Facebook campaign 'Strip for Likes' breaks the rules

Facebook campaign 'Strip for Likes' breaks the rules

Summary: A Facebook campaign that has a model strip for Likes is probably not a good idea for a clothing brand that also caters to women. On top of that, it's also against rules for Facebook Pages.

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Advertising agency Arnold Amsterdam today launched a Facebook marketing campaign for clothing brand Stüssy that is very controversial, to say the least. In fact, it's actually not allowed, according to Facebook's own rules. You can see the Facebook app which is featured in the above video here: Strip for Likes.

The firm found a model on Facebook, dressed her up in every piece of men's clothing from Stüssy's Spring/Summer 2012 line, and then had her strip off all the clothes as the Facebook Page gets more Likes. Facebook users can also invite their friends to the Page so they can Like the campaign as well.

Here's how Arnold Amsterdam describes the campaign:

We always complain about brands that are begging for Likes. But "Strip for Likes" for Stüssy's Facebook fanpage at least uses the mechanism in an original way. The more likes, the more clothes come off. What's smart about it is that once you've liked the stripper, you'll be inclined to come back and see what her status is. On top of that you'll see a whole bunch of Stüssy clothes; she thus actually becomes a catwalk stripper. Nice, simple, and effective.

I'm not quite sure why Stüssy wants to associate its brand with a stripper. What is clearly directed at Stüssy's male audience could easily alienate its female consumer base. Furthermore, Stüssy probably isn't aware the campaign isn't allowed on Facebook.

Under the Facebook Pages Terms, there's a section called Promotions, which features these two points (the second one is almost exactly what is happening here):

  • You must not use Facebook features or functionality as a promotion's registration or entry mechanism. For example, the act of liking a Page or checking in to a Place cannot automatically register or enter a promotion participant.
  • You must not use Facebook features or functionality, such as the Like button, as a voting mechanism for a promotion.

"As you can imagine the model must be suffocating under that many layers of clothing," Colin Lamberton, Creative Arnold Amsterdam, said in a statement. "It is almost a public duty to free her out of this misery so we are expecting Facebook fans to help out here. Like and undress."

"As a contemporary brand you need to be wherever your fans live, shop or play," Sean Thompson, Head of Creativity of Arnold Amsterdam, said in a statement. "Facebook plays an integral part of their lives, Stussy AMS' Facebook is therefore an important platform to engage with fans inform them or just share the fun."

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Topic: Social Enterprise

Emil Protalinski

About Emil Protalinski

Emil is a freelance journalist writing for CNET and ZDNet. Over the years,
he has covered the tech industry for multiple publications, including Ars
Technica, Neowin, and TechSpot.

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5 comments
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  • Are you sure she's even really stripping?

    Are you sure she's even really stripping? Let alone based on the amount of likes.

    If you reload the page, the last image appears to be picked at random. She could have less or more clothes on.

    It looks more like a clever way to get people to like the page. Most people won't bother checking again to see if she is wearing less clothes next time.
    bradavon
  • It is the Marketing Departments Fault!

    You are right - they are violating FB terms!

    https://www.facebook.com/promotions_guidelines.php
    4- You must not condition registration or entry upon the user taking any action using any Facebook features or functionality other than liking a Page, checking in to a Place, or connecting to your app. For example, you must not condition registration or entry upon the user liking a Wall post, or commenting or uploading a photo on a Wall.

    But you can ask nonfans to like the contest tab (which likes the page) in order to enter that particular contest in order to "get more likes" and that would make it a Facebook fan-only contest...

    I've always wondered why brands do not keep tighter reigns on their marketing departments - since this is where the majority of violations originate from.
    teksquisite
    • Really?

      While I won't touch why Stussy wants to associate its brand with a stripper, I do question the assertion that this campaign is technically "not allowed."

      Now, I am no lawyer, but I'm pretty sure there is no violation here...

      + "You must not use Facebook features or functionality as a promotions registration or entry mechanism. For example, the act of liking a Page or checking in to a Place cannot automatically register or enter a promotion participant."
      --> No one is registered or entered in anything. There is no giveaway or prize. So, "liking" the page to see more constitutes neither registration nor entry into a promotion.

      + "You must not use Facebook features or functionality, such as the Like button, as a voting mechanism for a promotion."
      --> There is no voting. Nothing is being compared to or competing against anything else that would require a "vote" to determine a "winner". Indeed, there is nothing to win... (ref. Facebook's mini definition of promotion: "such as a contest or sweepstakes").
      mwavera
  • This was a breaking story...in 1981

    Look up David Ogilvy's outdoor work in the Paris Metro: better production and probably better results for the client.
    Warren Fick
  • Source

    Emil,
    The quote in your piece is not from Arnold Amsterdam, but from this blogpost: http://www.amsterdamadblog.com/2012/04/11/stussy-strips-for-likes/
    I think that's good to know.
    Cheers,
    Wouter
    wboon