Does green tech mean wimpy tech? Dell thinks not

Does green tech mean wimpy tech? Dell thinks not

Summary: In certain green IT circles, there may be the perception that if you go "green" you're somehow skimping on features. I'm not sure where this idea came from, honestly.

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In certain green IT circles, there may be the perception that if you go "green" you're somehow skimping on features. I'm not sure where this idea came from, honestly.

Let's pause for a moment to try to figure it out. Could it come from the idea that you need to use a thin client, which means you can't run software natively on the device? Could it come from the notion that you need to stick with older servers and just try to use them more wisely? Who knows.

Anyway, the folks at Dell are refuting this urban myth today with a post on their corporate social responsibility blog about their Alienware M11x notebook.

I'm not personally a user of the Alienware line, but I know they are some of the baddest, fastest systems out there because of the graphics intensity of what they're running. But Dell disputes the idea that in order to have a 15-inch laptop that SCREAMS in graphics performance that you have to use more power. For starters, the system uses a low-voltage processor from Intel. It also lets you switch different energy modes and dim the LEDs if you want to "Go Dark."

Now, it may very well indeed be true that the greenest technology is the most expensive technology. Many of the power-optimized advances in the Intel architecture are, after all, coming on its most high-end systems. But, the fact is that power management is simply become tablestakes for every new system out on the market, if it expects to get anywhere.

Topics: Emerging Tech, CXO, Dell, Enterprise Software, IT Employment

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  • RE: Does green tech mean wimpy tech? Dell thinks not

    Great blog, if only more manufacturers would think of the efficiency/performance ratings, IC manufacturer would then be making IC with this as a major parameter.
    Agnostic_OS
  • Low Power plus Solar

    There are some really nice fairly portable solar solutions out there that are powerful enough to run an energy efficient lap top.
    This solution would not work for everyone but it is a shame that it isn't offered as an add on accessory direct from the manufacturer.

    I do know someone who installed 100 Watt lights and runs 2 office cell phones, a printer and a laptop on solar. When the sun is bright he puts the cells on the window to charge the replacement batteries. When the sun is not out he turns the 100 watt bulbs on and they charge the batteries. He uses a little more energy when it is dark outside but he saves energy when it is sunny or reasonably bright outside.

    He does have some regular wall outlets as back ups but so far he has been 6 months on solar cells.

    He basically is running a small office on solar. I thought it was kind of cool.
    mr1972
    • Alternatively...

      He could tie into a coal-fired utility grid and not worry about constantly charging batteries.
      hiraghm@...
  • RE: Does green tech mean wimpy tech? Dell thinks not

    ULV processors are slow. For the most part lower power products are last Gen tech or tech from a few Gen's back but with newer technologies to lower voltage. Just like Athlon Neo, which is basically the 2007 Turion architecture with a smaller process and better power management features. Low power HD's are basically the same thing. Its just power management features on older tech. Because the tech today cannot also be low power. You can't have both. Its either speed or power consumption. The newest chips comming out are already as power efficient as they can be when they are launched. So all companies can do is go back to older tech and then improve on them using a bit of new tech.
    I know I've said the same thing about 5 times now, but I just want to make sure I get the point across.
    Jimster480
  • RE: Does green tech mean wimpy tech? Dell thinks not

    It's good to hear that some power savings doesn't affect performance, but my experience buying a WD green hard drive is that it was wrting nearly a third slower than my previous black series drive. There isn't that much savings in energy to justify giving up that much performance. Simply turning off my computer that previously ran all night saves much more energy that any single supposedly "green" component saves.
    elurrule