Samsung Galaxy Note: Is it a phone or a tablet?

Samsung Galaxy Note: Is it a phone or a tablet?

Summary: The Samsung Galaxy Note is a new device that sits in between the large screen smartphones and smaller tablets, but I am not sure if there is a need for such a device.

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As we heard last week Samsung announced some new products today at IFA in Berlin. James wrote about the new Galaxy Tab 7.7 that looks lovely with that Super AMOLED Plus display. We also have the Samsung Galaxy Note, which is a very interesting device at 5.3 inches. This is my Next has a hands-on post with some great images of this new device.

The Samsung Galaxy Note has the following specifications:

  • 5.3 inch Super AMOLED display with 1288 x 800 pixel resolution (285 ppi density)
  • 1.4 GHz processor
  • 1GB RAM
  • 16 or 32GB of integrated storage
  • 8 megapixel rear and 2 megapixel front facing cameras
  • Stylus pen
  • Android 2.3.5 operating system

The pen input is unlike the HTC Flyer in that you can use your finger or the stylus interchangeably. The device will launch in "the coming months" with HSPA+ and/or LTE support, but those deals are still being worked out with the carriers. I am not sure there is a place for a device like this when you have 4.3 and 4.5 inch smartphones and 7 inch tablets, but it sounds like the display is amazing. If you went with a smaller, more compact phone and wanted a tablet that was pocketable then this may be the perfect device for that scenario.

Topics: Samsung, Hardware, Laptops, Mobility, Tablets

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38 comments
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  • RE: Samsung Galaxy Note: Is it a phone or a tablet?

    Very interesting. Wasn't Dell tried to do something like this with its 5" Streak that was sold on AT&T lines last year and failed? Of course its failure was majorly Dell and its lack of support.
    Ram U
    • RE: Samsung Galaxy Note: Is it a phone or a tablet?

      @Rama.NET
      You are absolutely correct! If the Dell Streak 5" had of had ANY support whatsoever, it would probably have taken the world by storm! I'm excited about this laptop/phone!
      rvbarton0831
  • If it can't fit into a shirt pocket, it's not a phone.

    That's a bit much Matt. :/
    Dietrich T. Schmitz *Your
    • RE: Samsung Galaxy Note: Is it a phone or a tablet?

      @Dietrich T. Schmitz * Your Linux Advocate Can one's netbook, laptop or desktop PC fit into a shirt pocket? No, but if one installs Skype (or equivalent), adds a microphone and has an internet connection then they're all phones.

      Just like a smartphone is also a PC.

      P.S. I wonder what Samsung thinks Dell did wrong with their Streak device?
      Rabid Howler Monkey
      • Can a netbook, laptop, or desktop fit into a shirt pocket?

        @Rabid Howler Monkey No - but can this thing? I'm not sure I'd want to carry something large around in my pocket

        When they're able to make flexible retractable high res OLED screens - then I can see having the ability to put a small tablet into your pocket and pull the screen out of the body when I want to use it - but I don't see jamming something this large into a shirt pocket
        archangel9999
      • RE: Samsung Galaxy Note: Is it a phone or a tablet?

        @Rabid Howler Monkey ... I imagine what they did "wrong" was use their standard tech support attitudes and ways. Never expect support fro any company after the object has been paid for!
        tom@...
    • RE: Samsung Galaxy Note: Is it a phone or a tablet?

      @Dietrich T. Schmitz * Your Linux Advocate
      Score 1 for those of us that carry their phones in a shoulder bag!
      ibap
  • Wuzzat say?

    Other things being equal, I would think people will go with the smallest device that they can read the text on. There may well be an age-related segmentation by screen size: the older you get, the more you want that 10" screen.
    Robert Hahn
    • RE: Samsung Galaxy Note: Is it a phone or a tablet?

      @Robert Hahn
      You got that right. I'm in my mid-50's and one of the reasons I went away from the iphone is that I got sick of deal with the puny screen. I read a few books on my iphone, but it wasn't much fun. Web browsing was slightly better, but useless for many non-mobile sites. My Galaxy S has been a lot better for reading and browsing. My next phone should have an even bigger screen. We'll see if 5.3 inches is still OK. I also want an even better camera, so the Galaxy Note might be a candidate. Too bad it's an Android phone. A similar phone for Windows would be nice.
      Schoolboy Bob
      • RE: Samsung Galaxy Note: Is it a phone or a tablet?

        @Schoolboy Bob I hope they or Nokia make a similar WP7/WP8 device. I carry my phone on my belt (off-hand side) 'cause I don't want it falling out of a shirt pocket!
        sk1rtsfly
    • RE: Samsung Galaxy Note: Is it a phone or a tablet?

      @Robert Hahn
      I dont think so as most peole I know hate small screens and are loving the move back to larger screen devices. When i got my evo people loved the size of the screen and complained how they hated when cell phone went to being very small as they break easy, hard to use and with touchscreen the standard unless you have tiny fingers a 3.0 screen just doesnt do it. The iphone has a very clear screen but is way behind on the screen preference size. i love the 5.3 screen and its a samsung only better phone maker is htc.
      Fletchguy
      • RE: Samsung Galaxy Note: Is it a phone or a tablet?

        @Fletchguy Wait 'til you see Nokia high-level WP7s.
        sk1rtsfly
  • Could be useful

    Hmm... It has a dual core processor, and a graphics resolution large enough to display regular websites with minimal sideways scrolling. -- Or possibly to open spreadsheets and other productivity stuff, and Remote Desktop in pinch.

    My father doesn't like the smaller screened smartphones because the screen is too tiny for his eyes, and for tapping with his fingers.

    It could probably fit in a pants pocket. This could be a perfect size for a business phone.
    voltrarian
  • It's Neither

    It's too big to be a good phone and too small to be a good tablet. Sure, it CAN do both but trying to do so will make it not very good at either one.
    cornpie
    • RE: Samsung Galaxy Note: Is it a phone or a tablet?

      @cornpie
      Actually its sized just right to be great either way. the screen is large enough to be very productive but still more then small enough to be a great smartphone. It may be a bit large for womens hands but for an adult male its perfect no small screen like the iphones.
      Fletchguy
    • RE: Samsung Galaxy Note: Is it a phone or a tablet?

      @cornpie My Motorcycle is like that. I ride a KLR650. It can be ridden on the street or the dirt. It is not the best at either but is pretty good at both. It has a great support system in place too. It also happens to be on of the best selling motorcycles in Kawasaki's line up for over 20 years. With the right support, Samsung could have a winner here! I am interested for sure.
      tgschmidt
      • RE: Samsung Galaxy Note: Is it a phone or a tablet?

        @tgschmidt
        Ring-a-ding-ding fts both, but ... beyond that, a pretty poor analogy.
        tom@...
    • RE: Samsung Galaxy Note: Is it a phone or a tablet?

      @cornpie
      More accurately, they're just the same plain old TOYS that have been pitched blindly over the year or so.

      As ot s now. alwayus has been, and always will be.
      Jeez, such dumb attempts at gettng responses to nothng! .
      tom@...
  • RE: Samsung Galaxy Note: Is it a phone or a tablet?

    WHAT? There isn't a "Need" for ANY tablet. They're all just luxury devices that serve no real purpose (at this point at least).

    Give me a break.
    Droid101
    • Who made you king?

      I know it's disheartening, but no one has elected you to speak for all of humanity. Tens of millions of people have already bought tablets, and tens of millions more will do so within the year. It is apparent that they do not share your judgement that the devices "serve no real purpose."
      Robert Hahn