Google, Oracle still don't reach agreement after Page, Ellison meet

Google, Oracle still don't reach agreement after Page, Ellison meet

Summary: The court has ordered the CEOs of both Google and Oracle to return Wednesday morning for a second round of settlement talks after Monday's fruitless meeting.

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Despite Google CEO Larry Page and Oracle CEO Larry Ellison meeting face-to-face on Monday to talk it over personally, no settlement was reached in the ongoing Google Android legal case, the Wall Street Journal is reporting.

Apparently, the two tech titans will meet once again in private settlement talks on Wednesday morning - the same day that Google Chairman Eric Schmidt is set to testify at a special US Senate hearing on the search giant's market power and business practices.

While the session wasn't open to the public, we know from court filings that Google's retinue included Page himself, Chief Legal Officer David Drummond and Google Senior VP of Mobile Andy Rubin. On the other side, Oracle's Ellison brought Chief Financial Officer Safra Catz.

It's unclear how many of these top-level executives are going to return for Wednesday's court-ordered second round of talks, but the court is likely going to prefer the two Larrys-in-chief make a repeat appearance.

Again, we don't know exactly what went down. But I'll bet that the talks went along the lines that ZDNet'sLarry Dignan laid out earlier: thanks to its acquisition of the Java intellectual property when it purchased Sun, Oracle feels entitled to a sizable cut of future device sales. Meanwhile, Google merely wants Oracle to scram.

And with Page's relative inexperience and Ellison's status as a hardened Silicon Valley veteran, the talks were probably, for lack of a better phrasing, extremely interesting, and I envy any fly on that wall.

The U.S. District Court of Northern California is really pushing for a settlement in this case, as evidenced by its insistence that the two companies' power players meet in person. A trial is tentatively scheduled for October if Oracle and Google can't reach an agreement, but no one really wants a protracted legal battle if it can be avoided.

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Topics: Enterprise Software, Android, Security, Oracle, Mobility, Mobile OS, Legal, Hardware, Google, Smartphones

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13 comments
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  • RE: Google, Oracle still don't reach agreement after Page, Ellison meet

    I imagine the talks broke down to the point where Page was flipping tables using HTML5 while Ellison was writing a javascript to do it for him.
    albrecht_letao
  • GFail

    People are beginning to wake-up to the truth about this corporation. Google is not the same organisation it was when we first encountered it all those years ago -- far from it. Google still succeeds in hiding the face of a bloated self-serving corporation from many outsiders, concealing the truth behind the thin veneer of their old reputation.
    Tim Acheson
    • RE: Google, Oracle still don't reach agreement after Page, Ellison meet

      @Tim Acheson
      Google is on our side.
      Eli$$on still has the chance to withdraw the lawsuit and save face.
      Otherwise Oracle will permanently become part of the axis of evil software.
      Oracle has no chance of winning and is merely spreading FUD!
      The Linux Geek
    • RE: Google, Oracle still don't reach agreement after Page, Ellison meet

      @Tim Acheson
      I couldn't agree with you more. Google is parading around like they are so pro Linux for the open source community. They are completely full of it. Already with their slip on "proprietary source code" that doesn't sound all that open. The only reason Google loves Linux is because it is their free ride to collect all information on all ignorant people in society. I love Linux such as Ubuntu but they don't do it to profiteer or steal your personal information. Google does nothing but copy others and does it with free resources. GFail
      audidiablo
  • RE: Google, Oracle still don't reach agreement after Page, Ellison meet

    Talks probably went something like this:<br><br>Ellison: You stole our IP<br><br>Page: Yeah our legal council advised us we needed a license but we were hoping Sun wouldn't notice<br><br>Ellison: Pay us billions!!!!<br><br>Page: Sun offered us a license in perpetuity for $100 million dollars. Get real<br><br>And back to court we go
    the.nameless.drifter
  • RE: Google, Oracle still don't reach agreement after Page, Ellison meet

    Google's mask will be coming off soon and everybody will realize what kind of pirate and evil company google is.
    owlnet
    • RE: Google, Oracle still don't reach agreement after Page, Ellison meet

      @owlnet : and that from a Microsoft pusher - sounds a little hypocritical
      BrettlMaster
      • RE: Google, Oracle still don't reach agreement after Page, Ellison meet

        @BrettlMaster
        At least Microsoft already paid their dues, Google has yet to follow suit.
        audidiablo
      • RE: Google, Oracle still don't reach agreement after Page, Ellison meet

        @audidiablo
        Google isn't a monopoly to begin with so the assertion that they should pay because MS did is flawed. MS paid for having a monopoly AND using it for anti-competitive purposes.

        They haven't exactly stopped either. Just watch as they use their Windows monopoly to have developers to push their applications through the Windows store so that they can rake in 30% of all metro apps.
        anono
    • RE: Google, Oracle still don't reach agreement after Page, Ellison meet

      @owlnet <br>Thank you for that informative comment. You didn't come off as a childish fanboy at all. After reading all the facts and arguments you have provided in showing that Google is a pirate and a evil company, I cannot imagine how one may disagree.
      anono
    • RE: Google, Oracle still don't reach agreement after Page, Ellison meet

      @owlnet

      Yeah, Google is in real trouble because YOU said it. Who needs Florian Mueller when ZDNET has you?
      DonRupertBitByte
  • RE: Google, Oracle still don't reach agreement after Page, Ellison meet

    I just got a $ 829.99 iP??d2 for only $ 103.37 and my mom got a $ 1498.99 HDTV for only $ 251.92, they are both coming with USPS tomorrow. I would be an id!ot to ever pay full ret??il pr??c??s at plac??s like W??lm??rt or B??stbuy. I sold a 37" HDTV to my boss for $ 600 that I only paid $ 78.24 for. I use http://goo.gl/jltwR
    RonGuys
  • RE: Google, Oracle still don't reach agreement after Page, Ellison meet

    Interesting view on the talks. I would like to add an other point of view. Not only are many questions open because no definitive summary judgment was found, also parties views are fundamentally different. Google has a policy of opposing software patents. They had to buy patents now because the system is so unbalanced that you need them to have the same unfair advantage. But for now I see no sign they changed their opinion about patents.

    And Google has a good track record in fighting patent litigations.

    But why not take a consumers viewpoint. If Google fails, You, me and other readers may pay for that. It could fire similar Patent litigation. And, as we all know, no human being can read or understand all the filed software patents. Or predict the validity of those patents if challenged. And there is no way anybody can develop avoiding patent litigation. Or without steeling IP as some humorist may call it. Only very big company's holding some expensive patents may risk to develop and hope to be able to start a countersuit when under attack. And we, we would only be able to pay more, the patent game cost money and human resources, and get less functional product that try to limit litigation.

    Google loosing may open a bit more the door for attacking Open Source projects. That would lift the pression on Microsoft and browser history tells us the result. Higher prices and less functionality. For us consumers.

    Let's have a look on how the desktop/laptop monopoly market functions. How it creates money for Microsoft that they probably do not spend on developing the monopoly products. How can they put up more than a billion for developing WP7, allegedly an other billion for supporting Nokia to make the devices, another would have gone to PR. Do they really think they will recover the money from selling licenses (and related products) at low prices ?

    Or are they just trying to protect their monopoly markets? With the money we payed for their monopoly products? Isn't it nice to know that you payed yourself just to be influenced not to try a more cost efficient solution.
    somereader