In court: iPhone suit dismissed, Qwest conviction reviewed

In court: iPhone suit dismissed, Qwest conviction reviewed

Summary: Lots of court action today:Apple won a summary judgment in a class-action lawsuit charging the company with deceiving consumers on iPhone batteries, Bloomberg reports.``Apple disclosed on the outside of the iPhone package that the'' battery has ```limited recharge cycles and may eventually need to be replaced by Apple service provider,''' Kennelly wrote in his Sept.

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TOPICS: Apple, iPhone, Mobility
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Lots of court action today:
  • Apple won a summary judgment in a class-action lawsuit charging the company with deceiving consumers on iPhone batteries, Bloomberg reports.
    ``Apple disclosed on the outside of the iPhone package that the'' battery has ```limited recharge cycles and may eventually need to be replaced by Apple service provider,''' Kennelly wrote in his Sept. 23 opinion, quoting the packaging. ``Under the circumstances, no reasonable jury could find that deception occurred.''
    AT&T was not excused from the lawsuit and the judge declined to order binding arbitration, as AT&T said was required by the service agreement.
    Kennelly said that at the time Trujillo bought an iPhone, he ``did not have access to a paper copy of any documents explaining or referencing'' the ``terms of service, including in particular the arbitration requirement.''
  • The 10th Circuit reviewed the exclusion of a financial expert in the conviction of former Qwest CEO Joseph Nacchio, InfoWeek noted. Oral arguments indicated the appeals court would uphold the conviction, watchers of this case said.
    "There's a strong possibility that the panel is going to reinstate the conviction, based on their questions," University of Denver law professor Jay Brown told the Denver Post.
  • Jack Thompson, a vocal critic of the gaming industry, was disbarred by the Supreme Court of Florida, DigitalTrends reports. The Court said:
    Thompson “demonstrated a pattern of conduct to strike out harshly, extensively, repeatedly and willfully to simply try to bring as much difficulty, distraction and anguish to those he considers in opposition to his causes,” which violated the guidelines of professional behavior laid out for attorneys.

    Thompson made false statements of material fact to courts, falsely, recklessly and publicly accused a judge of “fixing” cases, sent courts inappropriate and offensive sexual materials, and even harassed former clients of attorneys that opposed him.

Topics: Apple, iPhone, Mobility

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  • Don't buy anything with built in batteries

    I would never buy anything that required the manufacturer to replace the battery. I have three batteries for my trusty old Nokia 6310i which by itself has fantastic battery life. But then, I use it as a phone, not a fashion statement.
    jamestbaines
  • RE: In court: iPhone suit dismissed, Qwest conviction reviewed

    here's my thoughts on this battery issue, i feel they should be replaceable only for the need of carrying a spare, however if the batteries have good running times, then there may never be a need for a spare. So if that can be made the case. there is then no need to replace the batteries anyway since when the device would be useless there would then be the need to replace and upgrade the device any way. I have also seen devices to attach to the devices to extend batteries life so again no need to make it removable. But it must be a device, in this case the iphone. Its technically a computer. Its not going to be upgradeable in software forever in term would need to be replaced. I see why these companies are doing this.

    Example, Sansa mp3 player, has 20-40 hours playback, and i actually get that! With that charge time i have no need to carry a spare, but when the battery no longer keeps a charge, i would then most likely need to buy a new device that has more storage or has supported updates. Sansa will discontinue updates for the device. Also operating systems with updates could make the software to update and use the device obsolete, and the company has the right to discontinue making and updating that software and make new software for newer devices. This is the world we live in, so if you dont like it, stop buying so there companies start listening to what you want, you buy, then that gives them the idea that you like what they are doing and are fine with it. Also people just need to start excepting change and stop being so narrow minded. If the change is positive then go with it ans stop fighting.

    i do feel that the iphone should have a removable battery since its run time is not anywhere near enough to use a non-removable battery.
    applegod
    • Well, that's wrong.

      See, Apple - by not adding user-replaceable batteries - just gets a hidden market for every time a battery needs to be replaced.

      Or the user will do what might make Al Gore cry, throw the thing out, and bugger out to buy a new one.
      HypnoToad
      • I agree with you...

        I don't like this trend. I don't want to be locked into buying a new device just because the manufacturer thinks I should. It's also terrible for the environment. I have no doubt whatsoever that sending it back to the manufacturer for battery replacement will cost nearly as much as buying a new one.

        This is nothing more than corporate greed. And it's corporate greed that got this country into the financial mess it's in right now.
        mrsfixit
      • That's not the reason

        [i]by not adding user-replaceable batteries - just gets a hidden market for every time a battery needs to be replaced.[/i]

        Actually, it's because Apple wants to save the environment. Since Al Gore's on the Board, Apple relizes we can't be trusted to dispose of the batteries at a recycling center, so they're doing it for us. :)
        AllKnowingAllSeeing
        • Of course, silly me!

          Of course, that's one of the top priorities of huge, rich corporations- saving the environment! The battery issue is not motivated by profit- it's motivated by civic duty! Thank you for enlightening us! LOL ;-)

          Now, being the green person I am, who recycles everything including rechargeable batteries- I can be trusted to do my own recycling. So thanks- but no thanks- to those devices with non-replaceable batteries.
          mrsfixit