do much with it you can get away with not upgrading but, to me that would be like driving a car for 300,000 miles and saying "fuck the tune up it runs."
      Str0b0
    • RE: Intel rushing new Sandy Bridge CPUs to market in 2010

      @jrockefeller1@...
      Nobody cares what OS you run, that's irrelevant to the story.
      Apart from that, I agree with the rest of your post.
      I Hate Malware
  • RE: Intel rushing new Sandy Bridge CPUs to market in 2010

    "and the integrated GPU"

    Umm . . . what?

    They're integrating a GPU in now?

    No thanks, discrete's still a lot better.

    Not to mention CPUs are rarely the bottleneck anymore. Even games aren't pushing CPUs to the limit anymore, with GPUs being able to take care of pretty much everything, now that they're general purpose and not as specialized as they used to be.
    CobraA1
    • RE: Intel rushing new Sandy Bridge CPUs to market in 2010

      @CobraA1 - Gotta agree there. I don't want a GPU on the core if I can get one without it. Maybe it's more efficient, maybe it's a littel faster but I would rather have a dedicated GPU OFF the core. At least I can upgrade that easily enough!
      franklymydear
    • RE: Intel rushing new Sandy Bridge CPUs to market in 2010

      @CobraA1
      Newer systems with on die graphics are being introduced that have the capacity to switch between discrete and on die when necessary, without user interference. This results in a more energy efficient system while retaining the necessary grunt for intensive graphics. I 'd rather have one of those than a power hungry standalone discrete solution.
      I Hate Malware
  • RE: Intel rushing new Sandy Bridge CPUs to market in 2010

    Trouble with any new system, it will be higher priced until the processor work has been paid for. No upgrading yet. Yet all things are relative as upgrades are happening all of the time. Software--I have a program that barely runs under XP as it was designed for an earlier version (it was a free demo, now is not really available, the comapny was bought by Corel). Haven't tried the competition's free program yet.
    dhays
  • RE: Intel rushing new Sandy Bridge CPUs to market in 2010

    Windows, or linux? the only reason to upgrade is when your software doesn't work any more. on the other hand when u upgrade your favorite software won't run either. so unless you are the guy who has to have the fastest computer on the block, better to wait till they get some of the bugs/costs ironed out.
    glockmi
  • RE: Intel rushing new Sandy Bridge CPUs to market in 2010

    Yet another article that tells us nothing - 'upgraded your Core Duo or even your Pentium 4'. Same pinout, same form factor, take the same memory? Can I just remove my old processor and put in the new? Please give us the technical specs - and be accurate!
    geoffrey.seymour
    • RE: Intel rushing new Sandy Bridge CPUs to market in 2010

      @geoffrey.seymour

      You're asking an honest question, highly unlikely you will get an honest answer. Many more of us would like to see that answer.
      hantoyo1@...
    • RE: Intel rushing new Sandy Bridge CPUs to market in 2010

      @geoffrey.seymour no, a new generation of chips will not go back to the pinout and form factor of the core duo or pentium 4. Even the i3,i5,i7,i9 are not compatible with those older chips. These new chips may be compatible with the LGA 1156 or LGA 1366 of the core i series, or maybe not.
      kevinrs1
    • RE: Intel rushing new Sandy Bridge CPUs to market in 2010

      @geoffrey.seymour <br>The new sandy's will *likely* be in a Socket LGA 1366 depending on what you currently own they may or may not be compatible. If you own one of the older systems you likely have a LGA775 socket. This means it likely uses DDR or DDR2 memory not the current DDR3. You also likely have an IDE aka PATA hard drive which although compatible will slow the system down significantly. In addition, your Video card is at best a AGP, also not compatible with newer systems.

      For those that are fighting upgrading don't do it, it isnt for everyone but dont come here and tell people your single P4 is anything near the processing power of a Sandy Bridge or Gulftown processor's 6 core (effective 12) processors that can handle much more data per cycle is nothing short of amazing in comparison.
      nblackmarr@...
  • RE: Intel rushing new Sandy Bridge CPUs to market in 2010

    Oh, and by the way everyone, make sure whatever upgrade path you choose doesn't involve an OEM that chooses nice, expensive chipsets such as the Intels and then purposely throttles them down with their Bios settings that they WILL NOT or CHOOSE NOT to un-throttle. So in many cases, any laptop by almost any OEM is nothing but a target for the OEMs to modify to their Bios settings without concern for the end-user/customer. That to me is a pity and a crime against both the customer and the chipset manufacturer.
    hantoyo1@...