Forrester: Windows 7 powering 21 percent of corporate desktops; XP still at 60 percent

Forrester: Windows 7 powering 21 percent of corporate desktops; XP still at 60 percent

Summary: By the end of March 2011, Windows 7 was powering 20.9 percent of corporate desktops, according to a new Forrester Research report, while Windows XP was on 60 percent of business PCs.

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By the end of March 2011, Windows 7 was powering 20.9 percent of corporate PCs, according to a new Forrester Research report, while Windows XP was on 60 percent of business PCs -- down from 69 percent a year ago.

Forrester's report, "Corporate Desktop Operating System And Browser Trends, Q2 2010 To Q2 2011" included results from Forrester's analysis of more than 400,000 client PCs at 2,500 companies. The June 16 report includes 12 months of data collected between the start of the second calendar quarter of 2010 through the end of the first calendar quarter of 2011.

(click on the chart above to enlarge)

As hardware continues to age, the Windows 7 deployment pace is accelerating, the Forrester researchers said, as "I&O (infrastructure and operations) teams tie their upgrade into the natural PC refresh cycle of their business."

On brand-new PCs being deployed by businesses, Windows 7 usage is even higher (at 31 percent). Forrester is predicting that number (Windows 7 deployment on brand new business PCs) will hit 83 percent within a year.

Adding to the Windows 7 upgrade pace is the fact that Windows Vista is on its way out, the researchers said. "Windows Vista adoption peaked at nearly 14% in November 2009, and its share has since shrunk in half as firms upgrade their employees to Windows 7 Service Pack 1 (SP1)."

Windows XP share was also down among business users over the past year, Forrester noted, declining 9 points, to 60 percent. But XP still remains, by a long shot, the "most widely deployed desktop OS" among those surveyed.

As other market watchers have found, on the browser share side, Microsoft isn't faring as well as it is with Windows -- despite the fact that IE 8 was bundled with Windows 7.

Overall Internet Explorer usage declined over the past year, as users abandoned IE 6 for Firefox, Chrome and IE 8, Forrester found. (IE 9 adoption didn't figure into this report, as the final version of IE 9 wasn't released until mid-March 2011.)

From the report:

"Overall IE use is slowly eroding as firms replace legacy Windows XP systems with IE6. In fact, through March 2011, IE use declined to 58.7%. As firms deploy Windows 7, I&O managers need to ensure that their web applications are compatible with IE8."

Google's Chrome browser is gaining wide acceptance among enterprise users, reaching 14 percent share among those surveyed by Forrester by the end of Q'1 2011. Firefox usage was nearly 18 percent by the end of March among the surveyed base, a solid number that Forrester researchers attributed to Firefox's firm entrenchment within many businesses "thanks to the proliferation of add-ons that simplify and automate everyday tasks."

Topics: Windows, Browser, Hardware, Microsoft, Operating Systems, Software

About

Mary Jo has covered the tech industry for 30 years for a variety of publications and Web sites, and is a frequent guest on radio, TV and podcasts, speaking about all things Microsoft-related. She is the author of Microsoft 2.0: How Microsoft plans to stay relevant in the post-Gates era (John Wiley & Sons, 2008).

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  • RE: Forrester: Windows 7 powering 21 percent of corporate desktops; XP still at 60 percent

    Boo! Get XP off those systems! This isn't 2006 anymore.<br><br>1,025 days and counting. :)

    <I>"Google?s Chrome browser is gaining wide acceptance among enterprise users, reaching 14 percent share among those surveyed by Forrester by the end of Q?1 2011."</I>

    Is it really? Or is it just being snuck onto machines, as a result of installing to the user folder (Which doesn't require admin rights, BTW), instead of to the Program Files folder? Last I heard, this was causing headaches for admins.
    The one and only, Cylon Centurion
    • RE: Forrester: Windows 7 powering 21 percent of corporate desktops; XP still at 60 percent

      @Cylon Centurion
      Any 3rd party browser can be installed in the user folder like so many programs can be..
      Why would you need admin rights to install a program ? ?
      Anthony E
      • RE: Forrester: Windows 7 powering 21 percent of corporate desktops; XP still at 60 percent

        @Anthony E

        <I>"Why would you need admin rights to install a program ? ?"</I>

        Think about that for a second. Those admin rights exist for a reason. Especially in corporate networks where control of the system is crucial.
        The one and only, Cylon Centurion
      • RE: Forrester: Windows 7 powering 21 percent of corporate desktops; XP still at 60 percent

        @Cylon Centurion
        Are these the same admin rights that people get on XP about that they shouldn't have ? ?
        Anthony E
      • RE: Forrester: Windows 7 powering 21 percent of corporate desktops; XP still at 60 percent

        @Anthony E <br><br>Yes and no. XP's security is so far beyond inadequate, that I just choose to ignore it. I'm more talking about the admin rights system administrators impose on corporate machines. Unfortunately, installing to the user folder bypasses not only UAC on Vista and 7, but those admin rights as well, therefore adding software to a network which really, has no right to be there and poses a threat to the network.<br><br>Installing untrusted or unknown softwares violates Computer Usage Policies, and opens up potential attack vectors. Doing so without the system administrator's knowledge makes it all the more dangerous as they cannot then take that into consideration when setting up security policies on the network. Unfortunately, it seems Google doesn't care. Why? I have no idea. <br><br>I think Microsoft should release a patch that triggers the UAC for software installing to the user folder.
        The one and only, Cylon Centurion
      • I have to disagree with you here.

        @Cylon Centurion: <i>XP's security is so far beyond inadequate, that I just choose to ignore it.</i><br><br>XP's security is quite good. The problem is it was effectively bypassed because most people ran with administrative privileges. Run XP as a non-privileged user and XP was quite secure. I ran my Windows 2000 (I never did have a personal copy of XP) systems this way and never had any problems with malware.
        ye
      • Yes, Chrome is sneaking in

        @Anthony E
        Indeed, that is probably the single most important security issue with Chrome. Because it is not installed into a protected location, malware *can also change* Chrome at will. This will not compromise the entire system, but it will compromise anything the user does through Chrome.

        However, concerned admins can simply push a group policy which disallows executing code from the users folders.
        honeymonster
      • RE: Forrester: Windows 7 powering 21 percent of corporate desktops; XP still at 60 percent

        @Anthony E
        "Why would you need admin rights to install a program ? ?"

        Are you for real?
        saf312
      • RE: Forrester: Windows 7 powering 21 percent of corporate desktops; XP still at 60 percent

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    • RE: Forrester: Windows 7 powering 21 percent of corporate desktops; XP still at 60 percent

      @Cylon Centurion

      It sneaks onto machines just like the Google Toolbar and Ask Toolbar when users install that they should not. While Staff and Students in my organization do not have admin rights to the computer some things can still be installed.
      bobiroc
      • RE: Forrester: Windows 7 powering 21 percent of corporate desktops; XP still at 60 percent

        @bobiroc Agreed - Both GoogleToolbar & Ask ToolBar as adware being added in by force... I didn't even click accept and the flippin' Ask Toolbar added it's nasty lil program in.
        jessiethe3rd
    • RE: Forrester: Windows 7 powering 21 percent of corporate desktops; XP still at 60 percent

      @Cylon Centurion
      Browser share is estimated by web site visits. Something may be installed in the user's folder, but if it is not being engaged to browse, it won't tick the counters.
      DannyO_0x98
    • Are YOU willing to pay for the upgrade?

      @Cylon Centurion
      mrs.lisas
    • RE: Forrester: Windows 7 powering 21 percent of corporate desktops; XP still at 60 percent

      @Cylon Centurion i am totally agree with you that every admin have a reason for in corporate networks and they control those system in crucial. <a href="http://www.paperprofs.com/writing-types/book-report/">buy book report</a> | <a href="http://www.paperprofs.com/writing-types/admission-essays/">Admission essay help</a> | <a href="http://www.paperprofs.com/writing-types/thesis/">thesis help</a>
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    • RE: Forrester: Windows 7 powering 21 percent of corporate desktops; XP still at 60 percent

      @Cylon Centurion Are these the same admin rights that people get on XP about that they shouldn't have ? ? <a href="http://www.profischnell.com">Technische Uebersetzung</a> <a href="http://www.profi-fachuebersetzung.de">Technische Uebersetzung</a> <a href="http://www.uebersetzung-deutsch-englisch.com">Englische Uebersetzung</a>
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  • Mac OS X at 11% ... hmm

    Interesting that Mac OS X has such high share (11%) even in the corporate desktop scene. It looks like it has grown ~20% year over year (from 9% to 11%).
    xameleon
    • Steve Jobs said there are 55 million active Mac Users

      @xameleon So its basically been flat for the past 20 years. Windows still dominates with 1.2 billion users world wide.
      Mr. Dee
      • Not flat -- Apple had just about 25 million users six years ago

        @Mr. Dee
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