Google's incomplete EULA climbdown

Google's incomplete EULA climbdown

Summary: While the world and his dog seem satisfied with the way Google's lawyers hastily red-lined the hated Clause 11.1 of the Chrome EULA, others may not be so pleased.

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TOPICS: Google
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While the world and his dog seem satisfied with the way Google's lawyers hastily red-lined the hated Clause 11.1 of the Chrome EULA, others may not be so pleased. This from the Spanish version:

11. Su licencia del Contenido

11.1 Conservará los derechos de autor y cualquier otro derecho que ya posea del Contenido que envíe, publique o muestre en los Servicios o a través de ellos. Al enviar, publicar o mostrar Contenido, estará concediendo a Google una licencia permanente, internacional, irrevocable, no exclusiva y que no está sujeta a derechos de autor para reproducir, adaptar, modificar, traducir, publicar, representar y mostrar públicamente, así como para distribuir cualquier Contenido que envíe, publique o muestre en los Servicios o a través de ellos. Esta licencia se otorga con el único propósito de permitir a Google publicar, distribuir y promocionar los Servicios y puede revocarse para determinados Servicios, según lo estipulado en las Condiciones adicionales asociadas.

Which roughly translated means: "We've not got around to fixing this license."  Color me stupid but when Google released Chrome, they didn't seem to have a problem getting all the language versions aligned.

Chris Mellor over at The Register reminds us:

Thaddeus P Fink, founder, chairman and CEO of Fink First, Cut 'n Paste, said he had a one-time-only, special offer deal for cutting out Completely Redundant Arcane Prose (think acronymically) from EULAs, and was open for further business. ®

Looks like FFCP still have work to do.

Update: Google finally got around to 'explain' their update position:

It will take a little time to propagate this change through the 40+ languages in which Google Chrome is available, and to remove the language in the download versions. But rest assured that we're working quickly to fix this. The new terms will of course be retroactive, and will cover everyone who has downloaded Google Chrome since it was launched.

So everyone's happy now.

Topic: Google

Dennis Howlett

About Dennis Howlett

Dennis Howlett is a 40 year veteran in enterprise IT, working with companies large and small across many industries. He endeavors to inform buyers in a no-nonsense manner and spares no vendor that comes under his microscope.

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3 comments
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  • Is this a story

    Given your first story on the EULA was about it being s total show stopper and they turned in round in less than a day I'm not sure what your point is of this second story which is that they apologise for not having modified the Spanish licence yet wow.

    I wonder why you didn't update your previous story to say correction EULA fixed.
    martin23
    • re: Is this a story

      [i]I wonder why you didn't update your previous story to say correction EULA fixed.[/i]

      That wouldn't be a correction. It would be an update.








      :)
      none none
    • OK

      I could have updated but given the fact there are more Spanish speakers in CA alone let alone English it warranted an extra piece. Plus, you must admit it is always worth poking at the Big Elephant in the room. Right?
      dahowlett@...