I bought a Mac. So sue me.

I bought a Mac. So sue me.

Summary: Yeah, I know what I said.

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TOPICS: Apple, Hardware
397

Yeah, I know what I said. So sue me.

Sigh.

Yeah, remember this article I wrote back in 2009? I think this is the money shot, right here:

So why won’t I own a Mac? Well, for starters, I’m a systems integration expert by profession — as in what I do that pays my day to day bills –- and the systems that I work with and architect are based on Windows as well as Mid-range/Enterprise platforms like Linux, VMWare, UNIX and mainframes.

The Mac, for all its Insane Greatness and cool factor, as well as having all the DNA to make it an enterprise platform, doesn’t get a lot of traction in large enterprises, so there isn’t a lot of motivation for me to own a system which has no bearing on stuff that I work with to make a living. Additionally, most of the off-the-shelf tools which I work with that I need to do my job -– Microsoft Office, Visio and Microsoft Project are all Windows applications.  Indeed, you can get Office for Mac, and you can even dual boot a Mac into Windows, but what would be the point? Why not just buy a PC?

Why would I incur a large personal expense on a Mac for home use when my laptop is corporate managed and issued to me as a company asset, and when all our line of business systems are Web and Java-based? If anything, I want my personal assets to be compatible with what I work with. And if I am going to use an alternative platform to Windows as either a desktop or a server, I’ll use Linux, because it has a huge library of Open Source software. Mac can use Open Source software too, but why bother if I can buy a commodity PC which I can purchase for a fraction of the cost?

Well, times have changed. Since 2009, I've softened up on Apple a teensy weensy bit. I've purchased two iPads. I also started listening to the Angry Mac Bastards (one of which, Peter Cohen, we recently hired as our new Gamification columnist) which I will now blame for causing me permanent brain damage, should this blog deteriorate any further over the next weeks and months.

On Tech Broiler, I began to follow the Apple space a bit more, particularly as it relates to iOS applications and using the devices in the enterprise. And I noticed that as I got more and more into advanced digital photography and doing videos for my food blog, there were a bunch of applications that I really wished I could run on my Linux-based and Windows 7 systems and could not.

Two of those are Aperture 3 and iMovie. Both of which are Mac-only. And while Adobe's Creative Suite 5 runs on Windows, I want to use the Mac version.

Now, I consider myself to be a practical person. I wasn't going to spend top dollar on a new Mac, like my buddy Scott Raymond, who bought a brand new Air so he could run Windows 7 on it. Let some other idiot go through the depreciation. I don't need to be that cutting edge for a system I'm mostly intending to use for specific photo and video editing apps.

Well, and iTunes, because the version for Windows should be brought to the shed.

So I looked at the prices for used systems at Apple's store. They were decent. I mulled it over for a few days to make sure I hadn't completely lost my mind. Then I got this... email.

It was from a very large, reputable vendor that sells refurbished computer systems. And they were willing to give me a corporate discount. Usually, they only sell PCs. Specifically, ThinkPads. But it just so happened they got a whole crop of 2007/2008 15" aluminum chassis MacBook Pros in, for a really insanely low price. They were even willing to throw in a 1-year warranty for a slight premium.

Now, I had to bump the RAM, since the used laptop only comes with 2GB, but that was easily rectified by picking up a 6GB upgrade for $124 from the folks at Macsales.com. After all was said and done, with taxes and the extra warranty, I was able to join the bliss of the Reality Distortion Field for $982.00.

In a couple of days, the MacBook Pro will be in my hands. I've even gone through the trouble of cleaning off a dedicated area for it on my desk which used to have piles of papers and unidentifiable clutter, some of which I discovered were from the previous decade.

So maybe I'll never buy a new Mac. Check back with me in another two years. Now, if you'll excuse me, I'm going see if they have mock black turtlenecks in my size.

Did you too finally give into the Reality Distortion Field? Talk Back and Let Me Know.

Topics: Apple, Hardware

About

Jason Perlow, Sr. Technology Editor at ZDNet, is a technologist with over two decades of experience integrating large heterogeneous multi-vendor computing environments in Fortune 500 companies. Jason is currently a Partner Technology Strategist with Microsoft Corp. His expressed views do not necessarily represent those of his employer.

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397 comments
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  • RE: I bought a Mac. So sue me.

    Oh, don't bring me into this, Perlow. You brought this on yourself! :)
    flargh
    • Nice to watch them maturing

      Yet another sign of the decline of MS, even their fanboys are jumping ship:-)
      Richard Flude
      • Wow. There had to be a first one

        @Richard Flude <br>Why am I not surprised it was you?
        John Zern
      • Poor John

        As I sit in my office amongst my Apple (Mac OS X), IBM (RHEL) and Cisco gear I wonder what it must be like for John who's MSCE qualification is so poorly valued that they must worry about the price of a computer they use 60+ hours a week.

        Fortunately their lack of experience allows them to believe their Dell is of the same quality, as they reach for their windows install disk to re-image their machine to reverse declining performance.
        Richard Flude
      • YEAH YEAH YEAH!!!

        @Richard Flude
        Haha, that was perfect! I love it when we Mac users deride Windows users. I really do see it as our duty to make Windows users feel bad about their choice of OS and in that post, you nailed it Richard, you really nailed it. Great job!
        edtimes
      • Richard, just want to check something with you...

        @Richard Flude <br>"As I sit in my office amongst my Apple (Mac OS X), IBM (RHEL) and Cisco gear I wonder what it must be like for John who's MSCE qualification is so poorly valued that they must worry about the price of a computer they use 60+ hours a week."<br><br>What type of IBM are you looking at? They haven't made PC's for about 4 years now. Is the IBM big, larger than an old VCR? And have two or three flashing lights? <br><br>And the Cisco gear. Does it have lots of flashing green and yellow lights too? Do a load of cables connect to it?<br><br>I don't want to worry you but I think your Manager, who might just possibly be an MCSE is having a little joke with you...<br><br>Your "office" is either a wiring closet or a store room.<br><br>Sorry to break it to you.<br><br>Perhaps when you get a big boy's certification like a CCNA or MCP then they might find you a cube.<br><br>Well, I guess at least it's cool in there...
        dazzlingd
      • RE: I bought a Mac. So sue me.

        @Richard Flude

        Jason a Microsoft Fanboy? I think not. He is a ZDNet Clickjacker. Just writes heated blogs to generate comments and arguments.
        bobiroc
      • RE: I bought a Mac. So sue me.

        @Richard Flude

        I fail to see any fanboy comments here Jason merely stated this

        I?m a systems integration expert by profession ? as in what I do that pays my day to day bills ?- and the systems that I work with and architect are based on Windows as well as Mid-range/Enterprise platforms like Linux, VMWare, UNIX and mainframes.

        which does not make him a fanboy due to this

        The Mac, for all its Insane Greatness and cool factor, as well as having all the DNA to make it an enterprise platform, doesn?t get a lot of traction in large enterprises, so there isn?t a lot of motivation for me to own a system which has no bearing on stuff that I work with to make a living. Additionally, most of the off-the-shelf tools which I work with that I need to do my job -? Microsoft Office, Visio and Microsoft Project are all Windows applications. Indeed, you can get Office for Mac, and you can even dual boot a Mac into Windows, but what would be the point? Why not just buy a PC?

        I think you really need to read the article before you make dumb $ss statements on them
        MLHACK
      • RE: I bought a Mac. So sue me.

        @Richard Flude Declining performance is the number one reason I prefer my Mac to my PC. Even though the specs on my PC are better than my Mac, Windows rot will eventually force me to throw away a weekend reinstalling the OS to clean things up. Performance on my Mac hasn't declined one bit since 2006 and it's never been reimaged.
        bsvee
      • Time to give up on this wives tale.

        @bsvee: [i]Even though the specs on my PC are better than my Mac, Windows rot will eventually force me to throw away a weekend reinstalling the OS to clean things up.[/i]

        Windows rot doesn't exist.
        ye
      • RE: I bought a Mac. So sue me.

        @MLHACK

        Funny, I was thinking the same thing.
        mgaul
      • Yes it does

        @ye, time to give up the fanbui denial<br><br><a href="http://www.google.com/search?q=XP+%22Windows+rot%22&hl=en&num=100&lr=&ft=i&cr=&safe=images&tbs=" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">http://www.google.com/search?q=XP+%22Windows+rot%22&hl=en&num=100&lr=&ft=i&cr=&safe=images&tbs=</a><br><br>Of course the typical Redmond fanbui excuse is "operator error". It's [i]ALWAYS[/i] operator error.
        LTV10
      • Proves nothing.

        @LTV10: I fully acknowledge there are a lot of stupid people out there who have written volumes of information about Windows rot. That doesn't prove it actually exists.

        Oh, and why did you search on XP? You are aware Microsoft has released two versions of Windows since then are you not?
        ye
      • RE: I bought a Mac. So sue me.

        @Richard Flude

        Perlow, an MS fanboy? Yeah, okay.
        sammybaby
      • RE: Proves Nothing

        @Ye

        Proves nothing is right. The term Windows Rot came about primarily by people falsely blaming poor computer performance on Windows neglecting the fact that they had their hard drive 90% full, some sort of malware infection, tons of stupid add ons like toolbars or adware ridden free games. Before Vista and Windows 7 the computers I managed at work with XP or even my family's computers never suffered from Windows ROT or performance issues without some underlying problem like those mentioned above.

        This is no different than people ignorantly blaming every BSOD on Windows when the evidence shows that 95%+ of the time it can be proven that it was some sort of failure of hardware, driver, or 3rd party software that caused it.
        bobiroc
      • Windows Rot.

        For anyone to state that Windows Rot doesn't exist is either delusional or being untruthful. In the first place, Windows NTFS filesystems fragment which contributes to Windows Rot. All the way through XP, there was no automated process to defragment. I have seen Windows XP computers where the fragmentation is so bad the entire disk shows red on the analyser and it takes 3-5 hours for the first defrag to complete, then about an hour for the second because it was so incredibly fragmented.

        Registry Errors.
        http://www.instant-registry-fixes.org/what-causes-a-registry-error/
        [B]Normally, an entry or key when no longer used?after you uninstall an application or close a program?are deleted automatically from the registry. However, at times some of these keys are either left behind and leave vacant spaces or registry holes. Over time, a large number of obsolete, redundant, and invalid entries and registry holes accumulate within the registry causing it to grow at an unwarranted rate. Eventually damaging, corrupting, and fragmenting the registry.[/B]

        Hence you find LOTS of "registry cleaners" out there in the marketplace. However, as CORRECTLY stated, from time to time, unless you want to roll the dice with a registry cleaner, a FRESH INSTALL is always a good way to get rid of this element of Windows Rot.

        I could keep going but I suspect that several will say these problems are "entirely illusional", redefine Rot to NOT include these or the old standy "I have never had that problem so it doesn't exist" type arguments.

        TripleII
        TripleII-21189418044173169409978279405827
      • RE: I bought a Mac. So sue me.

        @Triple II

        Actually, you could automate disk de-fragmentation in XP. It just wasn't a completely opaque system process that you had to kill if you tried to plug in an SSD before Windows 7, which at least with proper firmware, will automagically disable disk fragmentation and use TRIM instead.

        Your registry reference is worthy of debate. On the one hand, the REGISTRY worked fine. It was poor coding by 3rd party developers that mucked it up. The criticism would be as design flaw. However, I've addressed complaints about performance on Macs because the users never figured out that they had to move the application from the disk image to their applications folder, and were remounting the non-persistent image every time they opened the app.

        The people that can claim, and there are many of them, that their 10 year old installation of XP works just fine have a perfectly valid argument. The "rot" is not intrinsic to Windows except in regards to the fact that you're free to pollute your Windows environment.
        tkejlboom
      • Or they just don't buy into the FUD.

        @TripleII: [i]For anyone to state that Windows Rot doesn't exist is either delusional or being untruthful.[/i]

        I guess some of us don't fall for the FUD like you.

        [i]I could keep going but I suspect that several will say these problems are "entirely illusional", redefine Rot to NOT include these or the old standy "I have never had that problem so it doesn't exist" type arguments.[/i]

        You could but repetition won't make it true.
        ye
      • RE: I bought a Mac. So sue me.

        @Triple II

        Other file systems have disk fragmentation issues as well. Fragmentation isn't unique to NTFS systems.

        Also, the registry was a fine idea in the first place. It was more or less that software developers forget to clean up after themselves during the uninstall process. This causes most of the issues with the registry.

        Properly maintained, a Windows machine can run just as well as any other. Improperly maintained, another OS can run just as poorly as a system with "Windows rot".
        spacespeed
      • The registry is nothing more than a database.

        @spacespeed: People like TripleII lack the ability to distinguish between the manner in which something is stored and what is being stored. They often attribute erroneous data contained within the registry as a failing of the registry itself. If there's invalid data in the registry it's because something put that invalid data there. It's not because of the registry. The data would be no more valid if it were stored in plain text files.
        ye