Signs of strength in open source

Signs of strength in open source

Summary: The point is that we who report on the open source world, as well as those of you who live in it, have a natural impatience. We see the glass as half-empty all the time. But it's also half-full.

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TOPICS: Open Source
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Glass half fullDespite everything its opponents say or do, despite even the occasional ineffectuality of its supporters, open source continues to move forward. (That's an iced tea glass, from Jason Shellen.)

Every day's news brings more evidence:

This is not an exhaustive list. All these stories are fairly fresh at the time I'm writing about them.

The point is that we who report on the open source world, as well as those of you who live in it, have a natural impatience. We see the glass as half-empty all the time. But it's also half-full.

In fact I'd say it's much more than half-full.

Topic: Open Source

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  • Good example of open source prospects.

    The content management example to which you linked does illustrate a number of important points.

    Quoting:
    As the market for high-end enterprise software continues to consolidate in the hands of a few megavendors,...

    The competition has size, money, reputation and a long head start.


    ... startups are increasingly turning to open-source practices as a way to launch products and services.

    What else is there for them? Think of open source as a form of venture capital for which they're applying.


    Quoting:
    Rather than fighting for scraps at the low end of the market, however,...

    The "scraps" are, as previously discussed, the cheap and not very capable niche.

    To confirm with a quote from the article:
    Although most large businesses will choose from among EMC, IBM, Oracle, or SAP for such software, many smaller businesses would rather create their own file-sharing systems or simply do without, says John Newton, co-founder of Documentum, a content-management company bought in 2003 by EMC.

    Sounds like cost and complications are the problems, doesn't it?!


    Quoting:
    ... many entrepreneurs believe that the open-source model is the best way to eventually usurp power from the top.

    And, correspondingly, as with the reduced cost Longhorn and all those other downmarket products which have been announced, larger companies are trying to fill in the niche the elaboration of their products had opened.

    Who will win, large companies or startups? The reason it's news when David beats Goliath is because David rarely beats Goliath.
    Anton Philidor
    • It's that the point...

      "The reason it's news when David beats Goliath is because David
      rarely beats Goliath."

      Isn't that the point of the parable, David showed it was possible to
      overcome seemingly insurmountable odds to be victorious.

      Interesting *you* should put MS in the role of Goliath ;-)
      Richard Flude
  • Everything is changing

    Let's face it. The growth of open source software is obvious, and the reasons are also obvious. Finally, after so many years, oss is coming into its own, and its changing the software industry in a good way. No, Adobe doesn't like the concept behind GIMP or InkScape, but it realizes that the industry it has known for the last 20+ years is going thru some serious changes, and it, and other software companies (like Microsoft) will have to modify not only their business models, but also their annual reports.

    Another incredible off-shoot of open source software is the 'open content' community. The Creative Commons licenses, the free MIT class data and a growing repository of totally free digital content (free as in free speech and beer) are making things easier for all of us. Just this morning, I found a link to a totally free comic book (http://www.skotos.net/games/marrach/comic/awakenings/).

    The worlds of technology and digital content are forever changing, and nothing can stop it. As far as I am concerned, it's just going to get better and better!

    Mitch
    opensourcepro