Kingston rolls out HyperX memory kit; hails it as 'world's fastest memory'

Kingston rolls out HyperX memory kit; hails it as 'world's fastest memory'

Summary: Kingston Technology has unveiled the HyperX dual-channel DDR3 memory kit, which they are dubbing as the "fastest Intel-certified memory in the world."Clocked in at a speed of 2.

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TOPICS: Hardware
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Kingston Technology has unveiled the HyperX dual-channel DDR3 memory kit, which they are dubbing as the "fastest Intel-certified memory in the world."

Clocked in at a speed of 2.4GHz, this RAM kit is certainly no joke. The HyperX runs at 1.65 volts and with 9-11-9-27-2 timings, and it has been stamped with Intel's XMP certification for Core i7.

Pricing hasn't been announced yet, but it should be out and about by the end of the second quarter this year. Whatever it costs, the kit comes with a lifetime warranty and free 24/7 technical support.

Topic: Hardware

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  • Lifetime warranty isn't new with Kingston or other name brand retail kits

    DRAM shouldn't really fail within its life expectancy anyway. If it does, it's going to be because of an original manufacturers defect, and not likely from wear and tear. Flash RAM is the exact opposite though and I really think that's a shame. They need to make flash storage more reliable. As it stands, with flash RAM having a baked-in limited lifecycle, an SSD is not really any more reliable than a hard drive with a spinning motor (actually 2, if you count the motor for the arm). The difference is mostly in performance, but the value proposition is pretty weak when you factor in the price. Now if there were a way to use massive amounts of cache with a hard drive, and use DRAM instead of flash RAM (which they already do now), hard drives could easily get up to speed. It doesn't need to be a huge amount of DRAM either. I would say that 1GB of DRAM with predictive drive search algorithms would push hard drive speeds well into the performance realm of SSD's, but with a more manageable cost. TurboMemory didn't work because of the relatively low speed of flash RAM. I think that was a mistake using flash RAM.

    Here's what I'd like to see for desktop drives:

    a) A 2.5" form factor drive platter size with a 7200RPM rotational speed (probably required for space of battery component, unless a hardware manufacturer can squeeze a small battery in)
    b) at least 1GB of fast DRAM (DDR2/3/XDR, etc.)
    c) battery backup to flush the DRAM buffer on power loss
    d) SATA 6Gbps interface
    Joe_Raby
  • i still refuse to pay the money for i7. My quad core is fast enough.

    I have a quad core with 8gigs of memory that boots win 7 64 bit in 15 seconds. I can also run several virtual machines on it.

    I paid way less than an i7 for the whole rig.

    Maybe if they lowed the price, i would consider upgrading. Till then, forget it.

    That ram is impressive though.
    Been_Done_Before
  • I'm still of the opinion that more is better than faster.

    I'm still of the opinion that more memory is better than
    faster memory. Especially with multimedia and games, you
    need to store lots of bits and keep them off the slow
    hard drive. Generally speaking, the speed of the memory
    is rarely a bottleneck on a system.
    CobraA1
    • I agree

      More Ram is much better than faster ram, even in gaming machines you will not see any speed increase in your software by going to a little bit faster ram! But you will see a speed increase when you put more ram in.
      Eight Gig of ram will do a whole lot more for your machine .
      Daedalu
  • RE: Kingston rolls out HyperX memory kit; hails it as 'world's fastest memory'

    9-11-9-27-2 <-- that is some freaky timing..
    WareWolf801