Microsoft, NSF team to provide research in the cloud

Microsoft, NSF team to provide research in the cloud

Summary: Microsoft and the National Science Foundation announced on February 4 that they are teaming to provide NSF-selected researchers with free cloud computing resources built around Microsoft's Windows Azure public-cloud operating system.

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Microsoft and the National Science Foundation announced on February 4 that they are teaming to provide NSF-selected researchers with free cloud computing resources built around Microsoft's Windows Azure public-cloud operating system.

Under the terms of the new program, the NSF chooses individual researchers and research groups who will get free access to Microsoft's cloud-computing resources for three years. The NSF is charged with awarding and managing the projects. More details for those interested in applying are available on the NSF's Web site.

The winners get free Azure compute/storage time, access to Microsoft support to help them figure out how to integrate Microsoft's cloud technology into their research. Microsoft also will provide the winners with "a set of common tools, applications and data collections that can be shared with the broad academic community, and also provide its expertise in research, science and cloud computing," according to the company.

Topics: CXO, Cloud, Hardware, Microsoft, Virtualization

About

Mary Jo has covered the tech industry for 30 years for a variety of publications and Web sites, and is a frequent guest on radio, TV and podcasts, speaking about all things Microsoft-related. She is the author of Microsoft 2.0: How Microsoft plans to stay relevant in the post-Gates era (John Wiley & Sons, 2008).

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6 comments
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  • thanks, but no thanks!

    why would a scientist use mind numbing 'free' products from M$?
    FOSS is so much better.
    Linux Geek
    • Money

      It costs money to build out your own computation cluster or to use somebody elses.

      ----- Rom
      RomW
  • RE: Microsoft, NSF team to provide research in the cloud

    Azure and VCSY's patent 6826744.(By Portuno)

    You owe it to yourself to compare them. Microsoft has a license to use 6826744. Check out what they will be able to do with it.

    Azure:
    http://www.microsoft.com/azure/default.mspx
    http://www.microsoft.com/azure/services.mspx
    http://www.microsoft.com/azure/whatisazure.mspx
    http://www.microsoft.com/azure/whyuseazure.mspx
    http://www.microsoft.com/azure/softwareplusservices.mspx

    That should help you figure out how much of Microsoft's future is riding on it.

    Now, look what Microsoft will use in Azure.

    6826744:
    http://patft.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-Parser?Sect1=PTO1&Sect2=HITOFF&d=PALL&p=1&u=/netahtml/PTO/srchnum.
    htm&r=1&f=G&l=50&s1=6,826,744.PN.&OS=PN/6,826,744&RS=PN/6,826,744

    And, if anyone is upset with me posting this, you can thank Al for supplying the motivation. Thanks Al.


    http://messages.finance.yahoo.com/Stocks_%28A_to_Z%29/Stocks_V/threadview?m=tm&bn=33693&tid=16596&mid=16596&tof=1&frt=2
    no secrets
  • RE: Microsoft, NSF team to provide research in the cloud

    How did Microsoft do it?

    http://industry.bnet.com/technology/10003807/sharepoint-is-microsofts-real-window-of-opportunity/

    "What Microsoft has succeeded in doing is moving the center of productivity and collaboration, which had been in the on-premise Office environment, to the Web without breaking those processes that make its applications so powerful to end users. "


    (more at URL)
    -----------------------


    And MSFT did it only after Summer 2008 while they endured two years of disappointment over Vista.

    As we've said for years, VCSY 521 technology enables interconnection between any data body and any other data body with data transaction and transformation across any platform.

    As well, VCSY 744 allows object interoperation and integration with any content, any format and any functionality on any platform.

    The beauty of the approach is to enable legacy code and legacy applications to be modernized to web-capability.

    Now you're beginning to see in public what VCSY longs have talked about for the past 9 nears.


    more at url:
    http://messages.finance.yahoo.com/Stocks_%28A_to_Z%29/Stocks_V/threadview?m=tm&bn=33693&tid=26572&mid=26572&tof=1&frt=2
    no secrets
  • thanks, we're checking into it...

    A number of my users are NSF-funded, some are Windows-centric.
    I've forwarded the link to your article and the NSF link to them.

    Our current Linux cluster would've made the "Top 500" when it was ordered in April 2007, but fell shy by the time it was installed in July 2007.

    ..there are never enough cycles..
    astro_z
  • Microsoft, NSF team to provide research in the cloud

    This is a nice use case for cloud computing. Scientists don't have to be as concerned with acquiring and managing computing infrastructure in order to run massive modeling and computational processes. And Windows Azure (http://azure.com) provides an easy-to-use cloud platform that aligns well to existing programming models and tools, which can help scientists focus more on research.

    ?We?ve entered a new era of science ? one based on data-driven exploration ? and each new generation of computing technology, such as cloud computing, creates unprecedented opportunities for discovery,? said Jeannette M. Wing, assistant director for the NSF Computer and Information Science directorate. ?We are working with Microsoft to provide the academic community a novel cloud computing service with which to experiment and explore, with the grander goal of advancing the frontiers of science and engineering as we tackle societal grand challenges.?
    davidcchou