Commercial Support now available for the open-source NGINX Web server

Commercial Support now available for the open-source NGINX Web server

Summary: The new number two Web server in the world, open-source NGINX, is now offering commercial support.

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NGINX tops Microsoft s IIS in the Web Server race

NGINX, the fast Web server, now comes with commercial support.

NGINX, the popular open-source Web server, recently swept by Microsoft's Internet Information Services to become the second most popular Web server in the world. Not bad for an open-source project without any commercial support! NGINX is changing that now. Its parent company has just announced commercial support options for businesses.

According to the newly formed, July 2011, Web company, NGINX's original creators and developers will provide support for small, medium or large-scale commercial Web site installations. Three technical support packages are available--Essential, Advanced and Premium--covering installation, configuration, performance improvement, software maintenance, design, implementation, and optimization assistance.

NGINX promises to offer "rapid response and resolution of problems and incidents, including emergency bug fixes and prioritized development. Subscribing customers will also receive proactive notifications about major changes, security patches, new and interim software releases, and recommendations about available updates and upgrades. All packages can be supplied based on either a 12- or a 3-month contract. Subscribers to the Advanced and Premium options receive design, implementation and optimization assistance, as well as prioritized development. Premium subscribers will have access to an additional set of customization options."

Consulting services are also available to assist customers in tailoring their bespoke configurations or adding further features and functionality. Since enterprise adoption of the NGINX is trending up as one of the top 5 business open-source applications, I expect many commercial customers to be interested in these service level agreement (SLA) support plans.

"These options were designed with NGINX business users in mind," said Andrey Alexeev, co-founder of NGINX in a statement. "Whether you are using a NGINX in a single instance or thousands of NGINX-based Web servers for commercial applications, we now have direct vendor support to suit all levels of demand. We listen very carefully to our customers, and the commercial technical support packages are designed to address their most common needs. Several enterprises have already subscribed, and in the future we will be offering more services based on customer feedback."

That said, NGINX also promises that it will not be abandoning its open-source roots. "Open-source community users will continue to have access to an extensive range of free support and advice from a variety of online resources. Documentation, knowledge base, mailing lists and forums that provide insights on how to work with NGINX, address bug fixes, obtain workarounds, and build applications are being constantly improved. Users can also download and browse complete source code and binary packages from NGINX web sites, and report and track bug fixes.

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Winners and Losers in Business Open-Source Software

NGINX takes 2nd place in Web Servers from Microsoft IIS

Apache and IIS' Web server rival NGINX is growing fast

Topics: Open Source, Browser, Hardware, Servers

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12 comments
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  • RE: Commercial Support now available for the open-source NGINX Web server

    Great job, Igor and NGINX team.
    daikon
  • RE: Commercial Support now available for the open-source NGINX Web server

    It's not the number two webserver - just like Apache isn't the number one. nginx is used mostly as caching front-end reverse proxy, therefore it appears to serve under more domains than it actually does, because in most instances the actual web server behind it is an Apache or IIS installation.

    Also calculating web server market share based on served domains is like calculating car market share based on run miles. Anybody referring to such stats and stating that based on those X or Y web server is number one or two just proves how clueless he is. Well, SJVN is that anyway.
    FF44
    • RE: Commercial Support now available for the open-source NGINX Web server

      @FF44
      It's not the number two webserver - just like Apache isn't the number one, because in most instances the actual web server behind it is an Apache or IIS installation<br><br>You do have some credibly links/facts to support your opinion.
      daikon
      • RE: Commercial Support now available for the open-source NGINX Web server

        @daikon You're obviously confusing opinions with facts. Being wrong by wanting to calculate market share and market position by observing HTTP server strings, counting and comparing them is a FACT.

        I don't have to know or prove that in how many instances is the server string wrong or is hiding one or more server installations beneath it, because as long as I know that at least in one instance it is wrong or hiding another server (like on any of my servers which all use nginx as a reverse-caching proxy), I proved that the numbers are inaccurate, and therefore the stats are wrong.

        The same goes for calculating market share based on domains/IPs served. I don't have to know how many actual installations of Apache, IIS or nginx are out there to know that by counting domains/IPs you won't be able to actually assess the number of installations of each type/brand of web server, and that therefore any calculation based on those numbers will not yield in you actually being able to compute the "market share", and in turn determine the market position (like "number one") of said web server softwares.

        QED
        ff2
      • RE: Commercial Support now available for the open-source NGINX Web server

        @ff2 Split personality. <br>No confusion. An opinion is based off facts.<br>You based your opinion off your facts, so all other opinions are wrong.<br><br>Please send off an email to Netcraft to let them know there facts/opinion is wrong. <br>Let us know there response.

        Hooah!
        daikon
    • RE: Commercial Support now available for the open-source NGINX Web server

      @FF44
      >>...because in most instances the actual web server behind it is an Apache or IIS installation.
      Even if it is true, what would be the reason to hide IIS behind nginx or apache? And it might be lack of trust.
      eulampius
  • RE: Commercial Support now available for the open-source NGINX Web server

    Duplicate Post
    daikon
  • WOW - Actually wrote an article about something related to Open Source

    After the last couple hit count generators about MS, it's amazing he wrote about something he supposedly knows about!!!!!

    It's a miracle! I wonder of ZD net approves of going back to his supposed area of expertise? Just won't generate the hits his MS articles do!
    Cynical99
    • RE: Commercial Support now available for the open-source NGINX Web server

      @Cynical99
      Do you know about nginx? I do, I have both apache2 and nginx installed. I also know that nginx rocks and is getting very popular. I do not know about IIS, it is not available for my system and ... yes, I do not trust non-free, close-source stuff.
      eulampius
      • You are funny

        @eulampius
        Weird, but funny
        Cynical99
      • RE: You are funny

        @Cynical99 You, for sure, are both funny and weird. Just curious, exactly what FOSS, if any, is currently used at the global corporation where you work?
        Rabid Howler Monkey
      • RE: Commercial Support now available for the open-source NGINX Web server

        @rabid howler monkey
        Actually, with only a couple exceptions, we use no Open Source. The suits on another continent decided long ago that Open Source wasn't reliable enough and since we buy our software unless the application simply isn't available commercially, there's not much room for FOSS. Besides, we want stuff that works, reliably. While some FOSS stuff does work reliably, bad reliability experiences drove them away.

        Too many rules and regulations in this business anyway. Once you cross international boundaries, you need international support. The bulk of international support isn't FOSS, so more or less rules it out.
        Cynical99