Dell's Ubuntu-powered line

Dell's Ubuntu-powered line

Summary: Dell's finally lifted the lid on the Ubuntu line. Here are the details ...

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TOPICS: Intel, Open Source
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Dell's finally lifted the lid on the Ubuntu line. Here are the details:

Dimention E520 N

Starter model:

  • Intel Core 2 Duo Processor E4300 (1.8GHz, 800 FSB)
  • Ubuntu Desktop Edition version 7.04
  • 1GB Dual Channel DDR2 SDRAM at 667MHz- 2DIMMs
  • 250GB Serial ATA Hard Drive (7200RPM) w/DataBurst Cache

Starting price - $599

Options (default indicates starter options):

  • CPU: - Intel Core 2 Duo E4300 (1.8GHz) - default - Intel Core 2 Duo E6320 (1.86GHz) - Intel Core 2 Duo E6420 (2.13GHz)
  • OS: - Ubuntu 7.04 no support - default - Ubuntu 7.04 30 days standard support - Ubuntu 7.04 1 year basic support - Ubuntu 7.04 one year standard support
  • Monitors: - 19 inch Samsung widescreen panel - 15 inch analog flat panel - 17 inch analog flat panel - default - 20 inch widescreen digital panel - 22 inch widescreen digital panel - 20 inch UltraSharp widescreen digital panel
  • RAM: - 1GB DDR2 - default - 2GB DDR2 - 4GB DDR2
  • Hard drive: - 250GB 7200RPM SATA - default - 320GB 7200RPM SATA
  • Optical drive: - 48x CD-RW/DVD combo - default - 16x DVD+/-RW - Dual 16x DVD ROM and 48 CD-RW/DVD combo - 16x DVD ROM and 16x DVD+/-RW
  • Video card: - Intel Graphics Media Accelerator 950 - default - 256MB nVIDIA GeForce 7300LE TurboCache
  • Sound card: - Integrated 7.1 channel audio - default

Inspiron E1505 N

Starter model:

  • Intel Pentium dual-core proc T2080(1MB Cache/1.73GHz/533MHz FSB
  • Ubuntu Edition version 7.04
  • 512MB Shared Dual Channel DDR2 SDRAM at 533MHz, 2 DIMM
  • 80GB 5400rpm SATA Hard Drive

Starting price - $599

Options (default indicates starter options):

  • CPU: - T7200 (2.0GHz) - T5600 (1.83GHz) - T5300 (1.73GHz) - T2350 (1.86GHz) - T2080 (1.73GHz) - default
  • OS: - Ubuntu 7.04 no support - default - Ubuntu 7.04 30 days standard support - Ubuntu 7.04 1 year basic support - Ubuntu 7.04 one year standard support
  • LCD Panel: - 15.4 inch XGA - 15.4 inch XGA with TrueLife - default - 15.4 inch UltraSharp widescreen WXGA+ with TrueLife - 15.4 inch UltraSharp widescreen SXGA+ with TrueLife
  • RAM: - 512MB DDR2 - default - 1GB DDR2 - 2GB DDR2 - 2GB DDR2 667MHz
  • Hard drive: - 100GB 7200RPM SATA - 160GB 5400RPM SATA - 80GB 7200RPM SATA - 120GB 5400RPM SATA - 80GB 5400RPM SATA - default
  • Optical drive: - 24x CD burner/DVD combo - default - 8x CD/DVD+/-RW double-layer write

XPS 410 N

Starter model:

  • Intel Core 2 Duo Processor E4300 (2MB L2 Cache,1.8GHz,800FSB)
  • Ubuntu Desktop Edition version 7.04
  • 1GB Dual Channel DDR2 SDRAM at 667MHz - 2 DIMMs
  • 250GB Serial ATA 3Gb/s Hard Drive (7200RPM) w/DataBurst Cache

Starting price - $849

Options (default indicates starter options):

  • CPU: - Intel Core 2 Duo E4300 (1.8GHz) - default - Intel Core 2 Duo E6320 (1.86GHz) - Intel Core 2 Duo E6420 (2.13GHz) - Intel Core 2 Duo E6600 (2.4GHz) - Intel Core 2 Duo E6700 (2.66GHz)
  • OS: - Ubuntu 7.04 no support - default - Ubuntu 7.04 30 days standard support - Ubuntu 7.04 1 year basic support - Ubuntu 7.04 one year standard support
  • RAM: - 1GB DDR2 - default - 2GB DDR2 - 4GB DDR2
  • Hard drive: - 250GB SATA - default - 320GB SATA - 500GB SATA
  • Optical drives: - Dual 16x DVD-ROM and 16x DVD+/-RW - 16x CD/DVD burner - default - Dual 48x combo and 16x CD/DVD burner
  • Monitors: - 19 inch UltraSharp digital panel - default - 19 inch Samsung flat panel - 20 inch widescreen digital panel - 22 inch widescreen digital panel - 20 inch UltraSharp widescreen digital panel - 24 inch UltraSharp widescreen digital panel
  • Video card: - 256MB nVIDIA GeForce 7300LE TurboCache - default
  • Sound card: - Integrated 7.1 channel audio - default

Topics: Intel, Open Source

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23 comments
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  • Mike Cox what now?

    We need your guidance!
    D T Schmitz
    • Mike is busy

      He's having all of the Dell servers run through the crusher at this very moment. As soon as that's safely done, he's going to go and order replacements from a company that doesn't ship anything but Microsoft kit. If he can find one.

      In the meantime, his legion of MCSEs will be doing all of the Company's computing by hand. There are Microsoft emergency response teams teaching them how to process TCP/IP by pencil, paper, and telegraph key at this very moment.
      Yagotta B. Kidding
      • Isn't Gateway pretty much an all MS shop?

        I certainly can't find Linux on a Gateway Machine.
        Michael Kelly
      • You're no Mike, But . . .

        Gotta give you an 9.2 for that one . . . .


        ROFLMAO

        Great job!!

        Btw, Goes Gateway do servers?
        JLHenry
    • Mike and his rep are in morning and will remain secluded untill after the

      GPL3 is released. This news from Dell, together with all the excitement around the GPL3, and the number of projects switching to GPL3, has them depressed. They are taking this very hard, and would appreciate a little privacy at this most difficult moment.
      DonnieBoy
    • Mike and his rep are in mourning and will remain secluded untill after the

      GPL3 is released. This news from Dell, together with all the excitement around the GPL3, and the number of projects switching to GPL3, has them depressed. They are taking this very hard, and would appreciate a little privacy at this most difficult moment.
      DonnieBoy
  • Good on Dell, but...

    I commend Dell for this bold step. Offering Linux on the desktop is a VERY brave move. I wish them well.

    Dell?s suggestion box was overwhelmed with requests for Linux (and other open source products). But, we need to look at the demographic that would have known about and replied to this forum. My guess is computer enthusiasts. Joe Average wouldn?t know what to suggest let alone where to do it.

    Linux is very capable in the server rooms of our corporations and enterprises, but is still not ready for the home user. Individuals want what they know and what they know (at least in an affluent society) is Windows.

    The only real progress in individual users adopting Linux will be in developing countries where they cannot afford to purchase commercial operating systems, let alone the powerful hardware required to run them. Linux and older (read, donated) hardware is ideal. These people gain access to technology and will grow up knowing nothing else but Linux. Obviously MS will attempt to enter these emerging markets, but licensing issues and anti-piracy measures will slow their progress.

    Only time will tell us if Dell has made an appropriate business decision. I do hope so, but I?m not particularly optimistic.
    Big Scoddie
    • Actually, not the only progress

      We've been using Linux for our point of sale systems for a while in a pretty standard thin client server set up with networked printers for a while now. Each store has it's own Linux server and recently we phased out the lone windows systems in our stores in favor of Open Office run through a thin client. It works pretty well even though we're using an older version of Open Office (1.2).

      Currently we build our systems from components and load them with Mandrake 9.2 and we're working on porting our Point of Sale system to a LAMP structure which would allow us a certain degree of flexibility in future operating system changes.
      maldain
    • Still not ready for the home user?

      When will it be ready for the home user? My mom's computer-illiterate. She makes her way around Ubuntu just fine though. She can type in Writer, fill out expense reports in Calc, and then send it as an attachment to the secretary at work. Windows was too hard for her to figure out. She could never find anything in the Start Menu, but finding things in the Gnome Menu is easy. Maybe WINDOWS isn't ready for the home user!

      Anyone, even if they're used to Windows, can get used to Linux within about an hour. You still move a mouse. You still click on things in menus. You still double-click on shortcuts. You still go through folders to find things. GNOME or KDE looks a bit different, so what? I think anyone can figure out that the only menu on the screen is the one they want, even if GNOME doesn't put it in the bottom left, and even if KDE makes it kinda shiny.
      macoafi
      • And I bet you are her full time support...

        Any new user needs help. The fact that your mother has not been pre-exposed to Windows is a bonus for her. Seems she is using her machine for business or some fairly basic tasks. Linux is more than capable in that role and I would NEVER argue that.

        However, ask your mother what she's going to do when she decides she wants to play a few games? Oh? She doesn't play games? Well, MOST home users want to use their machine for leisure. And games are a big factor. Linux just isn't supported well enough here (and don't start the WINE, VM, dual boot argument - I bet your mother would be a bit confused by all THAT without your considerable help).

        I love Linux. I would like to think more people decide to use it. But I do not have the time nor the patience to support those that do decide to adopt it. It's so much easier to send them to a department store to ask the pimply dorks how to get the photos off their camera - and the dork would actually be able to help.
        Big Scoddie
        • Not at all. She doesn't need any help.

          I didn't say she never used Windows. She attempted to use it for years (at least 5, I don't think she used the computer when we first got one). It was just too hard for her to get it to work right. She couldn't even figure out how to find Word.

          She doesn't ask for help. I live 250 miles away from her, and I've never gotten a call for help. I installed Ubuntu [i]specifically[/i] because I knew it would mean less (apparently, less now means "zero") tech support calls. My brother called once to ask "which one is like PowerPoint?" and my sister asked "what do I use for P2P?"

          She asked the first day what program to use to get email (Firefox--yahoo webmail) and which one is for typing (OOo Writer) and which one for expense reports (OOo Calc), and that was it. She doesn't play games, that's true. She says they're a waste of time and she doesn't have time to just sit there in front of a computer. I have a few installed on here, though (Battle for Wesnoth, FreeCiv, TuxRacer), and my brother and sister both know how to use Synaptic. She doesn't have sudo rights on here, so she can't install them herself anyway. I think it's safest if she doesn't have sudo rights, but if she did, I think she's a bit too afraid to touch system files anway. I'd just be afraid of her uninstalling the kernel or something.

          There is no WINE or VM or dual-booting or Cedega or Crossover on here. I don't use those. No computer over which I have authority is tainted with them.
          macoafi
  • Decisions, Decisions....

    As much as I want to wait for the Mac Book Pro, I really think Dell did something that is worth my support.

    I very well may get one of their laptops just for the fact that it offers me something that I think is worth while.

    I talked to a tech yesterday and he was pretty excited about the fact that they were selling Linux.

    I think the $50 dollar tax is off because you can get better hardware with Windows and very easily get free upgrades that are worth while, i.e. video card.
    nucrash
  • The skinny

    I noticed that I can't configure a Dell Ubuntu notebook with a video card with dedicated memory or with higher end sound card options. This is undoubtedly a driver support issue for ATI cards. ATI has offered Linux drivers in the past for its older desktop cards, so it will be interesting to see if this goads ATI into offering a more complete line of Linux drivers.

    On the plus side, all you get is a 30-day trial of Norton AV and a 15-month subscription costs $79. Computer Joe will obviously take note of this difference when Dell says that Ubuntu is relatively malware free and doesn't require security software. In fact, you always need to be sure to include the security tax when purchasing any MS product.
    Cornhead
    • ATI uses a proprietary driver

      ATI provides the drivers for Linux. They aren't bad but I wouldn't say they are great but you'll get a picture when they are loaded. Both ATI and GeForce have been pretty good at supporting Linux so it should be easy for you to pick up. In fact Dell should have them as part of their update. Take a few and poke around.
      maldain
      • True, but...

        ...some of the drivers for laptops are written specifically for their OEM's and are not available for download e.g. I have a Dell with the Mobility Radeon 9000 which I can only source from Dell.
        Cornhead
      • Well it's not like ATI has good Windows drivers either nt

        nt
        macoafi
  • The accused Ubuntu

    Having tried to install this wretched 'freebie' on my systems I had nothing but trouble!
    In trying to get it functional cost me Thousands of Dollars.
    Sounds good, looks good in reality stay with the professional OS?s.
    Remember the adage ?pay peanuts, you get monkeys??!
    I now fully understand the meaning of that phrase
    'Ubuntu' stick it where the ?monkey puts its nuts?
    Not for me, it will cost you money, be warned.
    jonjonthemighty
    • Steve?!

      Steve Ballmer?!?!
      I haven't seen you since forever! What are you doing these days? How are the anger management classes going?
      <smirk>
      handydan918
    • What?

      How did it cost you anything to use Ubuntu? The most it could cost is like $10 for an external modem if you're still using dialup and have a winmodem that lacks Linux drivers. Other than that, it doesn't cost anything. To spend thousands of dollars would require that you bought 10 years of support contracts.
      macoafi
  • Hard to use?

    My home brewed computer, which is a XPsp2 dual boot with Ubuntu Feisty Fawn 7.04, had a mouse freeze under XP. My wife, no computer geek, had to reboot and the system went to Ubuntu. The only question she had to ask "What's your login?" I showed her weeks ago where to find Firefox. The only reason I keep XP is that nbc.com requires Windows to view its programing. And cbs.com requires realplayer or windows media player. I found Limewire works better on Ubuntu than XR. I finally figured out wine. Now, if i could find a script writing program, I'm set. Hmmm. I need to find a howto for Abiword or Open Office. Looks like it's time to set up an account for my wife.
    pfyearwood