If you have a proprietary partner is it still open source?

If you have a proprietary partner is it still open source?

Summary: Does this offering make sense from an open source perspective? Is this the future of open source business collaboration? Are hybrids the way to go in the cloud as well as on the road?

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JasperSoft, an open source provider of business intelligence (BI) software, and Talend, which offers open source data integration, are teaming with two proprietary vendors, the Vertica analytic database folks and RightScale cloud management companies, to deliver a BI solution for clouds.

But should this blog be covering it? Is this really an open source story?

Part of me says no.

You have to sign contracts with all four vendors to produce a solution. The result could bring smaller firms into the BI universe, and could even create some BI VARs, but you should compare costs, benefits, and terms to what you would get from a proprietary vendor, not an open source one.

Part of me also says shut up, Dana.

This blog covers open source. Both JasperSoft and Talend qualify. This partnership delivers a BI solution that lowers costs and offers more flexibility. Is that not what open source is all about?

While some analysts consider BI to be "recession proof," that's a function of the underlying technology. I still know of large companies in the Atlanta area that rely on spreadsheets, not customized BI databases, for handling major projects. BI vendors face a learning curve that goes beyond technology, one that has more to do with management training.

So even proprietary rivals of JasperSoft may have something to applaud here. If you can give companies a taste of the technology, without requiring a big investment, that grows the market for everyone. In this case the cloud lowers the market entry point to the ground. Does that make it a fog solution?

Anyway, does this offering make sense from an open source perspective? Is this the future of open source business collaboration? Are hybrids the way to go in the cloud as well as on the road?

The market will decide.

Topics: Data Management, CXO, Data Centers, Enterprise Software, Open Source, Software, IT Employment

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3 comments
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  • Aren't Most Open Source Based Solutions Hybrids

    Don't most application stacks (custom or COTS) that include open source components also include proprietary components? For example, every Vertica implementation is on an open source OS. I know there are many pure open source implementations, but I'd be curious to know if there is any empirical research that would identify the number of hybrid implementations versus pure open source implementations. Anyone have any pointers?

    Dave Menninger
    http://www.vertica.com
    dmenninger
  • I would restrict opensource to foundation-developped software

    Dana,

    I think that there is 2 categories :
    What I would call "pure blood" open source, developped by non profit foundations(GNU, Mozilla..) : Linux, Apache

    Everything else is commercial software (distributing source source is only a marketing tactic, it's similar to a free demo; see Eric Barroca, Nuxeo's CEO post about it : http://blogs.nuxeo.com/ebarroca/2009/08/commercial-open-source-or-just-a-free-demo.html). When I say everything, I mean:
    - commercial open source from foundation software (Day, Nuxeo, RedHat...; you can build your own binary code from the opensource) as well as
    - Commercial Open source with original IP (MySQL, Alfresco...; they provide the core solution in binary and source form) and
    - "closed software", with some opensource code used, usually for interfaces or non core features (all the software is "closed-source" ie it's not available in source form in addition to its binary form : IBM, Oracle, SAP and many others...).

    If I go back to your initial question, I think that it is your choice as a blogger to either choose
    - a strict definition of Open Source, and if so, you could not comment about commercial opensource, or
    - to have a more global definition, and, if so, you should discuss about closed-source software as well as commercial open source.

    Difficult choice !

    Regards
    arisbourg
  • RE: If you have a proprietary partner is it still open source?

    BI vendors face a learning curve that goes beyond technology, one that has more to do with management training.<a href="http://ipadbagblog.com/"><font color="white"> k</font></a>
    zakkiromi