Want to know what over 7,500 ZDNet readers think about copying digital media?

Want to know what over 7,500 ZDNet readers think about copying digital media?

Summary: Then get on over to Ed Bott's Microsoft Report, where his poll on digital media ethics has garnered an overwhelming, and highly educational, response.

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TOPICS: Hardware, CXO, Mobility
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Then get on over to Ed Bott's Microsoft Report, where his poll on digital media ethics has garnered an overwhelming, and highly educational, response.

Topics: Hardware, CXO, Mobility

Denise Howell

About Denise Howell

Denise Howell is an appellate, intellectual property and technology lawyer who enjoys broad industry recognition for her expertise on the intersection of emerging technologies and law.

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  • ...why is this needed?!

    (piggybacking maybe)
    not really needed though...
    Madsmasher
  • Needed because...

    Lots of folks who read my blog don't necessarily read the rest of ZDNet, and I think they'd be fascinated by the poll (as I've been).
    Denise Howell
  • Yes, it is needed...

    The recent increased pace of DRM/Piracy commentary spreading across publications like this, only brings the subject forward for more open dialog.

    It's apparent by reading less than half of the trackbacks this subject is either mis-understood or mis-comprehended by the thousand(s) of users. This lack of education only plays right into the hands of organizations like RIAA, MPAA who thrive on these same people. RIAA is proud of the fact their current scare tactic can be used as a solution to piracy.

    The industry saw an opportunity to distribute their content, they never considered this same technology would be used against them. The last time Spider Man was released, inside the package was an opportunity for you to "purchase" additional licenses for your other appliances, no mention of this is being released on this new version. "Fair Use" could use a little more clarity...
    bluegil
    • Confusion

      It's not so much that people are confused, I don't think. This situation is not particularly different to the attempt made towards the cassette tape and VCR industries in the 70s and 80s. Guess how they turned out? That's right - a person who purchases a legal copy of media can copy it for their personal use as many times as they want, as long as they don't distribute the material or collect revenues from them.

      This is the same thing. You should be allowed to copy your CDs to mp3s and put them on your iPod. You should be allowed to make a back-up copy, so you don't have to drag it in and out of the car daily. You know why? Because the Supreme Court said that you should be able to. The difference is the internet's role, and the ease of file sharing.

      What this poll says is not that people misunderstand - they see it as their right because they bought and paid for this media, and it's theirs (the ones that are distributing it, at least), and previous court cases back them up (without reference to new technologies, of course). What this poll really says is how incredibly out of touch the industry is.

      Lots of people are talking about refusing to purchase media at all until they straighten up. Never will they totally halt all sales. But the recent publicized over-blown cases they have tried to put on people and the brainless statements they have made, such as that copying a CD that you purchased to put it on your iPod is theft, they really need to watch out.

      It's only a matter of time before a class-action lawsuit takes place, provided they even still exist. If people keep pirating, they are going to keep themselves in court indefinately and end up shutting down the mainstream entertainment business as we know it.

      The lesson - don't screw around with customers. We don't like you telling us what we can and can't do with OUR stuff. Too many corporations and government bodies have forgotten recently that we don't work for them, they work for us. We hired them to do a job or provide a service, and we can fire them should the mood strike us.
      laura.b