HTC's Teeter shows off how physical feedback can immerse you in a game

HTC's Teeter shows off how physical feedback can immerse you in a game

Summary: I spent a few hours with the HTC Touch Diamond and while I work on my more detailed thoughts, I just had to post about the accelerometer and haptic feedback technology that just blew me away on the device. I am not sure what the technology is behind it and it may be some kind of gyroscope and the regular phone vibration mechanism, but it is very cool. I knew there was some kind of sensor in the device that lets you auto-rotate the display in the Opera Mobile 9.5 web browser, but never heard anything about any type of haptic feedback on the device.

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TOPICS: HTC, Mobility
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I spent a few hours with the HTC Touch Diamond and while I work on my more detailed thoughts, I just had to post about the accelerometer and haptic physical feedback technology that just blew me away on the device. (I don't think it really can be considered haptics because the doesn't respond as you tap the display, but gives you feedback as actions occur.) I am not sure what the technology is behind it and it may be some kind of gyroscope and the regular phone vibration mechanism, but it is very cool. I knew there was some kind of sensor in the device that lets you auto-rotate the display in the Opera Mobile 9.5 web browser, but never heard anything about any type of haptic feedback on the device.

I went to the TouchFLO 3D home screen and then ran my finger over and across the icons to the Programs icon. There are a few program shortcuts preloaded on the Diamond and so I tapped on one that I was unfamiliar with only to discover it was a Labyrinth-type game called Teeter. Teeter starts up and a silver (modeled after a stainless steel ball) ball appears on the display with black openings, walls, and a single green opening. The object is to get the silver ball into the green opening without going into the black openings and disappearing. The thing is you do not use your finger or stylus to move the silver ball, but with the device held level parallel to the ground you tilt the device to move the ball.

The sensors are extremely sensitive and you can even skirt along the edges of the black openings without falling in. It also picks up how much you tilt the device and the ball will accelerate/decelerate depending on your angle.

The real shocker for me though, was what happens when the ball hits a wall/side. You physically feel the hit in the actual area where the ball hits the wall. Plus, the vibration/feedback varies by how far the ball travels before it hits the wall/side. I played the unlocked iPhone version of this game, but the feedback on the Touch Diamond adds a whole new element. My wife is not easily impressed by my devices, but this alone made her say she wanted a Touch Diamond.

I hope that HTC gives developers the tools to take advantage of this capability since I think there could be some fantastic games created to make an immersive experience for players. OK, I am off to see how many levels I can get through on the Touch Diamond.

Topics: HTC, Mobility

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4 comments
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  • Most coOL. Glad you're having fun with it Matt!

    nt
    D T Schmitz
  • Nice to see real innovation in the cell phone market

    It is a breath of fresh air considering what has been passing off as innovation over the last year.
    NonZealot
  • loving the game...

    i jus rediscovered this game today... after abt 2 weeks of playing it in my HTC wildfire... n i m loving it very much... awesome timepass...
    saurjk
    • 3:27

      Another record ! 3:27 seconds ! And the others records are close, 3:29, 3:33 !!! Close to world record, second times !
      lupialbi