Microsoft: 400 million Windows 7 and 100 million Office 2010 licenses sold (and more partner conference stats)

Microsoft: 400 million Windows 7 and 100 million Office 2010 licenses sold (and more partner conference stats)

Summary: Microsoft's Day 1 keynote from the Worldwide Partner Conference in Los Angeles didn't feature much product news. But there were a lot of stats thrown at the 12,000 or so partners in attendance on July 11.

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Microsoft's Day 1 keynote from the Worldwide Partner Conference in Los Angeles didn't feature much product news. But there were a lot of stats thrown at the 12,000 or so partners in attendance on July 11.

I've rounded up the claims from CEO Steve Ballmer, Windows/Windows Live CFO Tammi Reller and Partner Chief Jon Roskill here:

400,000,000: The number of Windows 7 licenses sold to date

100,000,000: The number of Office 2010 licenses sold to date 50,000: The number of businesses that have tried Office 365 (via its trial program) in the past two weeks 41,000: The number of Microsoft partners now who identify themselves primarily as cloud partners 1,000: The number of days until Microsoft stops supporting Windows XP (Note: end of support doesn't mean users can't still run the product)

76: The percentage of servers that ship with Windows on them

62: Number of days until the third Microsoft-sanctioned disclosure about Windows 8 at the Build conference

36: Number of times Reller said "Windows 8" during her keynote remarks (without actually sharing anything new about the coming OS)

8.70: The amount Microsoft partners make for every $1.00 that Microsoft makes.

2: The number of public updates Microsoft has provided about Windows 8 (CES 2011 in January and AllThingsD/Computex in June)

"Transition" was the key word for me at the partner conference this morning. Microsoft is attempting to get partners to transition to the cloud more quickly. Company officials are working to transition from viewing technologies like Bing and Xbox as consumer-only technologies and think about how they might be able to be used for business. And Microsoft is seeking a way to help partners transition from Windows 7 to Window 8 without having the bottom drop out of the Windows 7 market.

Just as they did with Vista when Windows 7 was on the horizon, MIcrosoft execs are emphasizing to partners that there's still life left in the current version of Windows, in spite of all the interest about Windows 8. Microsoft's guidance is to get partners to sell customers on moving to Windows 7, IE 9 and Office 2010 now to ease their transition to Windows 8, IE 10 and Office 15. It's tough to be between product cycles, as the Softies are right now with Windows and Office, but that's where things are right now....

More from Microsoft Partner Conference:

Windows 8 will run on all Windows 7 PCs (and Vista PCs too)

Microsoft: In a year, Windows Phone has gone from very small to ... very small

Microsoft makes it official: New beta of Windows Intune 2.0 available

Third test build of Microsoft's SQL Server 'Denali' expected this week

What's on Steve Ballmer's Microsoft priority list now?

Microsoft to deliver Surface 2.0 software developer kit on July 12

Why Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer is so bullish on Bing

Microsoft to deliver Surface 2.0 software developer kit on July 12

Topics: Operating Systems, Microsoft, Software, Windows

About

Mary Jo has covered the tech industry for 30 years for a variety of publications and Web sites, and is a frequent guest on radio, TV and podcasts, speaking about all things Microsoft-related. She is the author of Microsoft 2.0: How Microsoft plans to stay relevant in the post-Gates era (John Wiley & Sons, 2008).

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  • Brokering services.

    One thing I believe Bing should do, is broker services. E.g. companies or groups that have large repositories of data not found on the web, could make their data available via services which could be licensed to developers to use. E.g. the National Institutes of Health, could have its data be available through Bing, which could be incorporated into business, line-of-business, or consumer apps by developers. Developers could therefore search through a directory of services offered by Bing, and easily incorporate the services into their apps. Many of these services could be powered by local implementations of Bing, making them easily searchable. This means that full, rich data for such things as a local museum could be made available as a service; and a developer could easily create an app on museums of a certain type (e.g. natural history) found around the world, by incorporating several of these services into his app. The app would contain information that is deeper and richer than what could be found on the web, which would be more ?monetizable?.

    The above is great, because it allows Bing to capture lots of information beyond what is found on web pages, and encourages monetization of this data beyond advertising alone. Further down the line, MS could sell companies on the idea of powering their services using local Bing based implementations, which use standard data formats that go significantly beyond HTML, further differentiating itself from Google, and other HTML based search engine services.

    The above is what I mean when I say that MS should look to develop solutions on Windows, that go beyond solutions found on the HTML platform. Let the Online division be taken over by Windows proponents, and let them do new and exciting things (lead by designers / user experience guys), which don't merely clone what other companies are doing with HTML. HTML should be considered by MS' online division to be so yesterday!
    P. Douglas
    • Azure Data Marketplace

      @P. Douglas Have you seen Azure Marketplace? https://datamarket.azure.com/
      pnewhook
      • Thanks!

        @pnewhook,

        Thanks for the info. I think this info though should at least be accessible from the Help menu in Visual Studio. Also for those developing WP7 apps, I believe the App Hub should also be accessible from the VS Help menu.
        P. Douglas
      • RE: Microsoft: 400 million Windows 7 and 100 million Office 2010 licenses sold (and more partner conference stats)

        @pnewhook All those info avaialble on microsoft site ! http://www.ommrudraksha.com/products/111-2-mukhi-rudraksha-bead.aspx
        rudraksha1
  • RE: Microsoft: 400 million Windows 7 and 100 million Office 2010 licenses sold (and more partner conference stats)

    Wow impressive numbers. Lets dig a little bit:
    76% of servers "sold with an installed OS" were Windows, the roughly 50% of servers sold bare bones, well we don't know what OS is on them.
    And if MS only makes a couple hundred bucks (1/8th) on the thousands my employer sends them every month, they must have some unreal cost control issues.
    anothercanuck
    • Same old, same old

      The numbers are impressive, however they continue to tell exactly the same story: Windows and Office. Slash the R&D budget and return the money to shareholders.

      Windows server @ 76% of preinstalled is a little disappointing for that market (OEM license, low volume). I'd have expected it to be much higher.
      Richard Flude
      • Yes, the numbers are extremely impressive

        @Richard Flude
        Microsoft deserves congratulations for being so successful.
        toddybottom
      • No you didn't. You expected it to be much worse

        @Richard Flude
        You actually sound disappointed.
        Congratulations are in order for MS.
        William Pharaoh
      • RE: Microsoft: 400 million Windows 7 and 100 million Office 2010 licenses sold (and more partner conference stats)

        @Richard Flude ... As I just told anothercanuck, you underestimate the fact that it's 76% of servers sold with an OS, and that at least a percentage of the servers sold without an OS are running Windows if you consider that many of them are officially running VMware as a host OS and running virtualized copies of Windows licensed through alternate licensing means.
        GoodThings2Life
    • RE: Microsoft: 400 million Windows 7 and 100 million Office 2010 licenses sold (and more partner conference stats)

      @anothercanuck Dont be jealous just because Apple has NADA results on there OS system LOL Windows Rules!!!!
      ipadsucks
      • RE: Microsoft: 400 million Windows 7 and 100 million Office 2010 licenses sold (and more partner conference stats)

        @ipadsucks Miss the point much? MS is purposely misleading their partners with self-serving numbers. What does that say about what MS thinks of its partners? MS apparently thinks its partners are stupid enough to swallow whatever MS dishes up. And, apparently, most of them seem to be.
        anothercanuck
      • RE: Microsoft: 400 million Windows 7 and 100 million Office 2010 licenses sold (and more partner conference stats)

        @ipadsucks Yep! Just like you to hijack a good article and turn it into a flame war. Hopefully you're not allowed to breed.....
        T-Wrench
    • RE: Microsoft: 400 million Windows 7 and 100 million Office 2010 licenses sold (and more partner conference stats)

      @anothercanuck ... You've got the wrong picture here.

      First of all, the "bare bone" servers could either be Linux, Windows Server Volume License, VMware, or any combination, so while we don't know with certainty the exact number, you can assume that many are running alternatively-licensed copies of Windows. I know I buy my servers with no OS and use my volume licensing options, as an example.

      Second, you didn't read the 8.70 figure right. Microsoft makes $1 for every $8.70 their partners make, meaning it's profitable to partner with Microsoft, and Microsoft software is less expensive than you want to believe (especially when getting into proper volume licensing programs).
      GoodThings2Life
      • RE: Microsoft: 400 million Windows 7 and 100 million Office 2010 licenses sold (and more partner conference stats)

        @GoodThings2Life Your first point is absolutely correct, so even if half the bares are Windows, that makes 76% of 50% of servers, plus 50% of the other 1/2 of the servers, for a total of 50% of servers, so why is MS misleading partners with the 76% number?

        Second point, So you're saying that $8.70 is divided amongst all MS partners? How many partners? 10K, 50K, more? $8.70 doesn't go far when divided by those numbers.
        Of course, in reality, the standard 80/20 rule applies.
        anothercanuck
  • Not good numbers

    approx 1.4bn people online (not counting full enterprise footprints) thats 400/1.4bn ... still some low numbers. Silverlight had that in under ~2 years as a plugin and that was free?..
    mossyblog
    • Not sure about your sources or logic....

      @mossyblog 1.4 billion out of a total of around 7 for the whole planet?
      I suspect that most of those are on cell phones, not computers, i.e. if you're talking about "people online" as opposed to computers. Between most of China, India, the rest of lower Asia, New Guinea region, most of South America and most of Africa, I would guess at leat 5 billion live in underdeveloped regions that barely have toilets, never mind electrical service and computers.

      Windows 7 has been around a couple of years, Office 2010 around one year. 400/100 million seems like a great figure to me, especially when you consider that the pricetag is around $55-480/$72-560 for the various licenses of Windows and Office.
      And honestly, I don't understand the connection to silverlight. It's a free plugin. As in... free...and...plugin. You might as well compare MS office to facebook. You know, one is used to do work, and the other is used to waste time. They both run on computers, but that's pretty much where the similarities end. Your comparison goes a little beyond comparing apples and oranges. It's more like apples and mushrooms. You could have picked so many more suitable things... like maybe Linux servers, or linux desktops, or...free office suites??
      rock06r
      • A free plug-in that works on XP, Vista, and Windows 7

        @rock06r
        so how that relates to Windows 7 sales, I'm in agreement, not seeing the relation.
        William Pharaoh
  • 400 million includes all new PCs bought.

    It's not as if PC buyers had a choice.
    Anyway, Microsoft today equates to Office and Windows with little innovation or revenue to show in any other division. Do they really need those tens of thousands of programmers to produce Windows and Office?
    kraterz
    • RE: Microsoft: 400 million Windows 7 and 100 million Office 2010 licenses sold (and more partner conference stats)

      @kraterz

      They do have a choice. Nobody forces consumers to buy PCs. But since Linux is a non starter with consumers, what other options do they have?
      The one and only, Cylon Centurion
      • RE: Microsoft: 400 million Windows 7 and 100 million Office 2010 licenses s

        @Cylon Centurion
        So not true...I was shopping for a possible system replacement at several large electronic store chains, and when I asked about any other OS besides Windows, I was told that only Windows was allowed to be sold with a PC.

        So customers have NO option at all. So these numbers are very bad based on the numbers of systems out there. It's easy to sell millions of licenses when you can't get anything else. I wonder how many of these are really sold, not just sitting in the channel?
        linux for me