Letting 'them' eat cake

Letting 'them' eat cake

Summary: Thank God for Steve Jobs or the Cartel would be so totally unafraid of the midgets in the Valley (+ Redmond) about the future of music. In this afternoon's panel, the Napster rep told us that ownership will go away.

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TOPICS: Apple
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Thank God for Steve Jobs or the Cartel would be so totally unafraid of the midgets in the Valley (+ Redmond) about the future of music. In this afternoon's panel, the Napster rep told us that ownership will go away. In the next breath she talked about letting users snip an HTML clip of a song. The whole panel, led by D's Kara Swisher, beat up on Apple for not showing up. Me, I thought it totaly appropriate given the chimp mentality at work among the rent-a-track hypesters.

Why don't they get that the iPod broke the back of the record monopoly, just like the VCR broke the back of the projectionist's union. Michael Robertson: Jobs has to open up the APIs. Not really. Then the Apple trivialization. It's about design, it's the hardware, it's oh so clueless. It's about the model, folks. Jobs has combined all those tools with a landgrab barrier to entry to move the market inexorably toward the timeout on music catalogue back rights.

On the way down on SouthWest I watched shows on my Video iPod--Rocketboom. No DRM, switched over to Hendrix ripped from the CD. I only had 30 minutes between device clearance and device shutdown. iTunes and AirTunes are my system at home. Save losslessly. Renterz: good night and good luck.

Oh and Pandora still bites, whether it's MusicIP or whatever. Lessee, what sounds like the Beatles. Bbbzzzzzt. Game over.

 

Topic: Apple

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  • rowing through consciousness

    Steve, this was a bit light on chewable fiber, but interesting nonetheless. If you are saying the music industry had it coming, I'd go along with that, but I'd appreciate a little more insight as to how you got there.

    Here's my take; the music industry built itself on being the only distribution channel for culturally connected audio. The crummy part of it was the stranglehold A&R had over the product. Product management in the record industry has always been something of an oxymorn, but the factory workers (musicians) have been more tempermental than dependable over the years. The relationship between artists and record companies is a sick co-dependent one with all the trimmings. All in all the whole things was a house of cards, but now that the distribution model has been wrenched away from them, the industry is left to fade to black (or is it red?)

    If IT doesn't matter and tech is drifting towards its own cesspool of commodization, then there must be another industry for technology to co-opt - like entertainment. If ever there was a target ripe for adult supervision... AND no whining from the business challenged either. Ignorance of good business practices is not a defense.

    So, Apple got there first and is doing its best to establish control. Yep, looks to me like they have it pretty well ensnared, at least if I ask my kids - and the last time I checked they were spending more on audio than I was.

    Next year, they should move the OnHollywood event to Cupertino. Rock on Apple! - despite what David Berlind says about DRM.
    seen it