IDC: Windows Server still rules the server roost

IDC: Windows Server still rules the server roost

Summary: The new first quarter 2010 International Data Corp. numbers are out for the worldwide server market. According to the market researcher, Windows Server is still the runaway leader, in terms of operating system unit shipments, and also still in first place when it comes to revenues compared to Unix and Linux.

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The new first quarter 2010 International Data Corp. numbers are out for the worldwide server market. According to the market researcher, Windows Server is still the runaway leader, in terms of operating system unit shipments, and also still in first place when it comes to revenues compared to Unix and Linux.

In Q1 2010, Windows Server was installed on 75.3 percent of the servers sold worldwide. Linux was on 20.8 percent of the servers and Unix on only 3.6 percent. Both Windows Server and Linux grew in share from Q4 2009 to Q1 2010; Unix declined slightly.

On the revenue side of the house, Windows Server-based systems brought in 48.9 percent of the dollars worldwide, IDC said. Unix was No. 2 with 22 percent and Linux, third, with 16.2 percent. As in the case of units, Unix-based systems lost share between Q4 2009 and Q1 2010.

Here are IDC's latest figures, as well as the comparable IDC data for Q4 2009. Note the percentages don't total 100. That is because IDC includes an unspecified "other" category that is not included here.

Q1 2010 units

Windows 1,379,487  (75.3%) Unix            65,451    (3.6%) Linux        380,429   (20.8%)

Q4 2009 units

Windows  1,434,225 (73.9%) Unix              84,851 ( 4.4%) Linux           412,041 (21.2%)

Q1 2010 dollars

Windows  $5.1 billion (48.9%) Unix        $2.3 billion (22.2%) Linux       $1.7 billion (16.2%)

Q4 2009 dollars

Windows  $5.4 billion (41.6%) Unix        $3.9 billion (29.9%) Linux       $1.9 billion (14.7%)

A few more observations from IDC's latest report:

  • Microsoft Windows server demand was positively impacted by the accelerating x86 server market, as hardware revenue increased 33.6% and unit shipments increased 28.3% year over year.

  • Quarterly revenue of $5.1 billion for Windows servers represented 48.9% of overall quarterly factory revenue. This is the highest percentage of server hardware revenue that Windows servers have ever represented.
  • Unix servers experienced 29.0% revenue decline when compared to 1Q09 as customers waited for additional detail on the Sun-Oracle server roadmap. They were also anticipating a ramp of IBM POWER7 servers, which began shipping in Q1, and, separately, HP Integrity servers based on Intel Itanium 9300 processors that were announced in April. Worldwide Unix revenues were $2.3 billion for the quarter, representing 22.2% of quarterly server spending (down 10.5 points over 1Q09).

Microsoft is expected to deliver a first beta of Windows Server 2008 R2 Service Pack (SP) 1 -- and, by extension, Windows 7 SP1 -- any time now. I wouldn't be surprised to see the Softies announce and/or deliver that beta next week, in conjunction with the company's Tech Ed conference. Even though Microsoft has been advising IT admins not to wait for SP1 to move to Windows Server 2008 R2, a number of organizations still insist on waiting for SP1 before moving to a new version of Windows.

Microsoft officials said earlier this year that Windows 7 SP1 would be a conglomeration of bug fixes and updates, and would not include any new features. On the server side, SP1 will include two new virtualiztion features, Microsoft officials have said.

These new features include a new graphics acceleration platform, known as RemoteFX, that is based on desktop-remoting technology that Microsoft obtained in 2008 when it acquired Calista Technologies. There also will be a new addition to Hyper-V that will dynamically adjust memory of a guest virtual machine on demand.

Topics: Operating Systems, Hardware, Linux, Open Source, Servers, Software, Windows

About

Mary Jo has covered the tech industry for 30 years for a variety of publications and Web sites, and is a frequent guest on radio, TV and podcasts, speaking about all things Microsoft-related. She is the author of Microsoft 2.0: How Microsoft plans to stay relevant in the post-Gates era (John Wiley & Sons, 2008).

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73 comments
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  • Message has been deleted.

    FADS_z
    • Message has been deleted.

      itkonlyyou97
    • RE: IDC: Windows Server still rules the server roost

      @FADS_z They are usually just pebbles.
      crypt2121
  • One 'minor' problem

    You don't have to buy Linux so...

    I have two words to describe your your stats

    <b style="font-size:30px">BO GUS</b>.

    Well guess that's huge problem after all.
    OS Reload
    • RE: IDC: Windows Server still rules the server roost

      @OS Reload These are the numbers for new hardware purchased. Even Linux needs a computer to run on, and the vast majority of company don't re-purpose existing hardware or buy hardware from a guy in a van on the side of the road.
      rshores
      • RE: IDC: Windows Server still rules the server roost

        @rshores Many people who run Linux on servers buy them bare metal, and install their own image - I'm assuming such purchases wouldn't show up in the OS stats. I also suspect that happens a lot less with Windows, since licensing Windows with the server as part of the sale is usually a savings.

        And I've seen quite a bit of repurposing, btw.

        They're _sales_ statistics -- just have to understand them in context.
        daboochmeister
      • RE: IDC: Windows Server still rules the server roost

        @daboochmeister - replace "many" with "some" and I'll agree with you. There are SOME people who DO install Linux on their own re-purposed/hand-built/purchased PC servers and then deploy said servers into production environments.

        MOST servers in production, however, are purchased with a supported version of Linux because most companies are not in the business of, and do not have, want or need the skills to maintain, their own Linux disro'.

        MOST businesses are in their core business. VERY few of those businesses' business is in the creation and maintenance of their own customized Linux distro'.
        de-void-21165590650301806002836337787023
      • Understand what is measured

        Mary writes:<br><br>"In Q1 2010, Windows Server was installed on 75.3 percent of the servers sold worldwide"<br><br>The IDC report tracks factory revenue. It measures factory installs.<br><br>Devoid, rarely are production Linux servers shipped with an OS. Thanks to the service model of companies like RedHat and Novell it is easier to manage licenses through their programs directly.<br><br>The same applies to large corporate for windows.<br><br>I suspect the IDC figures are skewed towards the small business market, who buy 1 license at a time. MS SBS is a strong offering in this market.

        The good news (from report linked):
        "Linux server demand also improved sharply in 1Q10, with revenue growing 20.4% to $1.7 billion when compared with the first quarter of 2009. Linux servers now represent 16.2% of all server revenue, up 2.1 points over 1Q09."
        Richard Flude
      • That's not how it works on servers

        @OS Reload: stop pushing this false argument. Your theory works against desktops and laptops which almost always come with Windows pre-loaded, but servers are easily found with the option of NO OS pre-installed. Anyone that intends to install Linux would not pay extra for a Windows Server license at purchase time when they have the option of no OS. Actually, even many Windows shops pick this option as well, since they have Windows licenses already.
        blu_vg9
      • RE: IDC: Windows Server still rules the server roost

        @rshores

        This whole post is nothing but self serving smoke and mirrors. All it really says is that in the minority of servers (those purchased WITH operating systems pre-installed) Linux has managed to corner a full 20+ % of the market. Of the vast majority of server sales (ones sold without operating systems pre-installed) Linux dominates. Once again this kind of article proves nothing by using bogus agenda slanted data.
        As they say: There are Lie's, Damn Lies and statistics and this blog is proof positive.
        bobtran
    • "BooHoo, I hate the truth!"

      There, OS Reload, I've picked out the precise meaning of your words.

      [i]Well guess that's huge problem after all.[/i]

      It sure is. For Linux that is. :)
      John Zern
      • Tell 2 big Internet names, just two, that switched from Linux to windows

        @John Zern

        Also, on the big business side we have the London Stock Exchange which after a much publicized Microsoft deployment was forced to dump Windows .Net and buy a Linux firm just to be able to compete in the financial markets.
        OS Reload
      • And I know of a small business who tried to bring up a Linux web server.

        @OS Reload: The Windows admin couldn't get it to work and ended up dumping it for a Windows solution. Seems Linux isn't up to the task of serving web pages.

        With that said I assume you had a point?
        ye
      • @ye: Well... FAIL! You just made a fool out of yourself.

        Congratulations.
        OS Reload
      • How so?

        @OS Reload: [i]Well... FAIL! You just made a fool out of yourself.[/i]
        ye
      • @ye: Do you need to ask, REALLY?

        Read what what you wrote above...

        and Enjoy!
        OS Reload
      • Yes, I really do need to ask.

        @OS Reload: I'd like you to explain how a failing of Linux reflects negatively on me.
        ye
      • @ye: You failed to configure a simple web server

        That small business made the huge mistake of handing you a simple job and you (purposefully or otherwise) failed.

        How does that make you look?
        OS Reload
      • So it was me and not the OS?

        @OS Reload: <i>That small business made the huge mistake of handing you a simple job and you (purposefully or otherwise) failed.</i><br><br>So what you're saying is the person/people performing the work are a factor in its success or failure. And that it's not solely limited to which OS is used. Thank you for making my point. Now think how it might apply to the London Stock Exchange.<br><br>And for the record there really was no actual business in my initial statement. It was created so I could show you how foolish your statement of the LSE was.<br><br>You're welcome.
        ye
      • @ye: the LSE problem was .Net being 30 times slower than their competitors

        and yes, people were the problem there (in the end aren't they always?), Microsoft and Accenture salespeople to be exact, they fooled the LSE into Microsoft while competitors went with Unix/Linux systems that were able to perform 30 transactions while .Net performed just one.

        Microsoft people invested heavily into publicizing the LSE deployment only to have it blow on their faces two years later.
        OS Reload