Hype and open source

Hype and open source

Summary: The behaviors we expect from vendors after we adopt their products are different from those we expect in the proprietary world. So are those we expect before we adopt. The carnival barker has a tough time when we can see through the tent to the reality inside.

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TOPICS: Oracle, Open Source
6

Jonathan Schwartz made an online appearance last week, placed his foot into his mouth and chewed thoughtfully.

Based on downloads he claimed that Sun's JavaFX is "the fastest growing RIA platform on the market." (The Big Apple Circus is now playing at Stone Mountain Park outside Atlanta. Through March 7. I will explain.)

Whoa there, sport, responded Dan Rayburn at his Streamingmedia blog.

 Sun is new to the RIA market yet apparently, has already declared themselves the winner, even though no JavaFX based video apps are being used in any wide scale adoption. Not a single one.

Jonathan's going all Roland Burris on us, he implied.

No. But he is selling something.

One of Dan's readers quickly parsed Jonathan's words for him. He was talking about the Java platform. It depends on what the meaning of is is.

That's not how I read it. I see the Sun CEO conflating downloads of JavaFX with use of the platform. They are not the same thing. Not everyone who downloads Chrome makes it their first-choice browser. The same is true, in spades, with Rich Internet Application tools.

This relates to my earlier story on Facebook and Internet values. The behaviors we expect from vendors after we adopt their products are different from those we expect in the proprietary world.

So are those we expect before we adopt. The carnival barker has a tough time when we can see through the tent to the reality inside.

Topics: Oracle, Open Source

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6 comments
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  • Over 90 billion sold.

    And MacDonald's can assure us that nearly every one was eaten. Two hundred million copies of Vista sold and although I doubt any of those were eaten, the number in use are far smaller than the number sold. It might be easier for proprietary vendors to get away with inflated claims but there are no rules that would keep an Open Source vendor from trying.
    kozmcrae
    • Do you have [b]any[/b]...

      Do you have [b]any[/b] proof that the number of Vista copies in use are "far smaller" than the number of copies sold?

      And no, people repeating this on Slashdot over and over is not proof.

      Thanks for your feedback on this matter!
      Qbt
      • Do you have proof?

        Were all copies sold still in action? Microsoft is completely silent on Vista's MIAs. You're right about the idiots over at Slashdot but the idiots in Redmond could refute me any time they want. I have, however, seen one copy of Vista eaten.
        kozmcrae
        • Why?

          Why do I (or MS) need to prove anything? You are the one making the claim in the 1st place so the burden of proof is on you. Unless you have proof that the number in use are "far smaller", your claim is hollow and should be dismissed. It is just another in an endless stream of anti-Vista mis-information. FUD, if you will.

          And I can't recall one single person ever claiming that [b]all[/b] of the licenses sold are actually in use. But there is a huge difference between "most" and "far smaller", so I eagerly await your explanation of how you got to your conclusion.

          And no, websites like www.MacsAreTehBestest.com isn't proof either.
          Qbt
          • Your wait is over, here's my proof.

            Microsoft never tells us how many are MIA. That's all the proof I need to know it's substantial. However, the proof you want doesn't exist. Are you still trying to get me to admit that I'm a Linux advocate or a Mac advocate? I've used XP and Linux for about the same number of years. I have no use now for Microsoft or their products. You may not have noticed this but the bad news buzzing around Redmond has been increasing over the past couple of years. Microsoft pays people (like Gartner and IDC) to issue "reports" that make them look good. All this accomplishes is to mask the true severity of their problems. It also gives poster like you a false sense of security. So rave on and enjoy it while it lasts.
            kozmcrae
  • RE: Hype and open source

    IT is not wise to calculate yourself as No. 1 based on the downloads.

    Cheers,
    Kathiravan Manoharan
    http://kathyravan.blogspot.com
    http://paisamechanic.blogspot.com
    mkathiravone