Most influential tech of 2007

Most influential tech of 2007

Summary: Well, 'tis the for lists, and since I'm still suffering from the effects of too much turkey, sherry and chocolate, and since I'm going to assume that many of you feel the same way, I'm not going to do anything that's too taxing today.

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TOPICS: CXO, IT Employment
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Well, 'tis the for lists, and since I'm still suffering from the effects of too much turkey, sherry and chocolate, and since I'm going to assume that many of you feel the same way, I'm not going to do anything that's too taxing today.

So, with that in mind, let's vote on the most influential tech products of 2007.  I've decided to extend the list to cover not just hardware but software and services too. 

So go on, vote for the most influential tech of 2007 ...

[poll id=248]

Topics: CXO, IT Employment

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36 comments
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  • Internet Radio toolkits

    Given the rapidly increasing number of users of Internet Radio station toolkits, I
    highly doubt anyone could accurately measure its influence. Maybe a voting model
    could be borrowed from the radio market where, even one caller/listener, gives
    weight as the leader of what is most popular to rank highest. The DJ simplies fills-in
    the rest based on his opinion.
    dascha1
  • VISTA??? VISTA????? You Have GOT To Be Kidding Me Right??

    PC World voted it the biggest FLOP of 2007!

    Influential? Yes..influential in getting countless new PC owners to switch back to XP.
    itanalyst
    • Ironic to pick Vista

      A product that actually lowered MSFT's influence in the tech world. I guess if you look at it through the fat end of the telescope it was influential in a negative way.

      Wii wins hands down in my book, then Ubuntu on Dell. Wii forever changed the way we interact with video games. The kind of disruptive technology that doesn't come along very often. There are senior centers with Wii bowling leagues. A video game console that changes the way we interact socially. Really quite amazing.

      Solid state HD's are evolutionary opposed to revolutionary. I'd put quad cores in the same category. Single core, dual core, quad core is evolution, not revolution.

      Funny mesh networking isn't on the list. Probably because it hasn't taken hold...yet. At least not here. That has the potential to be hugely disruptive. After that would be a store-and-forward schema that works on a mesh network. You'd actually be able to feel the shudder go through ISP's.
      Chad_z
      • Actually, you are incorrect

        [i]A product that actually lowered MSFT's influence in the tech world[/i]

        Not really, it actually raised it: the moment it was releasesd the rest of the industry began their "legal" campaigns against it:

        Apple started advertising [b]directlly[/i] against Windows, other companies (including Google) [i]ran[/i] (not walked) to their governments for help, and still Vista has outsold Macs and Linux installations combined, so no, it actually raised it to the top again.
        GuidingLight
        • Influence not profits

          I do think Vista has lowered Microsoft's influence on the tech world. Microsoft will make a bundle on Vista but sales numbers do not equal influence.
          voska1
          • You really have to be kidding

            Its almost heart breaking to watch people willingly make jack asses out of them selves while keeping a perfectly straight face and earnestly claiming that not only has Vista reduced Microsoft's profits but it has also lowered Microsoft's influence in the tech world. Its hard to think of what is scarier, someone thinking they can fool people even though they know better themselves, or perhaps worse yet they actually believe what they are saying, despite its obviously bogus claims for anyone who even dare to give a serious cursory look at the facts.

            I don't have any love for Vista myself; I certainly do not recommend anyone "upgrade" to Vista unless there is some weird reason they have too. I use Vista at work because it was made available, but I use XP at home and I will continue to do so for quite some time. But I'm not an idiot, like people who think, or want others to think that Vista has somehow diminished Microsoft's influence or that Microsoft's revenue has taken a bad hit somehow because of Vista. Try not hating a product so much you show a serious lack of brains by making claims that are blatantly false.
            Cayble
    • They also picked the Zune as "Editor's Choice"

      Not the ipod, but the Zune.

      Imagine that.
      GuidingLight
    • EXACTAMUNDO! >:)

      It's influential b/c it sucked so HARD, it hit the "unsinkable" MicroShaft like a notable North Atlantic iceberg....
      drprodny
    • Good or bad, influence is influence

      Whether it was good or bad, it was influential nonetheless - and the controversy just made it even more influential. Negative influence is still influence.
      CobraA1
  • 13% Voted For Vista LOL...

    I bet the same 13% live and die by AOL too.
    itanalyst
    • The poll says "influential"

      not "best". It's obviously influenced you to keep talking about it on almost every Talkback. So you ought to be part of that 13%.
      Michael Kelly
      • Sad But True

        But it did influence me to put it on one of my systems at home (thank God for educational MSDN) and after using it since June, will be moving back to XP on New Year's Day. So yes, it did influence me...to stay with XP on all my other systems.
        itanalyst
  • answered quad core

    but nmore generally trend in processors architecture, be it quad core rom intel or AMD, which are moreto come in 2008 than had come in 2007 since intel has not yet delivered true quad core, and AMD has not be able to ship promised chips.

    IBM is producing 9 core processor already, and SUN 8 cores processors.

    What is more promising from Intel was the succesfull switch to the core architecture and the capability of that architecture to scale properly, what netburst was not able to do.

    In the comming year we will see real 4 core processor for the mass market, and we will focus back on frequency. hopefully software editor will adapt their software to multicore architectures.

    Add to that virtualization capability now available on all processors, and you will have a real powerfull, and complex, infrstructure for software developper. the only problem is that no new Operating system is to come in a near future to take real advantage of these capabilities
    s_souche
    • It's because no new operating system will take advantage of quad-core

      that I did not vote for it. No one will look back at 2007 and say that was the year multi-core (or at least more than 2 cores) took over the computing industry. Where as they will look back at 2007 and say look at what the Wii did to for consoles (and those lessons learned can be applied to other sectors as well), and look at how the iPhone changed the way we look at the multi-function phone (although they left the door open for competitors).
      Michael Kelly
      • OSs do take advantage of multi Core

        All current OS on the market are massicely multi process and can attach proccess on different processor or core. Look at a basic desktop configuration were you have running at the same time thge kernel, the window manager, anti virus, software firewall, anti spyware, defrag, possibly software RAID, any level, backup, residant IM, email a web browser, plus quick launch for quicktime, real, productivity suite, plus a search index, indexing in the background.

        W/O any opened application, you already have processes by the tens that can take advantage of your different core. the only problem is that as long as you do not have multithreaded applications, you cannot take really advantage of moire than two cores in standard desktop environment ( i call standard desktop a situation were you do not have multiple application running - application that you are actually making use of, sleeping aplication do not count as they do not utilize CPU and sit idle )

        What operating systems are lacking right now in regards with new capabilities is really the support for virtualization. this will bring real process isolation, and enhence security and stability
        s_souche
        • OK, they don't take FULL advantage of multi-core

          How's that?

          I only run dual core, but many a time I've been peaking at 50% usage, because one core is doing all the work while the other one is idling. Yes, it does mean I can do other work now, but usually I want the high powered job to get the cycles.
          Michael Kelly
          • Thats not the OS's fault

            Thats caused by the application you are running not being multi-threaded.

            OSX for instance is fully multihtreaded. Any system functions use all cores available, as are all Apple applications. However, some third party apps are not multithreaded. Although this is a rarity these days as Apple has had dual processors for 8 years. On the Windows side of things, things are progressing slower.
            Stuka
          • Point taken

            However, that doesn't diminish my opinion that 2007 is not the year of the quad-core. Until they can be utilized to their full potential they are nothing more just another run of the mill speed boost, the kind we've been getting just about every year for decades. Until that speed gives us something that we didn't have before it's just another footnote.
            Michael Kelly
          • yes but

            what has the operating system to do with that. If a single threaded application would use twice the processing power offered by one core, there is no way an operating system could split that thread in two to load the two core, not now and not ever i'm afraid.
            s_souche
  • Voted for the Wii, but...

    I almost hit the "Ubuntu deal with Dell" choice. Time will tell if that really pans out the way I think it will.

    The Wii, however, has already proved that there's a HUGE casual gamer market with a need for a low-powered, low-cost, fun console. When you pass the sales of the all other major consoles, which have been out 2-3X as long, you know that means something.
    daengbo