TeenTech Weekly: Employing the Gen-Y

TeenTech Weekly: Employing the Gen-Y

Summary: A special edition of TeenTech Weekly: Businesses, employment and the Gen-Y.

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TOPICS: IT Employment
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This edition of TeenTech weekly rounds up Generation Y and student news that you may have missed. This week is a special, featuring the analysis and opinions of industries when it comes down to the employability of Generation Y.

1.) "More than money": The rise of the graduate social entrepreneur. (The Guardian)

Record levels of graduate unemployment coupled with a growing social conscience amongst 'Generation Y' have fuelled a rise in the number of students and graduates setting up social enterprises.

2.) Generation Lost? Millennials come of age. (Reuters)

If your birth year is essentially a genetic lottery, which drops you into the economic circumstances of the day, then it's no exaggeration to say that the 70 million millennials -- or Generation Y, those born in the 1980s and '90s -- appear to have lost that lottery.

3.) Energy drink regs will offer no relief to exhausted Generation Y. (Fox News)

Generation Y is struggling. Seventy-seven percent of young Americans are delaying major life changes due to the depressed economy. They are exhausted from overloaded schedules. They are bleary-eyed from scanning job boards. They are anxious about paying off their student loans, particularly since student loan debt surpassed credit card debt last year. They are scared about their future.

4.) Millennials vs. Baby Boomers: Who Would You Rather Hire? (Time)

A new poll reveals just how different Gen Y workers are from their Baby Boomer forefathers. Among other things, millennials (those in their 20s and early 30s) want flexible work schedules, more 'me time' on the job, and nearly nonstop feedback and career advice from managers. They're also more likely than average to think the boss could learn a thing or two from their young employees. Oh, and they really want to be able to wear jeans at work.

5.) Why Gen Y can't get a job: No Gumption, No Get Up and Go. (Daily Finance)

Despite 8.3 percent nationwide unemployment, members of America's latest alphanumeric generation exhibit little of the gumption that helped prior generations survive their own economic troubles.

6.) Millennials are going to be leaders in ways we've never 'experienced or imagined'. (Business Insider)

By 2025, young people will make up roughly 75 percent of the world's employees. The problem is they're so vastly different from the previous generations, it can be a major conflict in the workplace.

7.) Trendy fads won't help your career. (CBS News)

There are thousands, maybe millions of people out there who are trying to get ahead, just like you. The only difference is they've figured out how to make money by selling you on all sorts of trendy myths and fads, meaningless fluff that masquerades as self-help or career advice. Gen Y consultants, personal branding "gurus," career and life coaches -- they're all over the blogosphere and social media.

8.) 4 Money Lessons For Generation Y. (SF Gate)

Since the Great Recession of 2008 and 2009, the financial rules that most Americans operated under have changed and it might be the fact that Generation Y was in the sweet spot of the economic downturn that has caused them to redefine their beliefs about money.

9.) Who’d hire a Gen-Y? (Smart company)

They can be demanding and impatient – but some of the traits that so infuriate many bosses can also make Gen-Ys outstanding employees. It’s a matter of channelling the energy.

10.) More than half of global workforce considering job change. (Market Watch)

Employees across the globe have experienced unprecedented economic turmoil, and, as a result, are restless regarding future career goals. Many are unhappy in their jobs and are actively searching for new opportunities. Others are content with their current employment position but are seeking greater engagement and meaning from their positions.

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Topic: IT Employment

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8 comments
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  • Y @ O @ U... M @ U @ S @ T.... S @ E @ E!!!!!!

    as Bruce implied I didnt even know that anyone can earn $7334 in 4 weeks on the internet. have you seen this web page <b>http://tomakeusd.blogspot.in/<b>
    Alissa242
  • AGREED with #4!

    "A new poll reveals just how different Gen Y workers are from their Baby Boomer forefathers. Among other things, millennials (those in their 20s and early 30s) want flexible work schedules, more ???me time??? on the job, and nearly nonstop feedback and career advice from managers. They???re also more likely than average to think the boss could learn a thing or two from their young employees. Oh, and they really want to be able to wear jeans at work."

    This defines me perfectly! Sorry, baby boomers, but the times are a changin'.
    The one and only, Cylon Centurion
    • You have to EARN your place before wanting more ....

      I don't see any problem with wearing jeans ... as long as the person is dressed appropriately when the time is needed (ie: during scheduled meetings with VIPs). But the rest is something else:

      - Flexible work schedule is earned by demonstrating that the worker is RESPONSIBLE, RELIABLE and a true solid performer. When the company knows that the person can deliver in time and without mayor problems, then that person earns the right to be in a flexible environment.

      - More "me" time on the job: You are getting paid to do a work, not to take care of your personal mental issue.

      - Non-stop feedback: You are a freaking professional, not a breast feeding baby that requires constant attention.

      - Career advice from managers: You can ASK an occasional question and advice. But before you can talk "career" you have to SHOW THAT YOU CAN DO THE JOB. Learn to walk before signing up to a triathlon.

      - Boss could learn a thing or two from their young employees is something that in rare occasions is true, but most of the time is just that the ignorant employee (of any age, not only the young ones) thinks that he has a clue when in fact he/she doesn't.
      wackoae
      • Don't get me wrong...

        ... I clean up very nicely. But I agree with wanting to wear more casual clothing, and a more relaxed workplace. It's a dream of mine to earn enough respect at a place that I could walk in dressed similarly to the goth chick on NCIS, and no one would care.
        Honestly, I never liked suits and ties. I don't feel myself when I wear them (I can count on maybe two hands the times I've ever worn a suit in my lifetime), and I hate that. If I'm not feeling myself, then that isn't helping the company.
        I can deal with business causal, but I've often expressed my extreame displeasure of workplace attire. Don't get me wrong, I am by no means a slob, but donning a suit everyday is just the same as donning a school uniform.
        But just because I may dress differently, doesn't mean I'm not a hard worker. I'll go to great lengths to get my work done, but I want to feel compfortable, relaxed, and more importantly, I don't want to feel constrained while doing it.

        Also, a little "me" time at work goes a long way with your employee's well being. After all, your employees are human, and workplace stress does a company no good. You can't throw a person behind a cubicle and flourescent lighting, and expect them to be productive.
        I think a little on the job R&R or personal time could go a long way towards boosting comapny productivity.
        The one and only, Cylon Centurion
      • Depends.

        "I don't see any problem with wearing jeans ... as long as the person is dressed appropriately when the time is needed (ie: during scheduled meetings with VIPs)."

        Unless, of course, your name is Steve Jobs.
        smulji
      • From another perspective

        -Flexible work schedule: GIVES the worker the responsibility. He can make changes to his personal work schedule to the benefit of both parties. But at the end (the deadline) there have to be results, flexible or fixed schedule. If not you're fired, same thing when using a fixed work schedule. I don't see why, someone has to earn a flexible work schedule. A flexible schedule is not a privilege its just another type of schedule.

        - More "me" time. Personally I'm part of a team on the workfloor. If one member of the team has an issue the whole team can suffer from it. And those issues can be "job" related. So a bit of "me" time leads to a better team and that gives again better result. It is always nice when the "Boss" asks "how are you, everything OK?". It shows that he cares about you. That you are more than just an employee. We are humans, not machines and even machines need a checkup sometimes. Communication is important and managers know it, that's why they invented team building events.

        - Non-stop feedback: Even proffesionals make mistakes and should ask feedback when they can. It's all in the process of learning/growing. There is no knowItAllSuperHumanBeing, everyone makes mistakes and should learn from them. We live in a competitive society.

        -Carreer advice: Qoute from Eleanor Roosevelt - "Learn from the mistakes of others. You can't live long enough to make them all yourself." 'Older' people tend to have more experience in lots of areas. It is wise to use it.
        But I agree you can't ask for career advice on day 1, you have to show that you are a capable person. But don't wait too long, you will miss opportunities.

        Kind regards,

        A hard working GenY member
        Subridens
      • Generation-Y Psychobabble...

        @Cylon Centurinon

        "If I'm not feeling myself, then that isn't helping the company. "
        "a little "me" time at work goes a long way with your employee's well being. "
        "You can't throw a person behind a cubicle and flourescent lighting, and expect them to be productive. "

        And I'm sure that we should stop awarding failing marks to kids in elementary school because it might damage their self-esteem.

        I work with PLENTY of people who sit behind a cubicle, wearing a suit, and are given a very wide berth (ie, little direction or feedback from management, other than we know our jobs and responsibilities), and yet we manage to be successful, have very low employee turnover, and to boot, we have clients that see us as the professionals we are.

        You want to wear jeans and a t-shirt and "shoot the sh*t" with your boss all day, learn a trade or pick up a shovel; don't expect to work downtown.
        daftkey
    • Sorry alright, but not as you think...

      See we employ people and we're looking for particular traits. We employ those with these traits, and given the pool of available talent in a depressed economy we've plenty of choice.

      Good news for GenY though; they can wear jeans and offer their advice as much as they like. It just wont be at work. Enjoy;-)
      Richard Flude