Microsoft Office 2010 enterprise pricing: You win some, you lose some

Microsoft Office 2010 enterprise pricing: You win some, you lose some

Summary: My ZDNet colleague Ed Bott has posted a list of great suggestions for individuals interested in getting Office 2010 as cheaply as (legally) possible. But what if you're a business user covered by a volume licensing contract? What can you expect, price-wise, with Office 2010?

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Microsoft's launch of Office 2010 and SharePoint 2010 is on May 12, with the main event happening in New York City. Starting that day, business users will be able to get their hands on Microsoft's latest version of its Office client and server products. (Consumers who want Office and/or Office Web Apps still will have to wait until June.)

My ZDNet colleague Ed Bott has posted a list of great suggestions for individuals interested in getting Office 2010 as cheaply as (legally) possible. But what if you're a business user covered by a volume licensing contract? What can you expect, price-wise, with Office 2010?

The researchers over at Directions on Microsoft have done quite a bit of price analysis on this front. They've found that volume licensees should expect to pay the same or higher for Office 2010 than they did for Office 2007. In the cases where the price is higher, Microsoft has added more features, Directions on Microsoft noted.

Directions analyzed Microsoft's latest Office 2010 price sheet for changes. Here's their summary

Office 2010 Professional Plus goes up 4% Office 2010 Standard stays the same

Project 2010 and Project 2010 Pro each go up 10% Project Server 2010 goes up 10% Project Server Client Access License (CAL) remains the same

SharePoint Server 2010 Enterprise CAL goes up 10%; Standard CAL remains the same SharePoint Server 2010 Server license goes up 10% SharePoint Server for Internet Sites Enterprise remains the same Enterprise CAL Suite goes up 2.5%

I asked Microsoft whether the company was holding pricing steady and/or increasing it for its volume license customers and a spokesperson said: "We do not discuss pricing for our enterprise solutions because of the flexibility built into our Volume Licensing (VL) model."

Remember, though: Customers who buy through Microsoft's Open and Select license plans don't typically have a lot of negotiating power. If you're under 750 seats, you probably have even less bargaining power. Plus, if you do manage to negotiate a 5 percent or ten percent discount after the price rises that much, you're still paying the same as last year -- or more, if you also managed to negotiate a comparable discount last year.

"We've found that Microsoft generally appears to be holding the line on Office price -- maybe due to the competition from people like Google Apps, maybe the economy, maybe both. I think everyone would agree that this isn't a good time to be raising prices," said Directions on Microsoft analyst Paul DeGroot.

"So while the price of the Pro Plus suite has gone up, more components have been added and it represents the same discount -- 65% -- from (total of all of the individual components) that Office 2007 Pro Plus does. The deal with Office Standard is actually substantially improved -- more components, same price."

In addition, according to Directions on Microsoft, Microsoft has actually dropped prices on most of the individual components in its Office 2010 suite (Word, Excel, PowerPoint, OneNote, etc.).

Stay tuned for more Office 2010 posts from me this week. I'll also be covering the New York City launch on Wednesday in person. In the interim, let me know if you have any lingering questions about Office 2010/SharePoint 2010 and I'll do my best to get them answered...

Topics: Collaboration, Microsoft, Software

About

Mary Jo has covered the tech industry for 30 years for a variety of publications and Web sites, and is a frequent guest on radio, TV and podcasts, speaking about all things Microsoft-related. She is the author of Microsoft 2.0: How Microsoft plans to stay relevant in the post-Gates era (John Wiley & Sons, 2008).

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27 comments
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  • RE: Microsoft Office 2010 enterprise pricing: You win some, you lose some

    Beware, if you install 64-bit Outlook 2010 and try to sync your Windows Mobile phone over a USB or Bluetooth connection, all your contacts and other synced data on the phone will be deleted without warning.
    JohnMorgan3
    • RE: Microsoft Office 2010 enterprise pricing: You win some, you lose some

      @JFDude

      :( .. Thanks for your info...
      I lost everything from my ppc. Do you think mr.bill will pay for this!
      Almatrodi
  • This begs for another article: Office Web Apps--FREE--is it worth it?

    nt
    Dietrich T. Schmitz,Your Linux Advocate
    • RE: Microsoft Office 2010 enterprise pricing: You win some, you lose some

      @Dietrich T. Schmitz,Your Linux Advocate

      Then go write one.
      Hallowed are the Ori
      • RE: Microsoft Office 2010 enterprise pricing: You win some, you lose some

        @James T. Kirk

        Seriously... Do you REALLY expect Dietrich to write an HONEST evaluation of Office Web apps??? If anything, it'll be the standard hit piece filled with why it sucks (lack of code transparency, it's Microsoft ergo it's evil)... He'll no doubt finagle in a long digression on App Armor and Linux and his usual schtick into the post - even tho it has NOTHING to do with the subject.
        Wolfie2K3
      • RE: RE: Microsoft Office 2010 enterprise pricing: You win some, you lose some

        @Wolfie2K3<br><br>No, but if he's off writing an exhaustive review of "free" web apps, maybe he wouldn't have so much time to come here and pollute Talkback.

        PS: Somebody at ZDNet should be lined up against a wall and shot for what they've done to Talkback.

        I also find it stunning that someone in charge at ZDNet thought THIS was a good idea for a redesign.
        Hallowed are the Ori
  • RE: Microsoft Office 2010 enterprise pricing: You win some, you lose some

    What about the Mac version? does it contain macros like the PC version of Office 2008 does?
    Starman35
    • VBA

      @Starman35

      Yes, they're adding VBA support back in to Mac Office.
      KTLA
  • Also, need to review Open Office price plans

    Also, need to review Open Office price plans
    linux-user
    • More should

      Hard to beat the box price of $0, eh?
      Chris_Clay
      • No so hard to beat $0.

        Maybe $0 is good for a small environment or home use, but it's very different from an enterprise. For example, how Openoffice integrates with ERP's like SAP? (www.duet.com). You can manage Office with AD Group Policy for 100s or 1000s of users. Is that possible with OO? What's the email client for OO? Or how compares the OO offering vs Visio or Onenote? How's the integration between OO Alfresco vs Office Sharepoint? Or OO Asterisk vs Office OCS?
        That's a small example on why MSO still with so large market share in the enterprise, even when Openoffice is $0.
        dvm
    • Oracle Open Office equivilant price comparison

      It looks like their Enterprise ""Pro" equvilant" is $90 per user, so cheaper than MS Office, but still sognificant once you add in the support (as you get with MS Office). <br><br><a href="https://shop.oracle.com/pls/ostore/product?p1=oracleoffice&sc=ocom_openoffice" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">https://shop.oracle.com/pls/ostore/product?p1=oracleoffice&sc=ocom_openoffice</a>
      KTLA
    • RE: Microsoft Office 2010 enterprise pricing: You win some, you lose some

      @linux-user

      It is hard to beat Free, but if the features in the Free version do not meet the needs of the individual or organization then what good is it? The part that most Free Software advocates do not get is that many people want to use Office or need it for the features it offers. Free does not automatically make it better.
      bobiroc
  • Google Docs gets more appealing every day

    nt
    wraith404
  • Why are costs going up?

    They want to drive down wages, but with costs going up people won't be able to buy.
    HypnoToad72
    • RE: Microsoft Office 2010 enterprise pricing: You win some, you lose some

      @HypnoToad72
      When I was still an employee rather than a retiree we had a term for that.
      WTMWB
      What The Market Will Bear.
      cbmjb
  • RE: Microsoft Office 2010 enterprise pricing: You win some, you lose some

    With Ubuntu 10.04 for free, people would have to be nuts to pay for Windows/Office. I use Microsoft on a couple of machines because I get it for free, and have legacy apps that run on them. Even so I have migrated my other systems to Linux. As Linux gets easier to install, maintain and use, I think there will come a point where people and businesses will suddenly realize that you cannot argue with paying zero for a quality product.
    earinze
    • Whatever floats YOUR boat...

      @earinze

      Well... If it works for YOU, then go for it. But don't assume that everyone else has the same limited needs as yourself and your office staff. Some of us have more complex needs that OOo just doesn't handle very well or at all.
      Wolfie2K3
      • RE: Microsoft Office 2010 enterprise pricing: You win some, you lose some

        @Wolfie2K3

        Why is that such a hard concept for some people? They think because a Free Linux Version and Some Free application meets their needs that it should be good enough for everybody. I mean just because a simple 4 door sedan works for you it doesn't mean the other person does not need/want that truck, SUV, or performance car. If one product worked for everybody then there wouldn't be a need for a choice and despite what some Anti-Microsoft people think people actually do choose and prefer Windows and MS Office over other paid or free software.
        bobiroc
  • Seriously, why upgrade? There isn't much difference between 07 & 10

    The keeping up with the Jones attitude is brain dead. Most people use a fraction of the features on Word or Excel and those features haven't changed for years. Perhaps there are significant reasons to upgrade if you are still using Office XP but I can't imagine that there is anything earthshaking enough to upgrade from 2007 - 2010 unless you needed additional liceses and 2010 was the only new license available to you.
    balsover