FCC defends work in getting nets back online, but will more spectrum be allocated to emergency?

FCC defends work in getting nets back online, but will more spectrum be allocated to emergency?

Summary: After La. Gov. Kathleen Babineaux Blanco blasted telecom providers for failing to deal with the destroyed wireless infrastructure in the wake of Katrina - "The communications network is completely gone," Blanco said Sept. 1 - the FCC yesterday claimed the agency was working efficiently with industry to restore service.

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After La. Gov. Kathleen Babineaux Blanco blasted telecom providers for failing to deal with the destroyed wireless infrastructure in the wake of Katrina -  "The communications network is completely gone," Blanco said Sept. 1 - the FCC yesterday claimed the agency was working efficiently with industry to restore service, according to EE Times.

In a joint statement, FCC commissioners said the agency "has been in continual contact with the industry and has taken prompt action, where necessary, to provide regulatory relief to facilitate restoration efforts." It cited efforts to deploy alternative communications networks in the Gulf region to speed the efforts.

"We have also assisted in performing coordination activities between the industry and federal emergency authorities as appropriate," the agency said. "We will continue doing everything within our power to ensure the vitality of the nation's communications network. We are confident that all service providers will do the same."

EE Times quoted an unnamed source accusing government at all levels of

"gross oversight" for relying on fixed communications networks to coordinate relief efforts. Portable RF systems with portable generators should have been used for emergency communications, the source said.

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Topics: Government US, Government, Networking, Wi-Fi

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  • Satellite phones for key organizations

    At least in hindsight it appears obvious that FEMA could have a stock of sat-phones that it pre-positions with local government and first responders in advance of a huricane making landfall. The phones could be re-positioned to other areas as events change.
    The sat-phones have the advantage that the user does not need training in radio net protocol and there is no line-of-sight or range restriction. Also I expect most local government people have a phone list they operate from in emergencies so forcing them onto radio would be disruptive.
    JRA_z