Tsk, tsk: Greenpeace scolds HP, Lenovo and Dell on latest green electronics listing

Tsk, tsk: Greenpeace scolds HP, Lenovo and Dell on latest green electronics listing

Summary: Yes, Hewlett-Packard, Dell and Lenovo have been doing plenty in the area of power management. But all three just got dinged on the latest of Greenpeace's ongoing Guide to Greener Electronics.

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Yes, Hewlett-Packard, Dell and Lenovo have been doing plenty in the area of power management. But all three just got dinged on the latest of Greenpeace's ongoing Guide to Greener Electronics. The link that I've just given you provides very details specifics on why each company has received the company it receives. It's close to 40 pages long.

That's because Greenpeace claims none of them have been as active in the are of toxic chemical phaseout as the environmental giant would like them to see. Specificially, HP has postponed its pledge in 2007 to get rid of PVC plastic and brominated flame retardants by the end of this year.

Greenpeace ranks major gadget makers on a scale of 1 to 10, which 10 being the highest score you can earn. Nokia is the top company on the list, which at 7.5 out of 10. It gets props for its recycling initiatives in particular, although it has a very low recycling rate at just 3 percent of 5 percent of the products it produces. Samsung and Sony Ericsson are creeping up on Nokia, in the second-place and third-place positions.

Of the three PC makers in question, HP finds itself in 14th place, Dell scores better and Lenovo scores near the bottom of the heap. The highest ranking PC maker is Toshiba, which probably burns Apple, which likes to say that it makes the greenest computers on the planet.

Topics: Lenovo, Dell, Hewlett-Packard

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6 comments
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  • Greenpeace is irrelevant

    Does it really matter what they say or do?
    GuidingLight
  • Greenpeace are scum

    For example: "Nintendo works to eliminate harmful substances from its products right from the initial stages of material selection, but does not refer to the Precautionary Principle"
    earns Nintendo a score of Bad.

    Not bad because they use harmful substances, but bad because they don't use the terminology that Greenpeace demands.

    Punished for their words and not their actions, Nintendo is.

    I despise Greenpuke.
    davebarnes
    • I have to agree

      Greenpeace is one of those enviroloony
      organizations that I would LOVE to see shut
      down under eco-terrorism laws, because they
      have done many things that would be likened to
      eco-terrorism.

      And, with all due respect (not that they are
      due much) to Greenpeace..... some of those
      things will NOT be able to be gotten rid of.
      PVC plastic? Necessary for some items.
      Bromiated flame retardants? Same thing.

      Until Greenpeace gets real and realizes that
      some of these things, while 'polluting the
      planet' are necessary in REAL LIFE (which many
      of these eco-terror organizations do NOT live
      in)...... they will be and are irrelevant.
      Lerianis10
    • I found that disturbing as well.

      While I'm not as far right as most conservatives are on issues of the environment - I do have to agree that scoring businesses based on moral principles is dubious. Greenpeace is acting more like a religion rather than organization.
      CobraA1
  • Keep in mind politics vs science

    Keep in mind that not all of these organizations are scientifically oriented, and often do not have scientists in their highest positions.

    One person who left Greenpeace pointed it out:

    http://online.wsj.com/article/SB120882720657033391.html?mod=opinion_main_commentaries

    Frankly, I don't think fear should run our lives. If something has obvious negative effects, then go ahead and stop using it. But to be afraid of every chemical under the sun just because somebody finds miniscule amounts floating around is just plain silly.

    Anybody who has taken a college level chemistry class knows that occasionally molecules get bumped off the surface of pretty much any material and start floating around. But truth be told, for most solid materials it happens in extremely minute amounts. It's barely worth mentioning, and certainly nowhere near toxic levels.

    Science doesn't really support the idea that these materials are a danger to us. In many cases we've been using them for many years with no ill effects.
    CobraA1
  • RE: Tsk, tsk: Greenpeace scolds HP, Lenovo and Dell on latest green electronics listing

    After becoming a terrorist organization much like PITA.... You're right, they don't matter.
    flipicaneze