Windows 7 Service Pack 1: What's inside

Windows 7 Service Pack 1: What's inside

Summary: Leakers seem to have gotten their hands on what may be the final Windows 7 Service Pack 1/Windows Server 2008 R2 SP1 builds. It seems like a good time to revisit what will be in the first SP update for Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2.

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Leakers seem to have gotten their hands on what may be the final Windows 7 Service Pack 1/Windows Server 2008 R2 SP1 builds.

(I had heard rumors that Microsoft had put the finishing touches on SP1 in December, but don't know for sure whether that is true.)

Microsoft officials are not saying whether the latest leaked version is the "real" SP1 release-to-manufacturing version. As usual, the advice to customers is to wait for the official Microsoft-provided SP1 before deploying to avoid potential malware and security risks.

Unlike previous first service packs of Windows -- which were an absolute must-have for many business users before they'd even think about deploying the latest Windows variant -- the coming SP1 feels a bit anti-climactic. (At least on the client side.)

Microsoft officials have said not to expect any new features in Windows 7 SP1. (There was a Microsoft blog post last year that acknowledged there would be some "feature enhancements" in SP1 around federation services, audio devices and printing.) They've also said to expect a couple of new virtualization updates in the server version of SP1, specifically RemoteFX and a dynamic-memory adjustor for Hyper-V.

RemoteFX is a new graphics acceleration platform that is based on desktop-remoting technology that Microsoft obtained in 2008 when it acquired VDI vendor Calista Technologies. The new Hyper-V feature in SP1 will dynamically adjust memory of a guest virtual machine on demand.

For months, Microsoft execs have been telling business users there is no need to wait for SP1 to begin their Windows 7 deployment processes. Quite a few have heeded this call, with Forrester Research estimating that 10 percent of business PCs in North America and Europe already were running Windows 7 as of last fall. Forrester said at that time that 90 percent of those users it surveyed eventually planned to move to Windows 7.

I've asked Microsoft officials when MSDN, TechNet, volume and other customers should expect the final SP1 build and was told the company had nothing more to share at this time.

Topics: Microsoft, Operating Systems, Software, Windows

About

Mary Jo has covered the tech industry for 30 years for a variety of publications and Web sites, and is a frequent guest on radio, TV and podcasts, speaking about all things Microsoft-related. She is the author of Microsoft 2.0: How Microsoft plans to stay relevant in the post-Gates era (John Wiley & Sons, 2008).

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142 comments
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  • RE: Windows 7 Service Pack 1: What's inside

    But will SP1 fix the darn internet connection drop out problem plaguing many Win7 users (a Vista legacy bug)?
    Kuby
    • RE: Windows 7 Service Pack 1: What's inside

      Kuby, do you have a MS forum thread on that? I've never heard of it.
      rseiler
      • RE: Windows 7 Service Pack 1: What's inside

        @rseiler I agree with you...never heard of it...nor seen it with "many users" as he describes...and I do a LOT of tech support.
        jcpt928
      • Same here

        @rseiler. 30 machines at work, never had an issue like that at all.
        John Zern
      • Here's a problem that happens all the time.

        I haven't seen that, but there's always the idiotic new Start button to bitch about.

        GJ, Microsoft. Make it impossible to organize your applications into groups. RETARDED.

        XP:
        http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3332/3513561131_8ffd4765bd_d.jpg

        Windows 7:
        http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3365/3508263035_26f41a6648.jpg
        dgurney
      • Start Menu editing not difficult...

        @dgurney <br>"GJ, Microsoft. Make it impossible to organize your applications into groups. "<br><br>No; they just made it more difficult for the novice user, whilst for the power-user, it is as easy as ever.<br><br>Make sure Hidden Folder and Sys Folders are visible and navigate to:<br><b>C:\ProgramData\Start Menu\Programs</b><br><br>Edit from there <img border="0" src="http://www.cnet.com/i/mb/emoticons/happy.gif" alt="happy"><br><br>Likely a call was made to leave editing start menu layouts was not for the novice after all!
        kaninelupus
    • RE: Windows 7 Service Pack 1: What's inside

      @Kuby

      I see no evidence of that on any system I am responsible for.
      alsw
    • RE: Windows 7 Service Pack 1: What's inside

      @Kuby
      never happened to me on Windows 7
      shellcodes_coder
    • RE: Windows 7 Service Pack 1: What's inside

      @Kuby try using OpenDNS or reinstalling/updating your drivers.

      I have not had any problems with vista or 7.
      Roubos
    • RE: Windows 7 Service Pack 1: What's inside

      @Kuby
      I wouldn't say it's plaguing many people, but there appears to be affecting a few users.
      Also, it appears to be a driver (hardware, or other software) issue and not directly a Windows 7 problem.
      faxmonkey
      • RE: Windows 7 Service Pack 1: What's inside

        @faxmonkey

        That is more likely the issue. A certain Brand/Model of NIC with faulty drivers/hardware. For example my brother has a custom built computer with a NVidia NIC that will not connect at gigabit speed under Windows 7. Using the same cable that is plugged into the same port on the same router on another computer it connects at a gigabit just fine. It connected at a gigabit under Windows Vista and connects at a gigabit when launching a boot CD using Linux so it is not a hardware problem but a driver problem from NVidia.
        bobiroc
      • Thank you!

        @bobiroc

        Thank you for the thorough method review of your testing. Much appreciated.
        Isocrates
    • RE: Windows 7 Service Pack 1: What's inside

      @Kuby <br>I have never heard of it. I and none of my clients have seen it. Are you sure you do not work for Apple?
      In fact the ONLY net slowdow issues I have ever seen on Win 7 were imediatly fixed when we removed the Apple Bonjour service that some had installed when they tried to use iTunes. Bonjour removed,,, issue fixed. It was NOT a WIn 7 issue.
      Baer
      • RE: Windows 7 Service Pack 1: What's inside

        @Baer Like you I have never heard of this and I build custom systems. An as far as Baer's statement I use nothing but Boards and cards used for network that have Nvidia chips. Also I'm not aware of any Nic ether on-board of cards. But the point being this is the first i have heard of Win7 dropping internet connection
        Par-Pro
      • RE: Windows 7 Service Pack 1: What's inside

        @Baer

        Off topic
        Jen8
    • RE: Windows 7 Service Pack 1: What's inside

      @Kuby

      Love how many people associate a problem that may be happening to them and a handful of others is a global Windows Bug. Never mind the millions of other people using the Same version of Windows without that problem. Just because the issue with your computer and/or your internet are affecting the way Windows performs it does not mean it is a Windows problem.

      I have never heard of this as an issue and the nearly 1000 computers I have running Win7 in my organization and the literally 100's of other Windows 7 computers between friends, family, and side job clients have never ever experienced anything similar should show that this is not a global bug. Maybe an issue with a certain brand/model NIC card or something but not a Windows Problem. Like the responders below I too would like to see concrete evidence of this so called "bug"
      bobiroc
      • The problem with your statement

        @bobiroc
        >>>Just because the issue with your computer and/or your internet are affecting the way Windows performs it does not mean it is a Windows problem.<<<

        is that problems encountered in Windows, such as dropping internet connection, are often solved by running a live Linux distro. I have gone 'round and 'round with my ISP and Microsoft on this. My ISP says 'not our problem' and Microsoft says the same. Yet, going on the internet with a live distro yields no problems.
        richdave
      • RE: Windows 7 Service Pack 1: What's inside

        @richdave

        [i]"is that problems encountered in Windows, such as dropping internet connection, are often solved by running a live Linux distro. I have gone 'round and 'round with my ISP and Microsoft on this. My ISP says 'not our problem' and Microsoft says the same. Yet, going on the internet with a live distro yields no problems."[/i]

        Doesn't change the fact that for every 1 computer that may exhibit this problem or something similar there are 100's of thousands that do not and many of them could even be running the same hardware. Thats the funny thing about software. It could be any number of things causing his or others issues but chances are it is not the fault of the operating system. I would be willing to bet it is a driver problem or maybe even a problem with his router or some piece of software/malware causing his issue.
        bobiroc
      • Well, that would be the reverse of the phenomenon

        @bobiroc
        Where an individual claims that a known, documented problem pluaging a large group of people doesn't exist because it didn't happen to them. ;)
        John Zern
      • Live Linux Distros.

        @richdave ....These (live Linux CD's) are tremendous tools for those in the computer industry. Some computers are so fast, if you insert a USB key, you can emulate a complete system on the fly. It's just as fast or possibly even faster than the installed system. The Linux drivers are amazing, they can almost connect to anything --it makes you wonder why drivers are such a problem with Windows.
        Joe.Smetona