Where in the world are Microsoft's datacenters?

Where in the world are Microsoft's datacenters?

Summary: While Microsoft does share some information about what's inside these datacenters, the company seldom provides an overview of its grand datacenter plan. That's why I was happy to get from one of my sources this slide (from November 2009), which shows where Microsoft has built and is building its Microsoft Online datacenters across the globe.

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Microsoft is building out its datacenters and datacenter infrastructure at a rapid clip, as part of the company's stated mission to introduce a cloud version and/or cloud components of all of its existing software products.

While Microsoft does share some information about what's inside these datacenters, the company seldom provides an overview of its grand datacenter plan. That's why I was happy to get from one of my sources this slide (from November 2009), which shows where Microsoft has built and is building its Microsoft Online datacenters across the globe.

(Click on the slide below to enlarge.)

Microsoft's plan is to pair up datacenters for each geographic region, with one datacenter being designated as primary and the other, secondary, for disaster-recovery purposes. Microsoft was evaluating whether to put a primary datacenter in Brazil for the South American market, backed up by a North American datacenter.

According to this slide, Microsoft will be adding support for customers in Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Czech Republic, Greece, Hungary, Israel, Mexico, Poland, Puerto Rico, Romania, Hong Kong, South Korea and Taiwan in the coming months.

Microsoft Online -- or MS Online, as it is labeled at the top of this slide -- is the part of the company that develops and sells Microsoft-hosted offerings like the Business Productivity Online Suite (BPOS); the individual BPOS services (SharePoint Online, Exchange Online, Office Communications Online and Live Meeting); Dynamics CRM Online; and forthcoming new services, like the BPOS-Lite product I wrote about earlier this year.

Update: Looks like things may have changed in terms of Microsoft's plans, since they created this slide in November 2009. Here's a statement from Kevin Timmons, general manager of Datacenter Operations:

“This is an outdated ‘vision’ slide which does not accurately reflect our existing or future datacenter plans. Datacenters represent a long-term business approach to meet future cloud services demands of customers. We have to consider multiple proposals from across our business groups to ensure we are making thoughtful, measured investments that are in line with our long-term business approach to meet future demand by pre-investing in a way that allows us to support future capacity incrementally in a cost-efficient manner.”

I'd interpret this as "don't expect this stuff to happen in April." It will be interesting to see how Microsoft's actual plans do compare to this slide, once they make the actual announcements (if they do).

Topics: Microsoft, Data Centers, Hardware, Storage

About

Mary Jo has covered the tech industry for 30 years for a variety of publications and Web sites, and is a frequent guest on radio, TV and podcasts, speaking about all things Microsoft-related. She is the author of Microsoft 2.0: How Microsoft plans to stay relevant in the post-Gates era (John Wiley & Sons, 2008).

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14 comments
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  • Why is it so hard for some people to spell COLOMBIA, not COLUMBIA??? Jeeez

    Subject says it all, it is just a matter of laziness (and lack of general culture), as even the graph shown has the name spelled correctly...
    Polluxgold
    • Why is it so hard for people to say colombia without sounding like columbia

      Maybe its the spanish accent that screws us up?
      Been_Done_Before
    • fixed my mistake

      Sorry for my lazyness and lack of general culture. It is all fixed now. MJ
      Mary Jo Foley
    • Same reason it's so hard to spell "laziness". (NT)

      NT
      clfitz
  • RE: Where in the world are Microsoft's datacenters?

    Because people are phonetic thinkers.
    bajan5026@...
    • Is that why people write "then" when they mean "than"? (nt)

      n/t
      I am Gorby
  • Where are trehy building in the US.

    Could not care less about other countries.
    No_Ax_to_Grind
    • You should!!!

      Given that yours owes some of them so much money.
      Great Kahuna
      • We dont owe them money.. they own treasury notes.

        theres a difference.

        People just describe it as us owing them money.
        Been_Done_Before
  • I went to a MS presentation last month and saw a much more detailed graphic

    Wish i had the presentation. The people who presented were Champion solutions of south florida. Maybe contact them for a better image?
    Been_Done_Before
  • Failover v Share Everything

    So a legacy software company is now doing failover datacentres. Digital was doing, and is still doing share everything disaster tolerant clusters in the mid 1980's. Microsoft, yesterday's technology for todays losers
    thedavidmckenzie
    • They have 3 or more copies in each datacenter (I think)

      From what I gather, there is a ring of servers that host your data in a particular datacenter... and there are 3 or more copies inside that particular datacenter. Maybe the failover would be for a catastrophic even in one of the datacenters... it would be very difficult to have on-line data in different datacenters and synchronize them, what with the latencies; or even route the request and decide to which one to go...
      Roque Mocan
      • VMSclusters do just this

        But this is exactly what VMScluster did 20 years ago and still do. Online synchronous copies of data up to 500km apart.

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/VMScluster
        thedavidmckenzie
    • i don't...

      ...like their chances either:

      "...So a legacy software company is now doing failover datacentres..."

      I'm going to go out on a limb and predict (should MS actually go ahead with this new cloud-based, multi-national deployment MF is talking up) a *best case* scenario would be text-book 99.9% uptime - which as you will know (or not) is *nowhere near* failover.

      ..I'm not going to hold my breath over them achieving 99.9% either.

      This is the proverbial blindfold dive into unfamiliar, cold, deep, murky waters for MS.

      Good luck .. they're gonna need all of it.
      thx-1138_