Next-generation students want careers in computing

Next-generation students want careers in computing

Summary: Generation Z, the term referring to today's teenagers who have yet to finish their studies or enter higher education, see the computing and technology industry as being their most likely choice of career.In an online survey of just over 1,800 Australian teenagers, those aged between 12 and 18, say they would rather land themselves a career in technology based jobs, rather than careers in graphics design, teaching and acting.

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TOPICS: Hardware
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Generation Z, the term referring to today's teenagers who have yet to finish their studies or enter higher education, see the computing and technology industry as being their most likely choice of career.

In an online survey of just over 1,800 Australian teenagers, those aged between 12 and 18, say they would rather land themselves a career in technology based jobs, rather than careers in graphics design, teaching and acting.

One of the main reasons teenagers seek out careers in the technology industry is that they see the industry as self-perpetuating and survivable through recessions and bouncing trends, as well as having secure career prospects.

According to the AAP, only 5% of teenagers surveyed see a career as an IT professional as "geeky or boring", whereas 30% wanted a career "on the cutting edge of technological developments".

Wouldn't we all?

As a bit of weekend banter, knowing what you know now about the length and breadth of how far technology goes in life - to mobile devices, space exploration, social networking and software development like we have never seen before - if you could go back to your teenage years and pick your ideal job or career, what would it be and why?

Topic: Hardware

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16 comments
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  • I will choose computer career.too

    I will choose computer career.too.Because I like surf on the internet.And I can study more in it.So I always think computer is a magical thing and I want to know about it and control it.
    clleady
    • Good luck

      Oh, that is EXACTLY a career in computers, isn't it. :)
      Being a journalist doesn't make you an computer scientist. And what do you mean by "control"? Push "play/pause" button?
      shoshonski
    • Good luck but...

      I dont want to be harsh cause you sound pretty young, but im sorry to say that IT careers that are based on "surfing the internet" are quite rare. And by rare I mean non existant. But still, "good luck out there budy, your gonna need it!"
      Tommy S.
  • RE: Next-generation students want careers in computing

    I will choose computer career,too.I always think computer is a magical thing and I can surf on in the interenet to study lots of things.So I want to know about the computer and control it.
    clleady
  • Technology != computer...

    Wow I thought that this article was abusing the facts...

    The article said technology. Technology does not imply
    computing. It implies a field that will in all likelihood
    including computing.
    serpentmage
    • You are playing with semantics

      Not to mention you're on ZDNet - a site that
      largely talks about *computing*. In case you
      hadn't noticed.

      Cheers,
      -M
      betelgeuse68
  • RE: Next-generation students want careers in computing

    Of course all everyone wants to be a programmer. 30% of my class mates wanted during the high school. When they understood that math is not an easy job, they quit. Everyone does :)
    It is PROVED ( i could give a link ) that even primates can handle programming ( it is just very simplified language after all ), but what hides behind it is kid of difficult - maths, science. So... keep your heads low for now, please...
    shoshonski
    • computing career != math!

      You need Scientific Method (cause/effect, rationality, ETC), and the
      ability to think logically. You also need a fair amount of creativity, if
      you are going to go anywhere with your computing career. Unless you
      are doing numeric computing, you probably don't need all that much
      math.

      Years ago, you probably actually needed math and science (you might
      actually have to rewire a computer and understand the circuits). In the
      recent past, you needed proficiency with math and science to gain
      access to computers. Nowadays many kids are probably using a
      computer before they can count!

      The main issue is simply supply and demand. Huge supply, reduced
      demand, and you'll find yourself working for free (if you are working
      at all).
      a.barry@...
      • I agree...

        I totally suck at math but I managed to write and evolve an entire suite of telephony-based software over the past 20+ years which is installed hundreds of customers around the world.
        Too_Busy_To_Be_Here
  • good luck with that

    If you are looking at the unemployment line or minimum wage in 10 years from now, go ahead!
    Linux Geek
  • I think this is highly indicative of the country in which the survey...

    was conducted. Australia's (highly limited) GDP is
    become more and more reliant on information based
    industries. Australia has always been at a
    disadvantage due to environment and distance, factors
    which make is more difficult and expensive to deliver
    their goods and materials to prospective importers.

    Not to start in on my opinion on everyone except the
    US viewing exports as the saviour to their economies,
    I will say that cutting logistics out of the picture
    and being able to deliver intangible products is an
    ideal solution most of Australia's historic problems.
    Spiritusindomit@...
  • RE: Next-generation students want careers in computing

    - if you could go back to your teenage years and pick your ideal job or career, what would it be and why?

    I would pick exactly what I ended up doing anyway. It was difficult to plan a career in microprocessor based hardware and software development when I was a teenager in the early & mid 1970s - but somehow at that time, by chance and good fortune, I landed a job as a tech testing, debugging, and repairing 8080 based systems. It set the tone of my entire career, and now I'm a Director of Engineering after spending over 30 years developing microprocessor-based systems. The only thing I might do different.... beat Bill Gates to punch in producing BASIC for the Altair 8800, then create a better O/S than either MSDOS or Windows (technically, it would have been easy) to dominate the Personal Computer market.
    rogerd@...
  • RE: Next-generation students want careers in computing

    Computer science or electrical engineering is WAY TOO HARD. There's all that icky math, and I hated trying to learn a bubble sort.
    MSFTWorshipper
  • RE: "CompSci is 'way too hard'..."

    Yep. The dummies went to work for the FBI and the NSA, but the smart kids went to work for Apple and Google. That is why the USA is in the shape that it is now.

    The future of CompSci had better include some really amazing things (eg "TRUE" A.I. ala "HAL9000" stuff), or this country will be only service oriented industies (i.e. "Does ya want fries with ya order?")
    metilley@...
    • CompSci today = Physical sciences around 1900

      I haven't really seen anything amazing come out of CompSci. The main trend seems
      to be computers are getting smaller, faster, cheaper, and more interconnected and
      new products and applications are little more than unimaginative foregone
      conclusions.

      OK - so it's now cost-effective to create a robot vacuum cleaner (which does nothing
      else), an MP3 player which plays pre-recorded music (rather than composing it on the
      spot), a computer disguised as a cell phone (that in a few years will function like the
      desktop computers of yesterday), Computerized medical records (what took them so
      long - banks have been computerized for years), and other so-called innovations.

      It's almost like CompSci today is like the physical sciences at the turn of the last
      century - nothing really new except for refinements to the right of the decimal. I also
      don't see an Einstein, Watson/Crick, or Turing waiting in the wings.
      a.barry@...
  • Next-generation students want careers in computing

    thank so much for your post. It is useful information for someone.
    panda88