Microsoft launches first preview build of IE 10

Microsoft launches first preview build of IE 10

Summary: Just like it did a year ago, Microsoft is using its Mix designer/developer show in Las Vegas this week to launch the first preview build of the next version of Internet Explorer (IE), IE 10.

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TOPICS: Browser, Microsoft
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Just like it did a year ago, Microsoft is using its Mix designer/developer show in Las Vegas this week to launch the first preview build of the next version of Internet Explorer (IE).

On April 12, Microsoft made available a developer preview of IE 10. It is available on the IE Test Drive site. Microsoft officials said to expect the company to offer new builds every 12 weeks. (With IE 9, it was every eight weeks.)

IE 10 will build on the HTML5 and accelerated hardware graphics capabilities that Microsoft built into IE 9. It also will include support for additional standards, like CSS3 Gradients on background images and CSS3 Flexible Box Layout, officials said.

(click on the image above to enlarge)

IE 10 is expected by many Microsoft watchers to be the IE build that Microsoft will include in Windows 8 when it ships, most likely in 2012.

It took Microsoft about a year to move from the first developer preview to the final release-to-Web build of IE 9.

One more thing: The Professional Developers Conference will be in Anaheim, Calif., from September 13 to 16, officials said today.

Topics: Browser, Microsoft

About

Mary Jo has covered the tech industry for 30 years for a variety of publications and Web sites, and is a frequent guest on radio, TV and podcasts, speaking about all things Microsoft-related. She is the author of Microsoft 2.0: How Microsoft plans to stay relevant in the post-Gates era (John Wiley & Sons, 2008).

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64 comments
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  • Loving the execution IE Team

    They are definitely back in the game. I think this is definitely part where you see the benefits of competition and paranoia. The stupid complacency days are gone and that fiasco tying a browser to an operating system release. Microsoft, never make such dumb mistakes again. (Gawd, what were they thinking back in 2003 - 2004)?
    Mr. Dee
    • RE: Microsoft launches first preview build of IE 10

      @Mr. Dee

      I agree to a certain degree, yes they are back in the game. The only drawback it still have it the lack of other OS compatibility (Mac, Linux). Still we will have to wait and see how secure is the browser upgrades.
      reyonlines
      • RE: Microsoft launches first preview build of IE 10

        @reyonlines who cares about those other two OS. I ike OSX (not so much Linux anymore) but have you seen their marketshares? Win 7, Vista, XP all have greater individual shares than OSX. Vista!! There is a slight downwards trend of OSX also.

        If anything, there should be an IE10 for Android.
        frankwick
      • RE: Microsoft launches first preview build of IE 10

        @frankwick
        Now that is not a bad idea! :D
        rhonin
      • I agree about supporting OS X again not Linux though

        @reyonlines I believe Microsoft should indeed OS X support again just to make the browser more interoperable like it use to be, its gonna be extra work load but I believe it will bring more brand recognition that was lost when they discontinued support. As for Linux? Not worth, with a market share of 0.7% it will be waste of development work and strategic dead end considering anybody using Linux is most likely Anti-Microsoft.
        Mr. Dee
      • RE: Microsoft launches first preview build of IE 10

        @Mr. Dee <br>A lie repeated many times is still not a truth. According to Balmer Linux has >5% market share. And this was before Brazil made the huge deployment decision of Linux in the world (356,800 contracted, projected to go to 1.8 M).<br>But you are correct- most Linux users would not use MS. Unless MS changes its attitude completely and provides a superior product which is highly unlikely.
        kirovs@...
      • kirovs, MS makes the superior product alreay

        @reyonlines
        its just a lot of Linux users like to tinker with their OS so they'll stick with Linux.
        Will Farrell
      • It's all about Market Share?

        @reyonlines ... Right frankwick, I think I'll ditch my Subaru and get a Toyota, because have you seen Subaru's market share?

        No way am I going to stand out from the crowd. I want to do what everyone else is doing.

        Life is all about market share, not profits or doing what you want, or being an individual.
        HollywoodDog
      • RE: Microsoft launches first preview build of IE 10

        @HollywoodDog, I'm not trying to convince anyone to give up their preferred OS. Where did I say that?? I'm just stating there shouldn't be IE10 for OSX or Linux.
        frankwick
      • RE: Microsoft launches first preview build of IE 10

        @Will Farrell
        Dear Will,
        I see
        1. You take your wishes for reality (IE being superior)
        2. Not understanding logical operators
        kirovs@...
    • RE: Microsoft launches first preview build of IE 10

      @Mr. Dee They were thinking we have a monopoly and customers will do what we want.
      INGOTIAN
    • RE: Microsoft launches first preview build of IE 10

      @Mr. Dee <br>One thing we have to remember why IE has not been proactively developed after IE6. Thanks to EU and DOJ, they screwed and halted the complete IE cycle. And Microsoft has been under constant watch by DOJ employed personal and luckily they are coming out of it shortly. And now the competition have to really should be afraid of Microsoft. They have taken the advantage of last decade because of this. And this shows Microsoft is back in the game and Game starts.
      Ram U
      • DOJ had nothing to do with IE out of cycle development

        @Rama.NET What the DOJ didn't like was the fact that Microsoft was bundling the browser with Windows giving the user no incentive to try other alternatives. We already know, most users just use whatever comes with the OS. Another part of the DOJ investigation was the other bundled apps and the ability to set alternative defaults for Windows bundled apps like Media Player, Web Browser and Email. This didn't prevent the IE Team from releasing out of cycle releases, but the idea of tying IE releases to Windows backfired when Longhorn turned out to be too ambitious. Microsoft wanted IE 7, Office 12 to be Longhorn specific releases with good reason because of the WinFS technology that was going to be the heart of these upgrades, but that turned out to be too much and brought the whole house down.
        Mr. Dee
      • RE: Microsoft launches first preview build of IE 10

        [i]@Rama.NET What the DOJ didn't like was the fact that Microsoft was bundling the browser with Windows giving the user no incentive to try other alternatives. We already know, most users just use whatever comes with the OS.[/i]

        Bingo! Well finally there's a shill who admits the obvious.

        [i]Another part of the DOJ investigation was the other bundled apps and the ability to set alternative defaults for Windows bundled apps like Media Player, Web Browser and Email.[/i]

        Yeah and if it hadn't been for the DOJ, we'd all be using WMA filled with Hollywood DRM and nothing else.

        [i]This didn't prevent the IE Team from releasing out of cycle releases, but the idea of tying IE releases to Windows backfired when Longhorn turned out to be too ambitious. Microsoft wanted IE 7, Office 12 to be Longhorn specific releases with good reason because of the WinFS technology that was going to be the heart of these upgrades, but that turned out to be too much and brought the whole house down.[/i]

        Yes and Longhorn is why XP is still king and around a lot longer than it should be. Long live XP! The double-edged sword M$ deserved.

        lol...
        LTV10
      • Bundling the browser with the OS.

        @Rama.NET ...Upgrades to the original IE can be un-installed, but the original OS IE cannot be uninstalled.<br><br>It's purpose it to be permanent, so even if other browsers were installed, it would still be there. IE is the Windows Explorer, so how convoluted is that? What does that kind of entanglement do for stability and security?<br><br>Microsoft only exists in it's own proprietary world. Unfortunately, with other alternatives gaining popularity, the only thing they have left is their mandatory installation on OEM computers. And that is even changing with HP. I'm using a dual core HP AMD that was purchased new and did not come with an OS.<br><br>The scariest thing about Android is that it is teaching common users the advantages of Linux, both in operation and security.
        Joe.Smetona
    • It wasn't complacency.

      @ Mr. Dee

      It wasn't complacency: Microsoft actually disbanded the IE development team altogether. They were trying to move the software industry away from web browsers and web apps, and towards .NET apps. It didn't work.

      Microsoft's strategy to replace the web failed partly because of regulatory constraints, but also because Google used (and still use) what are essentially subsidies to keep the Mozilla zombie (the reanimated corpse of Netscape) going. Developing web browsers has never been a viable business (NCSA Mosaic was free), but it was (and is) in Google's interests too subsidise browsers tied to their dominant search services.

      For OS developers like Microsoft and Apple, a browser is just an essential part of the operating environment, like a file browser or a text editor. However, since it's also used to run web apps, if they lose control of the browser on their platforms, they lose a lot of control over the platform itself. Microsoft realised that in the 90s, but crossed the anti-competitive line, and paid the price. Partly as a result, they were overly cautious with IE in the 00s.
      WilErz
      • RE: Microsoft launches first preview build of IE 10

        @WilErz
        <i>also because Google used (and still use) what are essentially subsidies to keep the Mozilla zombie (the reanimated corpse of Netscape) going.</i>
        The world should all be praising Google for that. Otherwise Microsoft?s scheme to wrest control of the Internet may have succeeded. If Microsoft had managed to gain control of the Internet, You could pretty much forget out Objective comments, as they would be under the scrutiny of Microsoft. Any review that was not authorized would be banned. In order to access the internet, would be limited to Windows, and Windows only. Let?s be real here for a second. If Microsoft controls anything, two things happen.

        1) Stagnation: no progress, or innovation. See IE 6, as an example of this.

        2) Higher than normal prices: There would be a new tax (imposed by Microsoft) and that fee would never go down. I believe this would happen if any one company controlled the Internet (so I am not just bashing Microsoft).
        Rick_K
      • Paranoia

        @ Rick_K

        In responding to your inane scenario (assuming you're serious), the first thing to point out is that the CLI, which forms the basis of .NET, is an open standard. There are non-Microsoft implementations that run on non-Microsoft OSes, most notably Mono, and if the proprietary WPF presentation layer had caught on, it would have been cloned. Indeed, there's already a Mono-based clone of the WPF subset used in Silverlight, called Moonlight. Replacing web apps with .NET apps wouldn't have given Microsoft 'control' of the internet, or even control of web/internet apps on the PC.

        Secondly, even if Microsoft had somehow achieved control of internet apps on the PC, they've never come close to being as controlling as Apple, and not even Apple regulate the flow of opinion on the platforms they control (e.g. iOS). Microsoft's privacy record, though not particularly good, also looks brilliant next to Google's utterly abysmal one. Even James Gosling (the creator of Java) recently concluded that, amongst Google, Oracle and Microsoft, Microsoft have probably got the moral high ground.

        Your two last points are barely worth responding to, but the reality is that Microsoft's products in markets where they're dominant, e.g. Windows and Office, aren't in the least bit stagnant. One reason for this is that competition from previous versions is quite strong (a common situation with durable goods). Another is that the markets are very profitable, so are attractive to potential competitors. IE6 was a special case of a quasi-product that was essentially cancelled after it had generated huge legal headaches for Microsoft. Suggesting that it generalises to actual products is absurd. Regarding prices, Windows was actually cheaper when Microsoft had more control over pricing, because of substantial discounts to vendors who invested development and marketing resources in the Windows ecosystem. By forcing uniform pricing, competition authorities have actually driven average prices up.

        Overall, Google should be neither applauded nor condemned for subsidising Mozilla. They simply did what was in the interests of their shareholders: subsidising an open source web browser to defend web apps (where Google are strong) against a potential alternative of .NET apps (where Google would be weak), with the ultimate objective of protecting their dominant position in web advertising. They released Android for essentially the same reason, only Android's target is iOS apps rather than .NET apps, and the market is mobile advertising rather than web advertising.
        WilErz
  • RE: Microsoft launches first preview build of IE 10

    To heck with IE 10. They need to fix IE 9 first. 64 bit verson sucks,crashes all the time.
    rdw551
    • RE: Microsoft launches first preview build of IE 10

      @rdw551
      If you are up to date on ie9, you know what is up with the 64-bit version. With the current lack of good usable add-ons for 64-bit, MS is right in leaving as is and focusing on ie10.

      When is the last time you used 64-bit ie?
      If you use it frequently, why? 32-bit is better and faster.

      ;)
      rhonin