New Pentax K-x dSLR dishes up HD video for under $650

New Pentax K-x dSLR dishes up HD video for under $650

Summary: Taking a page from its successful predecessor, the K200D, the newly announced Pentax K-x delivers impressive specs in an aggressive priced package. Currently the lowest-priced dSLR to provide HD video, the K-x is priced at least $200 less than the next cheapest dSLRs with HD video, the Nikon D5000 and the Canon Rebel T1i.

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Taking a page from its successful predecessor, the K200D, the newly announced Pentax K-x delivers impressive specs in an aggressively priced package. Currently the lowest-priced dSLR to provide HD video, the K-x is priced at least $200 less than the next cheapest dSLRs with HD video, the Nikon D5000 and the Canon Rebel T1i.  Like the K200D, it takes easy-to-find AA batteries (four AA lithium batteries are included) rather than proprietary Lithium Ion batteries like most dSLRs, and its compact size will appeal to shooters making the jump up from point-and-shoot models.  The new K-x will be available in four colors when it starts shipping in October (black, white, red, and navy blue) though the red and blue versions will be limited editions.

For a quick specs comparison with similarly priced competitors:

Pentax K-x Sony Alpha DSLR-A330 Olympus E-620
Price $649.95 (with 18-55mm lens), ships in October $649.99 (with 18-55mm lens)

$699.99 (with 14-42mm lens)

Sensor 12.4 megapixels, 23.6×15.8mm CMOS 10.2 megapixels,  23.5 x 15.7mm CCD 12.3 megapixel Live MOS
Continuous Shooting Speed 4.7 fps 2.5 fps 4.0 fps
LCD 2.7-inch, 230,000 pixels (fixed) 2.7-inch, 230,400 pixels (tiltable) 2.7-inch, 230,000 pixels (articulated)
Autofocus 11-point (9 cross-type) 9-point 7-point (5 cross-type)
Sensitivity ISO 100-12800 ISO 100-3200 ISO 100-3200
Live View Yes Yes Yes
Storage Media SD, SDHC Memory Stick PRO Duo, Memory Stick PRO-HG Duo, SD memory card, SDHC memory card Compact Flash Type I/II (UDMA), Microdrive, xD-Picture Card
Movie Mode

1280×720 (24 fps)/640×416 (24 fps) None None
Dimensions 4.8×3.6×2.7 inches 5.0×3.8×2.8 inches 5.11×3.7×2.36 inches
Weight (body)

18.2 oz 17.3 oz 16.6 oz

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9 comments
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  • share lenses?

    anyone know if this can share lenses with an ist-
    D?
    lostarchitect
    • Yes, it will.

      All the Pentax DSLRs will use any lens that Pentax has ever made, going back to the screw-mount lenses of the Spotmatic series. You need an adapter for those, but all Pentax lenses will work.
      pjdemmitt1
      • great, thanks! (n/m)

        .
        lostarchitect
  • RE: New Pentax K-x dSLR dishes up HD video for under $650

    I buy when they come out with a full frame sensor. I have a lot of very good glass from my K1000.
    gertruded
  • RE: New Pentax K-x dSLR dishes up HD video for under $650

    It seems like the only award winning photos I see are made with full -frame cameras. Am I missing something ?
    govmtman
  • RE: New Pentax K-x dSLR dishes up HD video for under $650

    Great, just great. This is fantastic innovation on the part of Pentax. This will put pressure on the other camera makers to come up with something competitive.

    The K-x is very tempting as a second camera and fantastic for those venturing into the world of DSLRs for the first time.
    orionds
  • Cheap? Or expensive long-term?

    WHY, oh why, do these camera companies keep bringing out
    cameras that use regular batteries. The are for suckers only,
    and it sounds as though a decent beginners SLR has been
    ruined with the lack of a decent rechargeable, long life
    battery.
    mattmuir
    • well...

      I suppose you could buy rechargeables and a
      charging unit, and only use regular AAs when you
      can't plug it in.
      lostarchitect
      • camera battery facts

        The fact that you can use "regular" batteries does not mean that the manufacturer intends you to do so! This is a convenience so that if you forget an extra set and are running out of juice you can-not should-go to any store and pop in a set of AA batteries! The advantage of "proprietary" batteries is that they are usually lighter but also much more expensive to replace and harder to find. The AA rechargeables are cheap and plentiful and when they die you buy another set and can still use the same charger. Also, if you happen to upgrade to a new camera that takes AA's then you can keep your old batteries! With the proprietary batteries if you but a new camera chances are the battery will be different! (I think every camera that Kodak or Sony has ever made takes a different battery if not the AAs)
        drjoed